About Patrick

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Languages

English, French

Areas of Expertise

pyrotechnics, Sound and lights shows

Comments & conversations

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Patrick Brault
Posted 4 months ago
Geraldine Hamilton: Body parts on a chip
"We'll never have human on a chip", she says... Mmm. And what about a brain on a chip ? What we can do, we will one day, to be sure. We'll certainly have to rethink what it means to be human then, but I for one wouln't want to be this man on a chip. I nonetheless applaude this big step in medical science.
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Patrick Brault
Posted 4 months ago
Andres Lozano: Parkinson's, depression and the switch that might turn them off
Well, I certainly don't pretend to be able to speak in your name about this. That's why I asked you what you felt. I do believe, though, that people can communicate things, and understand each other. Of course, I do not endure what you're enduring, but empathy does exist. What I understood about depression (not at all a medical point of view !) : it's a disease that affects your will and your drive (whatever you put behind this word), and also your ability to enjoy anything, to want anything, and in the end, to think anything clearly. So it destroys the very tools you would need to get better. In that perspective, you're right, it's much more than sadness, however extreme. Do you think my understanding is correct, or do I miss entirely the point ? To get back to Lozano's talk, if deep brain stimulation was to cure only the symptoms of depression, a bit like drugs but without the secondary effects, that would already be a great achievement. That would be giving you back the tools to make yourself get better, don't you think ?
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Patrick Brault
Posted 4 months ago
Andres Lozano: Parkinson's, depression and the switch that might turn them off
To be specific : no, I never suffered from severe depression, but I used to live with someone who did, so the debate is much more than theoric for me. That's why I said this talk is full of hope. And I have nothing against intrusive surgery in the brain, so this is not the issue. I have a question for you, though : based on your experience, do you think depression is something fondamentaly different from sadness ? Or would you say depression is similar to sadness in nature, but raised to the extreme so it becomes a disease ? Remember that Lozano speaks of the "sadness center", area 25 of the brain, as overheating in people with depression. Would it imply that depression and sadness differ only in intensity ? Any mistake about it would mean that the treatment would miss its target, don't you think ?
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Patrick Brault
Posted 4 months ago
Andres Lozano: Parkinson's, depression and the switch that might turn them off
I find that talk very full of hope, and in the same time a bit frightening. While I love the idea of helping to cure people who suffer from disease, and relieve the pain they endure, I cannot help questionning the issue of normality, as casualy used by A. Lozano. Of course, depression is a severe disease, but what is the limit between "normal" grief and illness ? When a loved one dies, it's considered normal to feel terrible grief. But how would you react if you had a remote that could turn your unsufferable sorrow off ? And would doctors feel compelled to increase your level of bereavement, if they consider it to be abnormaly low ? As often, great breakthroughs in science imply new questions, issues that we should take seriously.