About Jouko

Bio

I am a member of board in Hollming Ltd., a Finnish family owned conglomerate operating in environmental technologies, auxiliary units, service and metal works. My current focus in leading ballast water treatment business sector at Auramarine Ltd.

I am physicist by trade and have studied in Turku University, Finland, where I am also doing studies for eMBA.

Previously I have worked with nuclear safety issues in Finland and in Sweden. My main area of expertise there has been fast transient analyses.

I am passionate about environmental technologies, energy technology and clean tech in general. My view is that tomorrows problems are only tackled if the process starts already today.

Languages

English, Finnish, German, Swedish

TED Conferences

TEDGlobal 2014, TEDGlobal 2013

Areas of Expertise

Environmental Technology, Nuclear Engineering, Ballast Water Treatment

An idea worth spreading

The future will bring challenges and the only way to survive these challenges is to do things better, in more clever and less disruptive way. This includes the life cycle of every product and technology from cradle to grave. With smart environmental technologies it is possible to not just repair problems arising from present day decisions but also partly use the resources discarded in the past.

I'm passionate about

new technologies, innovative ways to solve problems and ways to help the environment survive us.

Universities

Turku University

Talk to me about

Environmental technologies, Energy production, saving energy, innovative ways to make things, marine ecology or the weather

Comments & conversations

190527
Jouko Salo
Posted over 4 years ago
THORIUM. Is it really that safe and great alternative to Nuclear? Is it the Other Miracle that Bill Gates is looking for?
Just to make one thing clear at first: Thorium power is nuclear power. The main point of using thorium, in addition to the proliferation issues with uranium, is that there is 10 fold amount of it available compared to Uranium. If you take into account also the fact that we only use uranium-235 in our nuclear reactors, and this consitutes only 0.7% of the total amount of uranium, the increase is 100 fold. Thorium reactors also operate by burning uranium. This is created from thorium by bombarding it with neutrons. This forms uranium 232, which is highly radioactive and is hence hard to deal. This is why U232 can't be used for nuclear weapons, it's hard to handle. If you consider the events which are now unfolding in Japan, the heat being released at Fukushima is from the fission products. Fission products are an inevitable result of fission processes and therefore such an event could also happen to a thorium nuclear power plant. Thorium as a nuclear fuel is propably the way to go in the future. This is due to it's high availability and low price. But before we get there we need to learn a lot more about large breeder reactors and reactors operating on fast neutrons.
190527
Jouko Salo
Posted over 4 years ago
So what is the CO2 footprint of nuclear energy really?
It's a good question and a hard one to answer. As always with this sort of things, the result depends on who calculates the emission and what effects are taken into account. The largest contributing factor is the grade of the uranium ore mined. This is because enriching uranium takes huge amounts of energy even with the most efficient methods. The World Nuclear Association puts CO2 emissions from nuclear power between 9 and 21 g/kWh. (http://www.world-nuclear.org/education/comparativeco2.html) You should remember though, that WNA is an association of nuclear power companies so they would probably prefer a low figure.
190527
Jouko Salo
Posted over 4 years ago
Stewart Brand + Mark Z. Jacobson: Debate: Does the world need nuclear energy?
After watching this TED presentation I must agree with Stewart. The reason is that the energy density of nuclear power can not be matched with wind power or solar. Another thing is, as Mark states in the video, the process of building a nuclear power plant is rather long, but so is the process of building a wind turbine. Atleast here in Finland the power companies have large problems in getting permits for their wind farm due to the NIMBY phenomenon. Also, you have to apply for permits for each of the wind power sites which takes a lot longer than applying for permits for a single site. To solve the future energy crisis we need to build nuclear and renewables and we need to do it fast. Otherwise we cannot meet the Copehagen goals.
190527
Jouko Salo
Posted over 4 years ago
Bill Gates: Innovating to zero!
I agree with Joachim that pumped hydro is the best technology to store MWh amounts of energy. You can check the attached link, which is about a suggestion to store windpower with pumped hydro reservoirs in Denmark. I shortened the link: http://goo.gl/czCfO
190527
Jouko Salo
Posted over 4 years ago
Bill Gates: Innovating to zero!
I found this article on Physorg about EADS wanting to build one: http://www.physorg.com/news183278937.html But I've also read about a Japanese company that has plans for the near future.