Cory Warshaw

Curator @ TEDxUCDavis, TEDxUCDavis
Culver City, CA, United States

About Cory

Bio

Since the inception of online TEDtalks, I have been an avid TED enthusiast. In the summer of my freshman year I started TEDxUCDavis, and it has led me along an amazing journey of self discovery and personal growth. I recently graduated with a degree in Biological Sciences and am pursuing a career in public-science relations.

Languages

English

TED Conference

TEDActive 2012

Universities

UC Davis

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Cory Warshaw
Posted about 1 year ago
Paola Antonelli: Why I brought Pac-Man to MoMA
I don't understand why she is so reluctant to qualify video games as art. It's fundamentally weird to debate whether or not one form of creative expression is art or not. People went through this same debate with photography and with cinema, and it seems we've learned nothing. No matter what your definition of art it seems obvious to me that the medium shouldn't make a difference in what makes something art. If you want aesthetics looks at something like Okami, that feels like your living in a Japanese water color. If you want emotion, I challenge you to play the recent Walking Dead series and not feel anything.
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Cory Warshaw
Posted over 1 year ago
Rupert Sheldrake's TEDx talk: Detailing the issues
I was on board at first, questioning a reductionist, materialist, or deterministic model of the universe is a valid line of inquiry. There are limits to science and we should be clear that there are some questions that science cannot answer, that being said many of his claims are either provably false or ask us to prove a negative. For instance, the idea of crystal memory or rat memory. If this was true then after millions of years of forming all over the universe it should be nearly energetically free to make ice. And rats should be amazingly smart. Also the psychic phenomena is hypothesis that cannot be falsified, as one can always say we simply aren't able to measure it. Could it be true, maybe but it's not something anyone can ever prove one way or the other. I know that TED is a place to challenge conventional ideas, but I think above all the talks have to be factually and logically sound. I think he has a right to talk about his theories, but as a TEDx organizer, I do not want falsehoods associated with the brand I work so hard to promote. That being said the issue of censorship is a tricky one, it would be best if he never was given the stage, but that is not the case. I think that at the very least a disclaimer saying, "These opinions reflect personal views and not those of TED or TEDx as a whole" would be a good start.
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Cory Warshaw
Posted over 2 years ago
Jonathan Haidt: Religion, evolution, and the ecstasy of self-transcendence
I am always intensely skeptical about evolutionary psychology, it is often very difficult to parse out when a behavior was directly evolutionarily adaptive, or if it was a latent effect of a different adaptation. Especially for such a specific behavior as the transcendental experience, it could have been any number of things that make us prone to such a behavior and as such this is really just conjecture. Don't get me wrong I loved the discussion on the experience of the transcendental. I just think it is difficult to point to evolution for the cause of it, especially considering his viewpoints are to say the least very controversial. Now I don't claim to be an expert although I am a Junior Evolutionary Biology major, but I have spoken extensively with one of my professors who very much is an expert and this idea of "Group Level Selection" is not a commonly held belief. I'm fine with fringe views getting stage time, but I would've liked a disclaimer that this position is very controversial and goes against some of the central tenants of evolution. Especially when most people viewing this talk will not understand the nuances which make it so challenging.
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Cory Warshaw
Posted over 2 years ago
Sebastian Wernicke: 1000 TEDTalks, 6 words
I thought this was fantastic. While obviously tongue-in cheek the final sentence is something worthy of putting over my doorway, and really captures the zeitgeist of TED. Thank you Sebastian, please always keep your sharp wit and ability to use statistics in ways no one thought to. I'd rather wonder too.
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Cory Warshaw
Posted over 2 years ago
Robin Ince: Science versus wonder?
Must everything devolve into a flame war about religion? (albeit a very articulate and well reasoned flame war) This talk, most likely intentionally, does not even address many of the philosophical and/or theological claims many of you make. Rather it makes an aesthetic claim that ignorance is not bliss, that understanding makes things more beautiful and not less. While the philosophical debate is an important one, it would be nice if we could, for a brief moment, suspend the argument and simply marvel at the beauty in our world and how lucky we are to be in it.
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Cory Warshaw
Posted over 3 years ago
Eythor Bender: Human exoskeletons -- for war and healing
While this technology is certainly remarkable and TED had good reason to present the technology. I felt the presentation felt was a little too contrived. I think the controversy here should not lie in the demonstration of military technology, but what seemed to be a plug for a specific company. I love that TED is growing, and am fine with the new elaborate backdrops and production. I just want to make sure TED remembers its humble beginnings, and does not have its new-found fame taken advantage of as some sort of tech-demo for corporations. Better to keep to one presenter who shows videos of his research than parading around carefully chosen models with scripted lines. Anyway, aside from my feckless internet rant, it is really remarkable the level of sophistication robots are achieving. Imagine integrating this with the 'Sixth Sense' technology. And in 20 years we will all be mini Iron Men (and Women).
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Cory Warshaw
Posted over 3 years ago
Noreena Hertz: How to use experts -- and when not to
While it is indeed possible I am totally off the mark, the message I got from her rhetoric was one of an us vs the experts. I find this a false dichotomy, and the way she presented seemed to stigmatize experts as a whole which was what I took issue with. But the biggest point is that often I don't know what is best, no matter how many questions I ask an astrophysicist I won't understand General Relativity. Basically I believe that ethos can be earned, and should then be respected.
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Cory Warshaw
Posted over 3 years ago
Noreena Hertz: How to use experts -- and when not to
I was extremely discouraged by the berating of this loosely defined term 'experts', and am surprised that TED would put on such an anti-intellectual talk. I was also disheartened by the specific attacks directed toward medical doctors. Do doctors make mistakes? Yes. Are doctors often overconfident? Perhaps. Dr Hertz speaks in broad platitudes that might make you feel good about yourself, but you really have to ask even in the case when the doctor overlooks the tumor, would you rather have someone who has been trained for years to diagnose tumors examining the test results, or should we 'democratize' the process and take a poll of people off the street as to whether or not there is a tumor? Furthermore, I don't think anyone actually uses her definition of an expert (as someone with an advanced degree), as most would consider mechanics, plumbers, and carpenters experts in their field. Is an advanced degree an indicator of expertise? Yes. Is everyone with an advanced degree always an expert? No. Her message about skepticism and a desire to be informed is healthy, but we cannot go too far in the other direction and blindly dismiss experts either. Her message should not be about 'rebelling' against a concept (a dubious task at best) but about discriminating between experts and those who call themselves experts.
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Cory Warshaw
Posted over 3 years ago
We spend 3 billion hours a week as a planet playing videogames. Is it worth it? How could it be MORE worth it?
As a gamer I wish people would appreciate the level of art and complexity that goes into a game. A good game must have striking visuals, as well as a compelling stories and/or characters, all while having novel and entertaining gameplay. Even for what most consider a straightforward shooter like Halo, there is a wealth of mythos and character design that doesn't actually make it into the game. But above all I would like people to recognize how this a new medium to tell a story, in a way previously impossible. In a game like Half Life 2 or Bioshock, the main characters never even say a word. Instead the player becomes the protagonist, and every level shapes your image of the character's wants and desires. Ultimately instead of reading about a plot detail or watching it in a movie, you are experiencing the plot first hand. Games like Mass Effect take this idea so far that your choices influence the arc of the story, making it exceedingly personal. It took a long time for photography, or movies to be recognized as an art form. But it is my hope that eventually people will recognize games as well. Lastly, people have to understand that there are a lot of different types of video games, and each type brings something different. Even games with little to no story can be valuable. Real Time Strategy games like Starcraft 2 tax your decision making speed and multitasking abilities to the max. Whereas a puzzle game like Portal makes you think deliberately before you act. To answer 'What I get out of games?' I would reply it depends what I want to get out of them. There are people who play World of Warcraft to escape from reality, but there are also people who play in an intensely social manner. Personally I enjoy a good story and I enjoy getting good at something, so games that meet those needs I like to play.