Karl Gude

East Lansing, MI, United States

About Karl

Bio

Karl Gude has been visualizing information for news organizations since the late 70s and is one of the few visual journalists who has worked for newspapers, news magazines and wire services. Until recently he was the director of information graphics for Newsweek, a position he held for more than 10 years. He has also worked for the Associated Press, United Press International, the New York Daily News and the short-lived National Sports Daily.

Gude has visually covered seven presidential elections, a slew of wars, terrorist attacks, natural disasters, sports, business and countless medical and scientific discoveries. He led a Newsweek team of graphics reporters during the attack on the World Trade Center and later mapped the progress of U.S. soldiers as they headed toward Baghdad. He has charted the ups and downs of the U.S. economy and used statistics to illustrate how Enron executives lied to stockholders.

Gude teaches information visualization for Michigan State University's (MSU) School of Journalism and is a consultant for news and government organizations. A collection of Karl's infographics, personal drawings, paintings and even children's books can be found on Flickr.

Languages

English

An idea worth spreading

Stop writing when you should be visualizing...

I'm passionate about

My family, drawing and painting, BIG Daddy Roth, New York City, my knees, my dog, 'Let It Be' album, Pop Tarts, Turner Classic Movies, Twitter...

Comments & conversations

86350
Karl Gude
Posted over 2 years ago
How does the status quo design of student - faculty interactions diminish innovation in the classroom? How to hack higher ed?
Linda, I hear what you're saying about letting students know that they are not great. (I even wrote a quick HuffPost article called Why University Students Arent' Amazing Anyone and What They Can Do About it in response to their constant need to distract themselves with Facebook despite my best efforts at engaging them.) I think it's important that students get that message but know you are coming from a point of caring and encouragement that they could be amazing and stand out in this world. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/karl-gude/why-university-students-a_b_1382141.html
86350
Karl Gude
Posted over 2 years ago
How does the status quo design of student - faculty interactions diminish innovation in the classroom? How to hack higher ed?
Diminishing people is easy. One professor told me that it wasn't his job to 'engage' his students. He says his lectures give them the information they need and if they choose not to absorb it that wasn't his problem. I suggested he might save himself the trouble and just put a tape recorder out. I see teaching as somewhat parallel to parenting or managing a dept at a company. The instructor is in charge and sets the tone, and there are many things they can do to uplift students, to encourage participation and growth using simple rules like praising in public, criticizing in private.
86350
Karl Gude
Posted over 2 years ago
How does the status quo design of student - faculty interactions diminish innovation in the classroom? How to hack higher ed?
I assume you mean the design of our courses/teaching efforts and faculty-student relationships. The thing I hear most from students is that many professors don't care about them, and this diminishes them in some way. Many cut off their nose to spite their face by skipping class and not doing the work. I had one student tell me that they did work for one professor because they were terrified of her, but she told me that she did work in my class because she wanted me to be proud of her. I think students just want to be 'seen' by their professors. Innovation in the classroom to me is engaging students with experiential learning and empowering through professor-student interaction and respect. Even in large classes students can get the message that you care, or don't.
86350
Karl Gude
Posted over 2 years ago
How does the status quo design of student - faculty interactions diminish innovation in the classroom? How to hack higher ed?
So many of my fellow professors call female students 'girls.' I and others call them women, and for some of the undergrad students I get the feeling that isn't something they're used to, but they like it and it sends a message to them that we see them as mature adults. I have huge respect for my students just because they're on this planet.