Brian Kivuti

Student - B.A(Hons) Jewellery & Silversmithing
Nairobi, Kenya

About Brian

Languages

English

Areas of Expertise

Jewellery designer maker, Design, Fine Artist

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

97099
Brian Kivuti
Posted about 2 years ago
Rebecca Saxe: How we read each other's minds
I really like that you pointed out the intersection between philosophy, neuroscience and design beginning. From a design perspective, it may be worth-while to consider that we may have more information soon on the impact of our works. As such, even a fine artist may be able to more consciously construct their work to promote better development/awareness on a more precise level. While there is still that gap between scientists like Rebecca producing this research, and others who may benefit from it, what I think we'll find is that many surprising (and often indirect) uses will come from such valuable research.
97099
Brian Kivuti
Posted over 2 years ago
Kirk Sorensen: Thorium, an alternative nuclear fuel
This sounds like a definite GO FOR IT! plan. However, with the conflict produced by Oil, might the same happen with Thorium in regards to the nation that controls its mining sites? It does appear to me as a plan that is indeed would definitely benefit from the breaking down of international conflicts and national interests (like nearly everything else), that it may power the world rather than simply a hand-ful of nations. I suppose if stronger, more advanced countries did indeed end up hogging control over the resource, then continents such as Africa could still harness solar and geothermal power. Either way, this sounds like a brilliant idea :) It would have been wonderful if Kirk Soronsen briefly explained why thorium was not used as the first choice as nuclear fuel.
97099
Brian Kivuti
Posted almost 3 years ago
Lakshmi Pratury: The lost art of letter-writing
Its funny, her concluding notes really made me feel a little less alone. By this I mean, in most other mediums, e-mail, Facebook, chats on Skype etc, I've found (so far) that people are much more reluctant to express much deeper personal thoughts and emotions, especially about the other they are writing to. I suppose, there is a power in the physical act of hand writing - one many artists are aware of, but often do not acknowledge. It, in some ways, puts into the 'writer' a power we tend to reserve to professional writers. She spoke personally of something I had been going through in depth. While maybe, that she composed her words in a style closer to free verse, her message became much more accessible; it is comforting to know that someone else is going through the same thing, and that this we hear, is not written for performance, but a private expression of a personal truth.
97099
Brian Kivuti
Posted over 3 years ago
Shirin Neshat: Art in exile
Fantastic talk. I personally found it quite inspiring as an artist, and member of a nation not too stable ourselves (nothing compared to Iran though), and is still finding its true voice. I suppose what I really wonder for a nation such as this, and its people, is that it will never be the same again. It is unlikely to ever return to its former state. I do however believe that there is hope that it could evolve into something new and wonderful - and even hopefully, greater than its glorious past before their great struggles. In short, I would love to know how Shirin Neshat envisions the new Iran to come, just as I try to envision a new Kenya to come.
97099
Brian Kivuti
Posted over 3 years ago
William Kamkwamba: How I built a windmill
I really think thats an idea worth spreading! I definitely am a believer (among other things) in the power of a good education; enriched with wholesome material (hence my love of TED), and inspired by a healthy re-creation of old information in the students mind.