Sean Hines

San Luis Obispo, CA, United States

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Sean Hines
Posted over 3 years ago
There is no such thing as free will.
The problem of free will comes from the gap between our reasons and our actions. Reasons do not cause us to do anything, but having sufficient reason wills (but doesn't force) us to act. So in any decision situation we experience a gap between our reasons and our actions. This is what causes us to think that we have free will. (or so they tell me in the philosophy of mind lectures I have been following) This is the definition of free will I use when I think about the freedom of the will. Can anyone agree or disagree with it so that I can have a more thorough spectrum of the concept of free will to apply all this too?
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Sean Hines
Posted over 3 years ago
There is no such thing as free will.
How do you account for someone that is brainwashed ,with your view of a person "choosing" their own path towards attainment of perfection. It seems you are arguing that some people have it and some people dont. I find myself leaning towards something like this, also. But, at which point in our mental development do we have the ability to choose. I feel as if mine has just kicked in (Im recently 25 and my brain has probably just finished developing). It seems to me that everyone, based on their unchoosable born into circumstances goes through life and does the best that their psychology, biology, socioeconomic situation, and learned behavior allows them too. Is free will acquired?
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Sean Hines
Posted over 3 years ago
There is no such thing as free will.
Who chooses to be happy? I cant do it. Can you choose to be happy while at the same time watching a child be tortured, or having your finger cut off? Maybe some meditation experts can :) An "AI" robot that moves around and stores locations of walls so that it doesn't run into them does not actually learn- it is only manipulating symbols it has no ontological experience of understanding. I often wonder about the problem of being unconscious during sleep and waking up to be the same person. There is no acceptable answer to this philosophically- sadly. Unless the soul counts :(
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Sean Hines
Posted over 3 years ago
There is no such thing as free will.
A fascinating idea, that someday our language will be able to very simple describe consciousness and free will. I hope the solution will be obvious to my grandchildren -if determinism allows me to have them :) Remeber, that the existence of the "√Član vital" or the vital substance behind life was a topic of intense philosophical debate at one time- is now irrelevant due to our understanding of biology. I think its safe to apply this concept to neuro-biology and consciousness/free will.
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Sean Hines
Posted over 3 years ago
There is no such thing as free will.
I have been running into poles and spacing out at work thinking about this stuff, with no one to talk to! Ted is a godsend :D 1. The problem of free will comes from the gap between our reasons and our actions. Reasons do not cause us to do anything, but having sufficient reason wills (but doesn't force) us to act. So in any decision situation we experience a gap between our reasons and our actions. This is what causes us to think that we have free will. (or so they tell me in the philosophy of mind lectures I have been following) 2. I think it is more of a question of how much determinism is there. Im not qualified (yet!) to give a detailed explanation of the neuro-biological and psychological process of decision making- but it is crystal clear that if consciousness is caused by the brain that it is somewhat determined by physical processes creating it. It seems impossible to theorize about this without a PHD in everything. Our own minds trying to understand the underlying process that causes decision making, it almost seems like a joke to theorize at my current level of understanding. I think it will take a dedicated group of researchers from MANY disciplines to appropriately tackle this problem. Searle describes the process: We have the first-person conscious experience of acting on reasons. We state these reasons in the form of explanations. [T]hey are not of the form A caused B. They are of the form, a rational self S performed act A, and in performing A, S acted on reason R. But to people with messed up brains have free will? Do animals? Which part of the brain enables it? Does our free will degenerate? 3. The Mind-Body Problem. Im going to jump in bed with Searle again on this one and state that consciousness is a system feature of the brain. Hopefully in the near future our neurobiology will shed a little more light on what "the self" is and how "we" perceive it.
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Sean Hines
Posted over 3 years ago
There is no such thing as free will.
4. In my own mind (haha)- free will could go either way. I feel as if I am floating through uncontrollable events in my life, and that due to chance learning about myself and the way things work- I am developing a sort of 'free will.' Ridding myself of bad or training myself to have good habits, while learning to control my "behaviors" and emotions in order to more appropriately direct my intention and achieve what I desire (but does an organism learning behaviors constitute will, or free will?)- all of that over the backdrop of my general disposition or outlook on life (which is probably a product of deterministic learned behavior and perhaps a little biology *vagus nerve activity, for example). Did I forget anything? Oh yeah- my current mood, and perhaps even a more intermediate outlook on life. A mind confused by the illusion of complexity? I cant tell!
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Sean Hines
Posted over 3 years ago
Chris Anderson: How web video powers global innovation
After high school I really had no family to take care of me and no solid place to live. Bouncing around from place to place with poor social skills and low emotional intelligence I could never get it together enough to even keep a job. Now, thanks to TED- and free college lectures online, I was able to learn how to become a solid individual in society and Ill be starting college in the fall! During a free online psychology lecture the professor stated that it only takes ONE positive role model in a child's life to greatly increase their chances of escaping the traps of growing up in a poor socio economic situation- thank you TED for giving me hundreds and re kindling my passion for knowledge and love for humanity!