Hassan Hayat

State College, PA, United States

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Hassan Hayat
Posted over 3 years ago
In your opinion, what should the purpose of education be?
I feel that this conversation is beautiful and enlightening in many respects but I still feel a strong sense of vagueness about the answers. Rather, I feel like to pin down the whole issue further I'd like to tweak the question, if I may? In other words, in your opinion, what should the purpose of education not be? By this, I mean, what should the education not teach. Should it not teach morality? Should it not teach religion? Or perhaps, something I care about more deeply than the two previous questions, should it not teach how to pass exams designed by private for profit companies? This list is by no means exhaustive, but I just want to see if it is possible to list all the things one could trash from current education systems to just leave the essence of the teaching in the end.
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Hassan Hayat
Posted over 3 years ago
In addition to increasing income, what else should poverty eradication include?
Yes, I agree that private enterprise would be of great help but they need incentives to appear. Perhaps the best way to speed things up is by integrating micro finance in the whole equation. But my point is that you asked about the eradication of poverty and there is just so much that firms are willing to do for their communities. Granted, numerous companies do take initiatives with that respect, but in aggregate not enough. This is why I believe that non-profit organizations along with governments are key in the initial steps of such an endeavor, more so than private enterprise. For example, suppose you wanted to get a firm to invest near a small town you know to be hard hit by poverty. This can be whatever firm: car manufacturer, agricultural, renewable energies, you name it. This firm upon investing will take into consideration the physical capital at its disposal as well as the human capital. Let's assume there is the physical capital as in the place has strong illumination in the case of a solar power plant, or is very fertile in the case of a farm. In the case of the human capital, they'd rather hire locals than have to hire people from elsewhere and have to pay them the extra to go there, unless they'd have to train the locals. Now, granted companies do train locals but only when it suits them. So, how I see this is as I said earlier, first get the community to survive on its own and care for its own. Then train them by education. Then once that is done the companies will come on their own. (obviously, there should be micro finance not only in case the firms don't come but because it's always better) So maybe a decade has passed before these companies will start to appear, but I don't see any shortcuts. This is when I argue that in the grand scheme of things a decade is nothing in the face of the timeline of human poverty.
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Hassan Hayat
Posted over 3 years ago
In addition to increasing income, what else should poverty eradication include?
I believe that income is secondary in the whole issue. The main problem when it comes eradicate poverty is to allow for an environment that makes survival a non-issue. Only when this is achieved, then increasing GDP per capita, literacy rate, and so on make sense. This means that there are two fronts in which to attack the issue. The first is safe access to food and water, the second is safe access to health care. By safe, I mean no strings attached: the access to both resources should only have as price labor, nothing else. The problem nowadays with donations and charity organizations, is that the solutions are usually temporary, as in a one (or countably many) time supply of food and medicine. Yet, the goal is to allow for a given society to thrive. Therefore, one should look at how to make any given society care for itself. This implies educating doctors and teaching effective agricultural techniques in given societies. Only then can one look at encouraging other forms of education and entrepreneurship for trade and thus achieve the self-sufficiency needed to trade for medicine and then improve on living standards. It does seem like a herculean task because it involves ensuring the safety of these communities and the education of the people involved but in the long term the effort should, at least in theory, be rewarded more effectively that the traditional kicking the can down the road method of just donating. But the only way to attack such a task is to unite nonprofit organizations with governments in order to allocate the manpower to do all the educating and protecting.