Aaron Wolf

Social Entrepreneur & Music Teacher, Snowdrift.coop
Ann Arbor, MI, United States

About Aaron

Bio

I am a social entrepreneur cofounding a website at Snowdrift.coop to provide a community-owned system to support creative projects of all sorts without resorting to restrictions on access, modification, or redistribution. Our view is that the world should celebrate sharing and collaboration while providing substantial support for the necessary investments in creating and improving our collective resources. We believe that we have an answer to why this has been a challenge and a solution to the problem.

I am also a creative musician and teacher fascinated with ideas of perception, cognition, structure, and other scientific questions about the nature of experience. My musical expertise is in tuning systems related to barbershop harmony, ethnic traditions, experimental electronic music, and sensory perception. I am also extensively studied in various pedagogy issues in music education, primarily in guitar traditions (including classical, flamenco, and popular and folk styles, as well as synthetic fusions and experimental / creative approaches).

I am passionate about real sustainability, new urbanism, behavioral economics, and other broad social issues regarding our relationships to one another and to the broader world.

Languages

English, Spanish

Areas of Expertise

Music - Arrangement, Composition, Performance, Studio, Music - Guitar, Music

I'm passionate about

Science, Philosophy, Teaching, Music, Psychology, Sustainability, Creativity, Creative Commons, Free Culture, Free/Libre/Open resources

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

212163
Aaron Wolf
Posted 14 days ago
Chris Urmson: How a driverless car sees the road
I would love to see the end of our car-centric road system and return to human-focused public spaces. I'm not sure how dedicated driverless car roads would fit in. My point about running through the group like pigeons flying away was my entire point: there would have to be laws about not just doing that. That's fully realistic, of course
212163
Aaron Wolf
Posted about 1 month ago
Donald Hoffman: Do we see reality as it is?
We can't know that. It's perfectly *possible* for a beetle to recognize that this is a bottle and not a female beetle but still feel absolutely infatuated with how overwhelmingly sexy the bottle is from a beetle perspective. Human beings know that pornographic videos aren't real people right there, but we can totally get into situations where we find pornography more exciting than real people, depending on the details.
212163
Aaron Wolf
Posted about 1 month ago
Donald Hoffman: Do we see reality as it is?
Yes, consciousness is clearly a product of evolution. No, that is not the slightest bit proof of free will in the most abstract sense. We have no capacity here to distinguish between true free will versus the experience of being a competent, conscious being making predetermined decisions (the mechanism for the determined path of reality being the process of a conscious competent being processing information about the world and making a decision) with the free will element as an illusion.
212163
Aaron Wolf
Posted about 2 months ago
Jimmy Nelson: Gorgeous portraits of the world's vanishing people
This is *exemplary*. Besides the photos and ideas being superb, this talk had *zero* B.S. — no pretense, no contrivance. Unfortunately, that's the minority of TED talks these days. He called it out too. Why did he talk about his own awkwardness about the pretense of the TED talks? Because he is a sincere person and decided to share of himself sincerely. That was a gift of sharing perspective honestly, transparently, and with real respect for the audience. Thank Mr. Nelson for the wonderful gift. I sincerely love it.
212163
Aaron Wolf
Posted 2 months ago
Steven Wise: Chimps have feelings and thoughts. They should also have rights
You're right. I meant that all of the evidence we *have* points to the conclusion that they have emotions just like people do (not 100% identical emotions, but still). Studies of chimp brains *do* show the same sorts of emotional activity and structures. But it is indeed hard to get a chimp to sit still in an fMRI or something or for them to communicate in explicit grammatical language that is deep enough. The parallel is a stretch, but we still have *enough* evidence to conclude beyond a reasonable doubt that chimps do experience emotion. And my larger point was that *some* principled doubt can also exist for other people even, despite evidence. The idea of denying that chimps have emotions should rest on evidence that they do not, which is entirely absent. Nobody has ever shown any bit of indication of chimps lacking emotion.