About dany

Bio

I am a lover of the human experience. I seek to create or nurture a world in which self-preservation and the common good are not mutually exclusive, but in fact deeply and inevitably interconnected.

I operate on the principle of Sawubona- Ngikhona, a Zulu greeting which means "I see you, I am here", we bring each other into existence by acknowledging one another and taking the time to see and praise the divinity and miracle of our existence.

I see you and your warrior spirit. I see you and your brokeness. I see you and your beauty. I see you and your struggle. I see all of you, and I hope you know you are already enough as you are, right this very minute.

Languages

French

Areas of Expertise

social justice, International Health, Gender & Identity, Gender and health, Peace & Human Rights Issues (Relating ethnic conflicts)

An idea worth spreading

Good intentions are not a good enough indication of the effectiveness of a poverty alleviation program. People are the experts of their own experiences, so listen to them

I'm passionate about

disrupting the status quo, social justice, sustainable development, body acceptance

Talk to me about

sustainability, spirituality, how I can make room for you to be all you can be,

People don't know I'm good at

listening to my intuition. It never fails

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

182498
dany masado
Posted about 2 years ago
Jackson Katz: Violence against women—it's a men's issue
You know what this reminds me of? one episode of Grey's anatomy where a male doctor got disfigured by a female doctor when they got in an argument. He was beaten so badly that he wind up in a coma and needed surgery to recover. When he woke up, he decided to press charges but Karev (another doctor) told him that when a girl hits you, you take it and shut up. If he tries to press charges, his name will be dragged through the mud and he won't practice anywhere. The point here is that while Jackson in his talk encourages a paradigm shift, he still puts an emphasis on men as perpetrators. We need to have a healthy conversation about male victims and female perpetrators without feeling like it will take away from violence against women. We are all in this together. No perpetrator should get a pass, all victims should be free to come forward and be heard
182498
dany masado
Posted about 2 years ago
Jackson Katz: Violence against women—it's a men's issue
As an activist fighting against gender violence, I am really in love with this talk but at the same time I think it could have gone a lot further. Gender violence as we understand it today is extremely heteronormative with a penchant toward women as the victims and men as the perpetrators. But what about same sex gender violence? what about violence in lesbian and gay couples? what about violence of women against men? I think it is of vital importance that we take this paradigm shift as far as we can and make room for all victims and prosecute all perpetrators. We need to make room for male victims of violence (whether the violence came from a man or a woman) to be able to come forward and get the help they need (though he certainly made that point, which can easily go unnoticed). We need to make room for a definition of gender violence that is not exclusive to women only because violence against anyone should not be tolerated.
182498
dany masado
Posted over 2 years ago
The Kony 2012 Controversy: Does this discussion apply?
I agree with you Marquis, that campaign was pure marqueting genius and while we were busy branding it as slacktivism, we should have been studying how they did it and why people responded so much. Other non-profits could learn from it, though they might want to avoid the white savior complex that reeked in the video
182498
dany masado
Posted over 2 years ago
Dan Pallotta: The way we think about charity is dead wrong
I understand what you mean by that but having been raised in a collectivist society, saving myself or choosing myself is not separate from caring for my family or for the world. I couldn't be happy if I didn't have enough money to take care of my family, nor could I be happy if I didn't work hard to ameliorate the world in which my future children will be born. And quite honestly, my wanting to save the world isn't as noble as it sounds, given that I do it because it gives me a sense of purpose, despite the guilt aforementioned in my first comment
182498
dany masado
Posted over 2 years ago
Dan Pallotta: The way we think about charity is dead wrong
This talk seems to say everything that I have been facing as a young woman with a background in global public health, who is dedicated to designing poverty alleviation projects. Having grown up in Cameroon, Africa, I had that upbringing where we are told we are responsible for one another and must take care of one another. For me this meant going to medical school so I get a high salary job and take care of my family. Unfortunately, I went in the direction of public health because I derived my sense of purpose in addressing poverty and social injustice. Everyday I struggle to justify my choice because the non-profit world does not pay as much as medicine would have paid me. I struggle to justify whether I did the right thing in investing my energy caring for the world rather than caring for just my family. The economic sacrifice of working in the nonprofit world makes me feel so guilty because my family could be better off, and yet I cannot think of another way to use my skills because I feel a sense of purpose and a sense of mutual responsibility for my fellow humans. I couldn't stop with my activism if I tried, because I think about social injustice the way most people think about their favorite team's stats or their favorite celebrity's latest antics. What's a girl to do?
182498
dany masado
Posted over 2 years ago
Ernesto Sirolli: Want to help someone? Shut up and listen!
I'm denying that hygiene promotion is effective, I'm merely pointing out the fact that as a public health trained activist, I went to Ghana believing that the studies I had read for my research papers provided me with a fairly accurate picture of the state of water and sanitation in developing countries. My stay in that region of Ghana quickly taught me how important it was for me to listen to the community. People were aware they needed to drink clean water, they need to filter or boil their water, and needed to wash their hands. But what good was all of that education if the boreholes and pumps in the village were locked, firewood was scarce, as was the water during the dry season. It didn't matter how much they knew about good hygiene if they lacked the resources. When I went to Kenya on the other hand, the community where I worked did need a combination of education and provision of resources. So the lesson remains to listen to those you wish to help. And more precisely for me, it's important to listen with humility and respect without patronizing the people
182498
dany masado
Posted over 2 years ago
Ernesto Sirolli: Want to help someone? Shut up and listen!
This is by far one of the best TED talks I've watched to date. It resonates with me both as an activist and as an African girl because I myself, have committed those same stupidities while wanting to help my own people. I recently traveled to Ghana for research on water and sanitation, and I went with the firm belief that I would teach my people that clean water is good, teach them how to filter that water. Turns out that education on clean water wasn't what they needed, it was resources to clean water, it was access to clean water that they needed. It was a wake up call, a dose of humility for my own "diaspora savior complex". This talk is everything for me because it encapsulates the metamorphosis of my activism, and I'd like to think that I'm better for it, and still learning
182498
dany masado
Posted about 3 years ago
can we reform the discussion surrounding gender inequality?
Michel, if you read the short paragraph introducing this conversation, you will notice that I did point out there are issues that men are facing which don't get enough spotlight, and this is why I welcome people to engage in a conversation where these issues can be addressed. I am glad you are remind us to give attention to the other side too
182498
dany masado
Posted about 3 years ago
can we reform the discussion surrounding gender inequality?
very well said Debra. This is the reason why I asked what we will tell both our sons and daughters when in the adult world, we are pitching one gender against the other. Remembering that we might have children of both genders helps put in perspective the pressing need to acknowledge issues from both sides