Chris Waggoner

Tirade Trading
Rapid City, SD, United States

About Chris

Languages

English, Spanish

Areas of Expertise

Management, Mathematical modeling, Econometrics, imagination

An idea worth spreading

If priming works in psychological experiments, maybe we could un-prime people as well. In other words, have people write about what they were just doing, so that they don't feel so lab-y.

I'm passionate about

abstract mathematics, idle chitchat

Universities

Indiana University

Talk to me about

quantitative finance

People don't know I'm good at

standing on my hands

My TED story

I like watching TED videos.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

144497
Chris Waggoner
Posted over 3 years ago
Would atheists benefit from a community? Are they maximizing such benefits?
Zdenek, it sounds like we are more on the same page now. It's funny, I was talking to a friend who just finished a PhD in geology today and she used the phrases "science is B.S." and "marketing" several times each. Although as you say, we do seem to get somewhere over decades so something about the macro process is effective. Before the maps of Africa got better, they got worse. So cartography's progress was non-monotonic.
144497
Chris Waggoner
Posted over 3 years ago
Would atheists benefit from a community? Are they maximizing such benefits?
G M, perhaps it is merely a semantic difference. However it does smell a whiff of "scientism", meaning roughly faith in science. It's something R Feynman and other fine scientists argued against. I think the TED audience (myself included) is likely to take claims of scientific progress at face value, or worse to talk about a theoretical model of scientific progress in broad terms rather than looking at the specific facts. However there are reasons to doubt scientific claims that can be observed even by people who just read the newspaper and don't actively take part in sceptically examining results. I'm referring to the economics of scientific research. Zdenek, sometimes models get worse before they get better. One example is European maps of inland Africa: http://web.mit.edu/krugman/www/dishpan.html. It's indisputable that 2.5 centuries after discovering the microscope, the conventional wisdom on disease and biology is much more accurate. But there are many instances on a shorter time-scale of false results being widely believed true, or of true results being widely believed false. For example there were several instances of decades-long fraud perpetrated by prominet scientists which recently received international attention. The online journal PlosComp Biology would not exist were it true that science makes (forward) progress daily. Just to be clear: I am not disputing that "we" know more today than "they" did 2,000 or 200 years ago. Only arguing that scientific progress is not monotonic.
144497
Chris Waggoner
Posted over 3 years ago
Reinventing the resume
Programmers and artists can point to product instead of a resume. Given the different perspectives of potential interviewers, I think it's difficult to write one short document that will inform everyone. I've found that the best measures are (1) test applicants on a task that is as close to their job as you can make it, and (2) talking sincerely. In your case, perhaps you could ask some questions on a website before asking for resumes.