Brian Cox

Cardiff By The Sea, CA, United States

About Brian

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Bio

Medical student at Queens University in Belfast, Ireland. Originally from San Diego where I surfed and ate burritos aplenty.

Areas of Expertise

Human Anatomy & Physiology, Biomedical research, Surfing (The Ocean), EMT-I Certified, Medical Ethics

An idea worth spreading

Explore. Dream. Discover.

I'm passionate about

Medicine, biology, cosmology, astrology, evolutionary biology, kinesiology, neurology, philosophy, poetry, prose, technology, genetics, therapeutics, and innovation.

My TED story

I'm the annoying guy who incessantly posts TED lectures on Facebook...sometimes more than once per day.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

197616 50x50
Brian Cox
Posted 8 months ago
Shigeru Ban: Emergency shelters made from paper
I love that Shigeru Ban highlighted that architecture is more commonly employed as a visible expression of opulence. It takes courage to say that on a world stage, as it greatly reduces his ability to receive funding for future projects. I congratulate his ability to make beautiful, recyclable structures for community benefit.
197616 50x50
Brian Cox
Posted about 1 year ago
Mark Shaw: One very dry demo
Such an incredible application of science. I saw a YouTube video last year which similarly demonstrated the super hydrophobic properties of nanoparticles on a shoe doused with water. Blew my mind. I just a couple of quick questions, apologies if they've already been answered: Does the hydrophobic properties of the nanoparticles reduce friction? For instance, would a boat move more quickly through water? What happens when this gets onto a mucous membrane like your eye? Thanks for the entertaining talk!
197616 50x50
Brian Cox
Posted almost 2 years ago
James Stavridis: A Navy Admiral's thoughts on global security
How come I have never heard: "The USNS Mercy provides sight for an entire village...tonight, at 11." I give credit to the forward thinking of its Supreme Commander Admiral Stavridis, opening lines of communication that foster international dialogue have already proven effective. In the last decade, the Eastern world utilized social networking to end several tyrannical dictatorships, despite their government's futile attempts at censorship. As Jullen Couvreur mentioned below, communication breeds familiarity, helping to "build trust, integration and tolerance." In this case, communication should ultimately bring peace. However, I'm certain many countries would be wary that NATO's attempt to set up these lines of communication is to control or monitor them. We desperately need new generations to remove such cynicism from their hearts and make the leap toward a global society rather than a secular one.
197616 50x50
Brian Cox
Posted almost 2 years ago
Matt Mills: Image recognition that triggers augmented reality
Awesome reply man, thank you for pointing out the differences in information presentation. Correct me if I'm wrong, but you're saying SixthSense and the Google Glasses are basically a personalized means to facilitate tasks and gather information, while Aurasma is like a Twitter/Instagram/Youtube hybrid: where things experienced by the user can be shared to facilitate communication or gather information. Question is then: what will end up being the most useful and/or the most popular?
197616 50x50
Brian Cox
Posted almost 2 years ago
Mina Bissell: Experiments that point to a new understanding of cancer
Excellent talk, but in reading the comments, I think there are a couple clarifications that need to be made: Scientists certainly do think cancer is a genetic disease. This is backed by a multitude of cellular evidence indicating that most cancer cells demonstrate nuclear/chromosomal abnormalities, abnormal mitoses, and abnormal DNA content. Additionally, carcinogens (like cigarette smoke or viruses) cause genetic mutations in a cell's DNA. This is a problem especially if the mutation affects a proto-oncogene. A "proto-oncogene" is most typically considered a growth or inhibitory pathway in the cell (look up p53 if you're curious). When a carcinogen causes a mutation to these proto-oncogenes they become problematic "oncogenes." Single oncogene mutations probably occur more frequently than we realize, but through cellular feedback mechanisms, they are often told to undergo apoptosis before causing any problems. However, in a fairly famous paper published by Hanahan and Weinberg in Cell (2000; 100: 57-70), there are several established "changes" that must occur in order to establish a viable cancer cell. In no particular order, these are: 1. Self-sufficiency in growth signals 2. Insensitivity to anti-growth signals 3. Evasion of apoptosis 4. Unrestricted replicative potential 5. Sustained angiogenesis 6. Tissue invasion and metastasis 7. Genetic instability From this talk, I surmise that Dr Bissell research specifically details the importance of "the microenvironment" - or the loss of coherent communication between cells. Therefore, I'm assuming she would place #1 and #2 in the list above as the paramount cause of cancerous growth. In working to reestablish this communication both in the physical (Form) and in the correct relaying of signals (Function), I believe she will push the boundaries of our understanding of cancer. A lifetime's amount of research (and blood, sweat, and tears) is summed up in this talk, for which we should all be humbled.