Matthew Garvin

Royal Oak, MI, United States

About Matthew

Bio

I'm studying Anthropology, China and Mandarin Chinese, as well as Urban and Regional Patterns and Planning at Irvin D. Reid Honors College through Wayne State University in Detroit

Areas of Expertise

Anthropology (Applied), Asian Studies - China, Urban and Regional Patterns

An idea worth spreading

Everything is connected. An atom vibrates at a frequency based on the composition of the nucleus and the orbit[s] of the electron. Different cells and other substances are made up of different combinations of atoms. Beings are made up of many and different kinds of cells and on and on. Everything is singing its own song. Everything together is performing a symphony. Let's get in tune and harmonize.

I'm passionate about

The evolution of human civilization into a technologically advanced society that actively preserves culture while restoring and maintaining balance with nature.

Talk to me about

Anything

People don't know I'm good at

Yang Style Taijiquan

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

118268
Matthew Garvin
Posted about 3 years ago
Where do you think consciousness comes from?
I think about this all the time, but I'm not reading the conversation. As I explain why, I will reveal my opinion on the matter. It's an exercise to test the simulacra (see: Baudrillard). I study culture as an anthropology major. Turns out, our greatest tool in developing culture and building civilization is our most complex set of mirror neurons that literally connect us on a telepathic level. Cymatics shows us how sounds creates shapes, and of course atoms create a specific vibration. Each element of the periodic table is like a different note, with every combination of which is like playing a chord. Everything is literally humming. Consciousness likely lands within a certain octave or what have you, with varying degrees of complexity. Different kinds of cells band together and develop increasingly more elaborate designs of organisms the better they are able to harmonize as the case may be. As you can see my insights are merely that. This idea came to me through my experiences in meditation using binaural beats successfully to achieve a deeper, more consistent practice. So, forgive the fact that I don't really have scientific backing for this. Isn't that the fun of science though? While we get to apply law, we get to explore theory. Let me throw this in there. The key to success may just be to view the universe and our purpose in it in this fashion. "Playing" out of tune causes dischord among civilization as a whole. But even playing together still appears to be out of tune with the flora and fauna, who add their own melody. I'm sure we could expand that idea on to include everything else on the planet and ultimately, the universe. The more we can harmonize as we perform this symphony, the sweeter the song. Now, I'm not going to go through and cite examples of all the other cultures, schools of thought, religions and so on around the world and throughout history that hold a very similar view. Let me just say, as a student of anthropology, there's a mountain.
118268
Matthew Garvin
Posted about 3 years ago
Is the generation in education getting less intelligent than the ones before them or smarter?
Exactly, we are in a period of transition. The Cyborg Anthropologist, Amber Case, asks what is the difference between storing the library of information we carry around in our handheld electronic devices and putting them on a microchip installed in the brain? The point being that it used to be common place for human beings to memorize vast amounts of information. But now, we don't need to memorize much of anything, we just need to become acclimated enough to the technologies so that we may access such information whenever necessary. When our genus discovered how to cook meat to tenderize it, their strong jaw muscles began to shrink as they were no longer necessary to chew. This freed up a lot of calories in the diet, which were reallocated to increase brain capacity, ultimately evolving into us as the dominant species. I'm very curious to see how this new stage of evolution will result. For now, we do not need our considerable brain power to store trivia, what are we going to use it for now? Because of this transition, emphasis needs to be placed on developing critical thinking abilities. It's not about what one knows any longer, but rather what one can comprehend. In this respect, there is a growing number of the global youth population who possess incredible and innovative critical thinking abilities. These people are the leaders of tomorrow, as they tend to be more determined to achieve, relying on collaborative techniques. On the other hand, and as per usual, there are likely more members of this population who know how to navigate the new technology, but focus lies not in collaborative achievement, but self-serving interests, i.e. entertainment. These are the people that watch Jersey Shore, and tweet about it, but never even heard about the Gulf Oil Spill. But we always see this, there are leaders and followers. It's up to the leaders to break the hold advertisers have over the followers, and teach them the importance of civic engagement.
118268
Matthew Garvin
Posted about 3 years ago
How can we develop a meme that defines a tribe of tribes for the stewardship of humanity and the planet? --A meta-tribe if you will.
Great conversation! I went fishing on google to see what I caught when I searched how to develop a meme to save the world, serendipity! The problem lies in the culture. Our culture currently has a pattern of the consumer capitalist of the cold war. Our culture was manipulated into naturally wanting to amass all these material possessions, putting everyone to work to make all the stuff. In a recent scholarship essay I wrote on how to end poverty in the next 30 years, I postulate that a change in terminology priority in regards to our capitalist attitudes would plant a seed in the next generation to grow into a naturally more collaborative and empathetic society. Prioritize collaborate in place of compete. Instead of zero sum games where even on the most intimate levels is still a competition of the ego, favor non-zero sum games, where we come to understand that in order to protect and expand on our quality of life we must work together to restore homeostasis to the planet. Allan Savory, a biologist out of Zimbabwe, has developed a method of holistic management that does just this. It comes from understanding the bonds and cycles of all flora and fauna in the ecosystem, and being deliberately aware of you role in that ecosystem. We do not need Green World dictators or mandatory Buddhism. We need holistic perspectives and more emphasis on individual critical thinking abilities. There are patterns in our culture, and we can use this knowledge to our advantage. Because not every culture on the planet is particularly interested in consuming mass amounts of energy and compromising morals to save time, effort or make more money. Those are just the patterns and strategies imposed/adopted by societies seeking to modernize. It's been proven to work, and we are creatures of imitation and habit. Like I said, prioritize collaboration over competition, spread the word. Make use of our tool we use to manipulate culture, the taboo. Look down on those who overconsume.
118268
Matthew Garvin
Posted over 3 years ago
Malcolm McLaren: Authentic creativity vs. karaoke culture
I think for the purpose of this conversation, what you are saying about heavier than air flight should be thought of as primary or even secondary innovation. What he is talking about is art. And like Oscar Wilde said, "Life imitates art." So if we are developing the process to become some form of artist in the sense that the method can be successfully duplicated (like that of pop music), then we are not appreciating an art'ist', but rather an art'tech'. Similar in science, the scientist is the innovator who develops the new process and pioneers, the science tech is the one who duplicates the results for whatever application. Sure, it's all been done before. But, has it? Oh, about life imitating art: So if we appreciate canned art as real art and begin imitating that, it's like life twice removed. Not sure if I'm getting the point I wanted to make across but that'll have to do.
118268
Matthew Garvin
Posted over 3 years ago
Patricia Ryan: Don't insist on English!
Yeah, I actually agree with you. But I think she could have made a better argument. This is just a piece of the broader problem of how we can transform the world into a technologically advanced society while preserving culture, diversity, and balance with nature. What we're nervous about is the convergent evolution of language, because different languages have different ways of explaining the world and our place in it. Most urgent is the loss of many tribal languages. The young spend more time learning English and losing their ancestral language to where they cannot verbally communicate with their grandparents. I read that the reason more Americans have difficulty in math is because of the English language. Other languages pronounce "14" as "10+4" and "23" as "20+3", which then makes it exponentially easier to do advanced calculations in your head. And if we didn't have a language capable of doing that, you see where I'm going. And I think for Europeans and Asians and such, being multi-lingual kind of comes naturally, being within such close proximity to a wider array of language, but for Americans, it's rather scarce. Many liberal arts programs require a foreign language, but few immerse themselves in the language and really master it, because everybody wants to speak English, probably because we're too lazy and ego driven to take an interest in another culture, and the circle continues right down the bottleneck.
118268
Matthew Garvin
Posted about 4 years ago
Jessa Gamble: Our natural sleep cycle
I read about this sort of sleep cycle in Tricycle magazine earlier this year. Basically just go to bed when it gets dark out. That period when you are in a meditative state is called Green Meditation. Pretty interesting stuff. I wish I worked a day job and didn't have roommates...
118268
Matthew Garvin
Posted about 4 years ago
Stefana Broadbent: How the Internet enables intimacy
As far as sweeping generalizations go, I think what we will find by and large is that yes, we are communicating with people more, but the depths of these relationships are becoming more shallow. We are becoming a society of page skimmers, attention deficits are growing. Of course you shouldn't be texting on the job, you're on your employers time. At school? Well, you are on your time there, I guess if you want to waste it, do it. I think the tech is great in the long run, but we need to find our balance. I'm embarrassed for my peers, who struggle to form complete sentences, let alone spell them correctly. I pity my teachers, who are great at what they do and present this mind blowing lesson to a bunch of young adults who are too busy texting, "wat u think, shud i c him again 2nite?" Let's not forget that many of these people are texting while they drive, and that's as bad if not worse than driving drunk. There's a time and a place, and we need boundaries.