Morry Patoka

Chief Accelerator, CTC Consulting
Toronto, Canada

About Morry

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Bio

Creating the conditions for success. When I was old enough to think about what I wanted to do in my life I was in my 40’s.
My early years in marketing led to senior management roles, then the C-Suite, venture capital and business consulting. The one constant was my focus on accelerating strategy from situation to insights to ideas, putting the plan together and igniting the team to execute it.
So, I’m an accelerator. I zero in on what we can do better as an organization today, and boldly explore the possibilities for our future. I am tenacious when it comes to implementation, ensuring the culture and framework is in place to evolve at a rate faster and smarter than competitors.
My goal is to enable organizations that are driven to excel, have the desire to be innovative, and whose people look forward to coming in to work with each other every day.

Languages

English

Areas of Expertise

Unlocking talent, Securing commitment, Inspiring courage, Igniting passion, Strategy Consulting, Growth, Innovation, Marketing, Meeting Faciliation

An idea worth spreading

People create the conditions for success.

I'm passionate about

My children, making a difference, living an inspired life, sharing joy.

Talk to me about

Everything. Every topic is an opportunity to learn something new.

People don't know I'm good at

Cooking. Well, at least I like what I make. And I've been told I'm not too shabby at song lyrics.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Morry Patoka
Posted 3 months ago
Diana Nyad: Never, ever give up
The things I really want to accomplish will never attract global media coverage, get me on Oprah or probably even a TED stage. That's okay. The goals I really care about are extremely noteworthy... to me. Just as Diana's were for her. Diana's journey, her perseverance and mantra help to remind us what we have to do to accomplish our individual goals. Let's "find a way", and be enriched by the journey we take.
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Morry Patoka
Posted over 1 year ago
Melissa Marshall: Talk nerdy to me
There is a really important aspect to this cute presentation that I'd like to share through my own experience running a tech company. I was sitting in the meeting room with our development team of programmers, most of whom spoke broken English at best. I myself had no technical training whatsoever. I was running the business and the business depended on the software we were developing. I knew what the system had to do and relied on the team to figure out how to make it happen. But it wasn't happening so smoothly. After a few hours of listening, watching, and asking some simple questions about the data structure they had drawn on the oversized whiteboard, I noticed something. The conversation, although very technical, always circled around to the same issue. After seeing how they addressed other stumbling blocks in the architecture I got up from my chair at the back of the room and stepped up to the whiteboard. I humbly asked for their consideration as I erased a few tables and arrows, then redrew them in a new configuration with key codes and one-to-many relationship lines that I saw them using. I turned to look at the team and asked, "could this work"? Silence. After what felt like an incredibly awkward few minutes, our head programmer slowly nodded his head and said, "Yes...this could work." And as it turned out, it did. You see, I'm a visual thinker. Draw it out and I can comprehend things a lot quicker then through words alone. The lesson for all of us, scientists, technicians, experts in any field, is to find a way to express concepts in an inclusive way, because you never know where, or from who, the next idea will come from.
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Morry Patoka
Posted over 1 year ago
Margaret Heffernan: Dare to disagree
Collaboration without conflict is simply consensus. And there’s nothing very innovative or inspiring about nodding your head in agreement just to avoid conflict. It takes guts to stand toe to toe with someone, whether they’re the schoolyard bully or the CEO of your company. However, having facilitated several thousand hours of group interactions in pursuit of new ideas to solve hard problems, one thing stands out at least equal to the fear of conflict. Vulnerability. Speaking up, not always in disagreement, but even to ask a provocative question or share a personal perspective, is hugely uncomfortable for most of us. More significantly, it stops us from sharing what might be the one spark that leads to the most innovative, life altering ideas. The new model of thinking needed is based on creating the conditions for creative connectivity. That includes data, people with diverse experiences, processes that provide the freedom to fail fast, and multiple dialogue channels up, down, across and outside the organization.
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Morry Patoka
Posted about 2 years ago
Derek Sivers: Weird, or just different?
What I love about this short talk is that it highlights how we can challenge thinking by flipping ideas over to explore and create new ideas. It's a technique I use collaboratively with groups to generate new opportunities such as enhancing customer experience, increasing sales, solving business problems, imagining the future and growing the company. Flip it, as outrageous as it may initially appear, and spark new perspectives.
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Morry Patoka
Posted over 2 years ago
How do you define "being successful"?
To define “what is being successful”, I think you have to begin with, “what is success”. Whether it’s your personal success, or that of your business, I believe success is a combination of two factors – Achievement and Fulfillment. Achievement definitions are generally linear. Cross the finish line and you’ve won. Be the last one left standing on the reality show and you take home the prize. Fulfillment comes from your Core Values – the foundation of your being and the guideposts for your most critical decisions. Success is not just cold, hard accomplishment, nor is it a Sunday afternoon Made For TV movie. Success needs both achievement and fulfillment, in some kind of symbiotic, emotional balance that creates the conditions for you to live a good, safe, healthy and rewarding life. If you’re interested, I wrote a short article on the subject of success from a business perspective at http://createtheconditions.com/what-is-success/. One last thought... what you consider success today may not be how you will view it tomorrow, or next year, or in ten years. We change. The world changes. And along with those things, so does our definition of success.
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Morry Patoka
Posted over 2 years ago
We can all be heros! We share many of the same insecurities and fears, so why do some people take action while others continue to look away?
Thanks to everyone for sharing your thoughts. Fantastic perspectives and comments. The idea, or more accurately, the “ideal” of being a full time hero is not entirely realistic. Hey, even Superman had a day job. While we hear about people who have dedicated their lives to doing heroic work, I believe that most heroes are made in increments. Sometimes, many small actions over a lifetime can add up to superhero status. Isn’t that part of the reason we see our parents as heroes, time and time again coming to our rescue? Maybe we make the concept of hero too lofty an ideal. For most of us it’s rarely a big Hollywood moment backed by explosions and a dramatic music score. It’s more about seeing something that needs to be made right, and having the courage to do something about it. Not once in our lives, but throughout our lives.
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Morry Patoka
Posted over 2 years ago
Alberto Cairo: There are no scraps of men
The story itself is inspiring but it's the storyteller who provides the greatest inspiration. And it is this... hero's aren't born, they're just like any of us. Fearful. Worried. Distracted. Reluctant. Everyday people who find themselves in extraordinary situations. The difference happens when we do something about it. Sometimes it's instinctive, like protecting a friend from being bullied or put down. Other times it gets to a point that we just can't look the other way any longer, as in the case of Alberto Cairo. His emotion really came through he told us his story. Even now, he seems to constantly battle his own personal insecurities, reluctantly agreeing to take things to the next level and in doing so, making the world a better place. When we watch movies, why are we drawn to the reluctant hero? The one who has to overcome his own fears and issues and doubts before standing up to face adversity. It's because that hero is a reflection of us. We can be that hero, too. There are thousands of opportunities around us all the time. We just have to open our eyes and our hearts to see that we're needed and believe that we can make a difference. It's as simple as taking that first step, just like Alberto. Once you start, you can't help but do more. Thanks Alberto, for showing us that we can all be heros.