About Nuno

Bio

Nuno Miranda Ribeiro. Tradutor EN-PT; PT-EN. Tradutor voluntário TED desde 2006.

Languages

English, Portuguese

Comments & conversations

Noface
Nuno Miranda Ribeiro
Posted almost 2 years ago
Colin Stokes: How movies teach manhood
Your comment is an oasis, in a very emotional and agressive debate. And I think you've hit the point. We should raise our children, ourselves. And not rely on Hollywood's role models. These kinds of analisys, like the one in this talk, are very helpfull, because they allow us to deconstruct the way culture shapes our model for what masculine and female behaviour "ought to be". And those models should be debated and rejected, when they are sexist. But to expect that our pressure will make culture produce an ideal model, and raise our children, is a dangerous thing. And I think that is already a trend, that Hollywood has taken perversely. Many mainstream movies, for instance teenage flicks, show a group of youths that is representative and multicultural, multiethnic, and there is even the overweight one, the dorky one, the sporty one. And those movies are even more filled with preconceptions than the ones that are not "representative". They show a parade of clichés of how everyone is suposed to be represented and behave. I prefer a world where there is no such pressure and the prejudices are out in the open. And, then as a free thinker, I will debate. And I expect that a serious debate will influence society as a whole, not just Hollywood scriptwriters - anyway, they will always find a way to dodge any tacit rule that is created. And as a parent, I will know what my children are suposed to be exposed to, and what values they should be raised with. What I mean by "influencing society as a whole", is that for me it's not enough that the army, for instance, treats women in the same way that men are treated there. In this context, we should be more ambitious and profound. Isn't the need for war and agression a masculine thing? And as we fight for emancipation, and for equal rights, and rethink about what we are as men and women, how we represent masculin and feminin, should this emancipatory struggle not include a serious debate about war and why we have armies?
Noface
Nuno Miranda Ribeiro
Posted almost 2 years ago
Margaret Gould Stewart: How YouTube thinks about copyright
I discovered this talk, through a post discussing Fair Use, as it applies according to this: http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl102.html And, though I do believe that we reached a point that makes a lot of people dismiss authorship, even to the point that the sharer becomes perversely more important than the author, this example of the Sony song is creepy. This makes me think of the movie "The Truman Show". It seems that we are coming to a point where everything is susceptible to product placement. And indeed what happened in this case seems to me more like product placement than a case of copyright. It's a creepy Orwellian world, or more specifically a Truman Show like world, where everyone is performing. Everyone is sharing their content, their own lives, in Facebook and Youtube, even giving up the rights and the ownership to that content (their own lives and memories), and companies are profiting from that content. Like in The Truman Show, through product placement. Pretty soon (already, maybe?), Nike and Coca Cola will profit because someone shared a photo or a video drinking a soda or running with brand shoes. And the content will not even belong to the people performing (acting in their own lives), but to Facebook. This was what the example given sugested to me, in a creepy, twisted way. And, sadly, there is little room, too, for Fair Use, but that is another debate.