Janie Hermann

Librarian, Princeton Public Library
Princeton, NJ, United States

About Janie

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Bio

I am the Public Programming Librarian at Princeton Public Library which means that I oversee the 1,500+ programs planned annually by the library’s 15 member cross-departmental programming team. In 2007 I was chosen by Library Journal as a “Mover and Shaker” for my work in developing Princeton’s technology training program and for the founding of Tuesday Technology Talks in 1999. I serve on the executive board of ALA’s LEARNING Round Table and am active on several other ALA committees. I am proud Canadian and a graduate of GSLIS at The University of Western Ontario, but have lived in NJ for the last 10 years where I have been involved with NJLA and was appointed by the state librarian to serve on the Blue Ribbon Task Force on the Future of Libraries in New Jersey. During the last 10 years have given over 100 presentations to librarians at the local, state and national level on a variety of topics ranging from Social Software to Newspaper Indexing. In my spare time I enjoy scrapbooking, skiing and spending time with my son and husband.

Languages

English

Areas of Expertise

libraries, Community Outreach, public programming in libraries

An idea worth spreading

Libraries are essential now more than ever.

I'm passionate about

Libraries, Transliteracy, Culture, Environmental Issues, Global Peace, Education, ending Hunger.

Talk to me about

Libraries, community outreach, public programming, transliteracy

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Janie Hermann
Posted over 1 year ago
Georgette Mulheir: The tragedy of orphanages
As the parent of a child adopted as an infant nearly 9 years ago from a Russian orphanage this is a talk that resonates with me deeply. We were in Russia for several weeks spending time with our son inside the orphanage before being allowed to complete the process to bring him home and it was the most heart-wrenching experience. To just be helping one child when so many more remained seemed unfair... and many times when I look at my beautiful, bright and happy son I think of those who were left behind and wonder what happened to them. When we adopted, the Russian government allowed the adoption process to begin when children were 3 months old so that they could find families while still infants and thus alleviate the effects of long-term institutionalization. Our son came home to us at 9 months and he does not display long term effects from having spent those months in an orphanage. In recent years, however, the Russian government has made the wait longer and most children cannot be adopted until they are 18 months and older. This greatly increases the chance they will have long-term effects. I agree that the ideal solution is reform that will allow parents to keep their children and for foster care systems to be established. As much as we love and cherish our child, International adoption is not the answer for the long run... the closing of orphanages and support systems for families is the solution. Thank you for bringing light to this important issue. To see what happens to children after they leave Russian orphanages at age 16 I would recommend watching the film The Children of Leningradsky... it will open your eyes. http://www.childrenofleningradsky.com/
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Janie Hermann
Posted almost 2 years ago
Ken Robinson: How schools kill creativity
Best of luck as you find a path to your passion and what you love. I was fortunate to have parents that encouraged me to dream and follow my natural talents. It did not mean that they wanted me to be uneducated and to not learn. Quite the contrary as they pushed me to be the best I could be in my areas of strength - which are creative endeavours as opposed to mathematical or scientific.
186177 50x50
Janie Hermann
Posted almost 2 years ago
Ken Robinson: How schools kill creativity
I wish this talk could be required viewing by all politicians who decide upon educational reform and also by any educational administrator who thinks that standardized tests are the way forward as opposed to encouraging creativity and the ability to think independently. Thank you for this talk.