Linda Soelystio

San Francisco, CA, United States

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Linda Soelystio
Posted over 4 years ago
Motivation and Procrastination. How to get rid of distractions and get the job done.
Great topic. I've heard about and read Pink's book and thought about it for some time. He made a really good case about what drives us on the intrinsic level. But I think intrinsic motivation alone will not do it. In terms of dealing with procrastination, I like the old-school way of just doing it. And what I mean by that is not just doing a task for the sake of doing it. I mean doing it because I know it is good for myself in the long run. Things like delaying instant gratification and disciplining myself. I liken it to building muscles. They are sexy to have but in order to have them, I have to endure a lot of physical (or muscular :D) pain. No muscles are ever obtained from thinking about wanting to have them. The only way to get them is to exercise our old muscles until they are ripped and we get sore for the next few days. And please don't think of me as someone who has done it all. In fact, I am dealing with my own share of self discipline and procrastination issues. Glad you brought up the issue..!
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Linda Soelystio
Posted over 4 years ago
What are the biggest challenges in changing societal behaviours to become more sustainable in all ways?
I would definitely agree about the lack of will. And the general idea of your comments about compromising our values for other values that we thought could make us happy. My other thoughts: I takes time to make behavioral change in a large scale like a society. And I think we really undervalue the value of being patient. Change can happen if certain individuals can believe it strong enough and have enough perseverance to carry it out until change emerges. I think it's more like eliminating a bad habit that each of us has. The more ingrained a bad habit is, the harder it is to break away from. Yet I think all habits, how matter how deeply ingrained they are in our being, can be broken. The same way, societal behaviour (or habit) can change. It takes time and effort. Also I believe in the power of individuals to inspire other people to think and behave in a different way. All breakthroughs are first, breakthrough with old traditions. I think the old values are that people in power put profit above all else like sustainability and human welfare. Looking at the current situation now, I think positive changes are already happening. More people who have the power and money to fix environmental and human welfare problems, are doing them. One of your questions is about identifying our largest obstacles. In a perfect world, if every individual can follow their moral integrity and values, we would not have the problems that we have today. But less affluent people would not have the time and energy to dedicate themselves to such issues when there is a more immediate of trying to survive and make ends meet. I would say that by increasing human welfare - improving standards of living and paying workers better wages so survival concerns are taken away and they can better dedicate their efforts to making changes that benefit the environment and society.
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Linda Soelystio
Posted over 4 years ago
How to use doodling at work? How does it improve creativity?
I go to art school and in my early education, students were required to take up sketching and drawing classes. One of my favorite sketching instructors used to tell us students that being able to draw is more than just learning skills. It's about a way of thinking. Just like a novelist think in words and forms of expressions, an artist thinks in space and forms. I think when we are doodling, we are figuring out solutions in terms of space and forms. I study graphic design so it's imperative for me to always sketch and doodle. I don't think doodling itself can improve creativity. I think nurturing our natural sense of curiosity is what improves creativity. Einstein is not known for his ability in drawing, yet I think he is a highly creative person. My favorite is Leonardo Da Vinci who had a really strong curiosity in human anatomy. A great deal of his sketches were studies about the structures of human bodies. I guess my point is this: a keen sense of curiosity is what makes a person creative. A habit of always drawing and doodling is only one of the ways to nurture it.