Simone Ines Lackerbauer

Freelancer and Student, ProSiebenSat.1 Games
Munich, Germany

About Simone Ines

Bio

Creative researcher in communication theory and born as a digital native in 1985, I study cyberculture in all its variants.

Ever since I first became acquainted with the Internet in 1996, my goal was to understand the possibilities of virtual environments and related technologies. Never content with merely consuming, cyberculture has become the central object of my research. Whether by exploring virtual communities or by analyzing countercultural manifestos, my research goals coherently focus on digital media, communication practice, and technological utopia.
Being trilingual, I have direct access to a wide variety of sources and I understand the cultural diversity connected to communication science. Working on various interdisciplinary projects has allowed me to reach an open-minded, nonetheless critical position toward cyberculture and related innovations in their societal contexts.

I went through school in a small German town, tackling almost all available side activities (editor-in-chief of the school magazine while writing about Barbie and changing the world, playing the sun in a musical, the side-flute at concerts, painting and drawing… you name it). My interest in media and communication led to studying what it might be about. With two freelance jobs in the gaming industry, I obtained my BA in 2008 and continued to work full-time and freelance on online games.

Being curious about France, I obtained a French diploma and a full grant of the DAAD which allowed me to move to Paris in 2010 to pursue a Master’s degree in interdisciplinary communication and information studies. My greatest experience in 2011 was to attend summer school at Stanford. Back in Europe, I am still freelancing, pursuing my degree, and exploring different options for the time after my degree (and always open for suggestions).

In my leisure time, I am an amateur painter, illustrator, and passionate traveler, as well as an internet and tumblelogging tech geek who loves work out in the gym and reading all kinds of books on her Kindle.

I wrote my Bachelor's thesis on "Life online - philosophy and reality", my first Master's thesis on "Why study science fiction? The use of anticipatory literature as an educational tool", and I am currently writing my big Master's thesis on "Creating cyberculture. Autodidacticism and creativity in the emerging cyberculture and the rise of technological utopia."

I am currently in the process of obtaining a second Master's degree in translating literature and I am a doctoral candidate for a Ph.D. in sociology.

Languages

English, French, German, Spanish

Areas of Expertise

Cyberculture, Virtual Worlds, Media & Communication, Illustration, Media education, Writing, Digital Lifestyle, sociology, Art, Translataion

An idea worth spreading

Cyberculture as a mainstream concept is based on the development of personalized usage of technological tools, such as computers. Autodidacticism and creativity play a decisive role in this process. Together with the cultural movements surrounding the first signs of cyberculture - such as the countercultural movements, libertarianism, new economy, cyberpunk in science fiction, and the VR hype - favored the emergence of technological utopia (and dystopia). These visions are based on different settings regarding the relationship between individuals, society, and the ever-accelerating technological progress, from technological determinism with postmodern cybernetic structures to positivist socio-constructivism and sociotechnical concepts. Media and mass culture reflect our struggle to cope with the changing shades of the real and virtual self in real and virtual societies.

I'm passionate about

Sociology, cyberculture, VR & AR, SF, autodidacticism, new media, intercultural exchange, tech utopia & dystopia, art, literature, writing, illustrating, singing, foreign languages, travelling

Talk to me about

Cyberculture, virtual worlds, digital lifestyle, sociology, art, creativity, augmented reality, utopia, media & politics, science & research, think tanks, collaboration, education

People don't know I'm good at

Singing. Being generous, nerdy, ambitious, fierce, laid-back, serious. Hiking, bodybuilding.

My TED story

TEDxParisUniversités in October 2010, right after I had moved to Paris. Googled TED and found the TED website, got inspired by events like TEDxSiliconValley, and the big TED Conferences. Got involved as a volunteer translator, later as Conversation Host. Went to TEDxParis in January 2011. Watched TEDGlobal 2011 on the webcast and was completely stunned. Went to TEDxBrussels 2011 in November 2011, then TEDxConcorde in January 2012 in Paris. Will be going to TEDxESCP in Paris in February, will watch the TED 2012 webcast live. Attended TEDxParisUniversités in April; haven't made it to a TEDx in Germany yet, but I'm keeping my eyes open. Would love to volunteer at a TEDx! And in 2012, I was happy to help with the translation of TEDGlobal posts into German for the blog of the Süddeutsche Zeitung.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

231979
Simone Ines Lackerbauer
Posted about 2 years ago
What adverse effects will the kids have, whose moms are working professionals?
Questions like this one are among the reasons why I don't see myself raising children anytime in the near future. I don't want to be confronted with these things, I don't want to have the impression I might be a bad mom, just because I would refuse to quit my job for my hypothetical children. In any case, how is it possible to generalize this sort of issue? Doesn't it depend on 1) the child itself and its character 2) both parents, not only the mother 3) the surrounding family and friends who can help? When I was little, I would spend lots of time with my great-grandmother, because my mom was working part-time. Did it harm me? Hell, no! On the contrary, it helped me to see the world from a different point of view with everything my great-grandmother told me. Moreover, it helped me to gain a tiny bit of independence, as in walking home alone all by myself, like a big girl.
231979
Simone Ines Lackerbauer
Posted about 2 years ago
Are constitutional monarchies still relevant in the 21st century?
I don't think you can talk about current monarchies without referring to their predecessors. Which doesn't mean to say: monarchies have always existed, so they should continue to exist today. On the contrary, it means that there has always been a reason why they existed: leadership and power in Ancient Greece which current monarchies are mostly not entitled with any longer; but back then, monarchies were also a symbol for political unity and represented the respective countries abroad, just like today. Chancellors and Prime Ministers aren't so very different when it comes to what they represent and how they are seen by the people or by foreign countries. Moreover, members of royal families in the direct line of succession are educated in political issues, so it's not like they are not qualified to ascend the throne.
231979
Simone Ines Lackerbauer
Posted about 2 years ago
Are constitutional monarchies still relevant in the 21st century?
I strongly agree with Debra. As she said, the British are fond of their monarchy and the Queen is a remarkable person. Although we all have long ago outgrown fairy tales of princesses and knights, I think monarchies are still surrounded by a certain romantic aura -- and the values they represent live on. I think Monaco definitely is a great example for that (a Cinderella tale). I also think that royal families are able to pay their bills with their own money and I highly doubt that taxpayers' money is spent on royal décor. As for tourism... why not? People travel everywhere and anywhere to see the most amazing buildings and to attend the most stupid events. It's great that we are curious to see what's out there, what's going on in the world. I wouldn't say no to a guided tour through the royal palace... :)
231979
Simone Ines Lackerbauer
Posted about 2 years ago
Are we qualified enough to select our our own president, or prime minister or chief minister?
Isn't your model exactly what a representative democracy is supposed to be, as in the UK and in Germany? I'm saying "supposed to be", because the elected members of the parliament don't necessarily represent the opinions of all the people when it comes to selecting ministers and chancellors. I am tired of voting for a *political party* that has a political program which more or less (and rather less nowadays) corresponds with my personal ideas and beliefs. Instead, I would love to vote for the ministers directly and, so to say, tell them who they have to work together with, instead of letting the political party make those decisions for me. Would it be better to have regular citizens vote who don't know much about politics, or to have parties fight it out amongst themselves once we vote for them? I don't know. But I think more people would be interested in politics if we had the impression of truly being able to change things with our votes.
231979
Simone Ines Lackerbauer
Posted about 2 years ago
Michael Hansmeyer: Building unimaginable shapes
I agree and disagree with both of you at the same time and I think your discussion is less related to the Talk, but to design itself. Isn't he difference between randomly drawing lines and extracting a design not previously envisioned from it, and envisioning a result which you then plan to draw a general difference between various types of designers and artists? We also have to ask ourselves: what was the purpose of his Talk? To show off well-known things (e.g. handling algorithms, Mandelbrot...), or to view design from a different perspective, less related to what we are used to? But very interesting thoughts indeed from both of you...
231979
Simone Ines Lackerbauer
Posted about 2 years ago
YOUR MOTTO?
Vive le temps volé - long live the stolen time, as in the time we take for ourselves and for our loved ones; the time that makes the difference between any life and *your* life.
231979
Simone Ines Lackerbauer
Posted about 2 years ago
Do games make human smarter?
Are you saying that smart children / people should not play games in their leisure time, because the repetitive actions in games do not foster creativity and intelligence? I somewhat disagree with you here. As for PC, console, and online games -- the good ones are not only about repeating things and instant gratification after correctly applying the learned reflexes. Games are also about solving riddles, finding suitable strategies... and you can inlcude a lot of history or social problems in games and let players experience real-life issues in the context of virtual worlds! As for board and card games, the players are equally required to find the best strategies to win and to outsmart their opponents. A poker face can likewise be a useful tool in real-world situations, where you would not want your emotions to surface -- but that is just an example.