Bill Cromie

Founder & President, Headliner.fm
Brooklyn, NY, United States

About Bill

Languages

English, French

Comments & conversations

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Bill Cromie
Posted about 4 years ago
LIVE CHAT With Damon Horowitz: When have you realized that you were wrong about what you once thought was right? June 8, 2011, 5-6PM EDT
well, I think there are many different ways people can change their minds, however I think the most interesting changes are the ones that are about the fundamental ideas of what is right or wrong, not something like photosynthesis. Say i were to come into contact with information that shows me that my understanding of photosynthesis was completely incorrect. I would approach that information from a completely different perspective than if I were to come across data that showed me that human beings were inherently evil (I don't believe this, and I haven't come across any such info, this is just for arguments sake). One is some piece of knowledge that I learned (in essence, I argued my way into my beliefs about how photosynthesis works) The other is a challenge to my beliefs about humanity, myself included. I think the more interesting type of change of perspective is the more fundamental change, and I think it is made possible when our sense of self isn't at stake. It's sort of paradoxical: the more you consider yourself a Democrat or a Republican then less able you are to think critically about political questions.
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Bill Cromie
Posted about 4 years ago
LIVE CHAT With Damon Horowitz: When have you realized that you were wrong about what you once thought was right? June 8, 2011, 5-6PM EDT
I've changed my mind about a large number of things in my life, however, most of those things were ideas that I came to from the basis of study, from a position of ignorance moving into my understanding through analysis, questioning, science and study. I have a feeling that these aren't the sorts of change of heart you are interested in. Well, there is a great saying that you can't argue someone out of an idea they didn't argue themselves into. We establish a relationship with our ideas that becomes increasingly emotional and attached to our identity. It is these types of ideas, the foundation, that are so hard to change because we don't view them as inherently changeable. We meet contrary data with hostility because we treat them as challenges to the validity of our identity. I've found that my ability to change my mind about the big things is directly correlated to my conception of myself. When I identify myself with an idea, a moral stance, a political party, or a fundamental principle instead of enabling me to have a more nuance perspective that process of identification actually hinders real thought on the subject. It has been those moments when my sense of self detaches from outside labels and identifications that I found myself most able to change my mind about the things that really mattered: to realize that I might be fundamentally wrong was no longer a crisis of identity but a chance to explore and grow.
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Bill Cromie
Posted over 4 years ago
What are the effects of taxes on motivation and productivity?
RE government inefficiency: It isn't clear to me that government inefficiency is greater than the profit margins of business. Take a look at this article from alternet: http://www.alternet.org/story/149725/vision:_how_small,_mostly_conservative_towns_have_found_the_trick_to_defeating_corporations?page=entire Essentially, the crux of the argument is that small towns sold their utilities to corporations, expecting greater efficiency, lower prices, better services, etc. They discovered that when you factor in the profit margins the for businesses extract, they were getting a radically worse deal than the state run utilities. This is the problem with the whole idea that business is more "efficient" than government.Business is not organized around providing the best service at the lowest cost, businesses extract profits, which, when you consider them in the context of a utility, are waste. Business is only more efficient if the profit margins are less than the "inefficiency" of the government service.
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Bill Cromie
Posted over 4 years ago
What are the effects of taxes on motivation and productivity?
Tim, This is a fairly standard concept when it comes to talking about income and investments. When you start to study Macro Economics, it's how taxes are thought of in a purely theoretical sense: all income is taxed the same: corporate, personal income, capital gains, etc. However, as you dig deeper, the rational behind the distinctions is that the source each type of income has variable multiplier effects on growth. Investment is largely one of the best drivers of growth, and as such, it's enshrined in the tax code as being a more highly desirable form of income, as in general, it creates jobs, growth, etc.
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Bill Cromie
Posted over 4 years ago
What are the effects of taxes on motivation and productivity?
Tax on consumption is essentially a regressive tax, whereby those with the least income end up spending a larger portion of their income on taxes. Regressive taxes are problematic for many reasons, but perhaps the reason that might appeal across all income levels is that regressive taxes act as an accelerator on inflation, whereas progressive taxes act to damped inflationary pressures: think about it, as the dollars is worth less, incomes rise, and as incomes rise, larger portions of those incomes (in fact, all progressive taxes) are returned to the government. Income taxes on the other hand mean that when you earn more money, you actually earn more money, even if a larger percentage of those earnings got to the government. If you find me someone who would turn down a half a million dollar a year salary because their taxes would increase, I'll eat my shoe. Investments typically have more to do with capital gains taxes and corporate taxes. That said, look at states with some of the highest corporate income taxes: New York and California. They account for almost 20% of the entire US GDP, with a little over 10% of the population.
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Bill Cromie
Posted over 4 years ago
What are the effects of taxes on motivation and productivity?
Well, would you? Lets do the math: Average hourly wage in the US: about $19/hr Overtime wage is time and a half, so it's $28.50 Percentage Taxes on an yearly income of $19/hr: 25% if you are single. taxes paid on the hour of OT: $7.13 taxes paid on hourly for regular time: $4.75 Income/hr OT: 21.37 Income/hr regular time: $14.25 Would you honestly not put in the extra hour of overtime? You are already selling your time for $14.25/hr. Lets imagine it bumps you up to the next tax bracket! the next tax bracket is 28% for income over $82k/year. Now, an important thing to note is that you only pay the extra 3% taxes on income over $82k/year, so, lets imagine that you are one hour over, so your hour of overtime is now worth $7.98 in taxes and $20.52 in added income. I don't know about you, but I'd work the extra hour, if I could.
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Bill Cromie
Posted over 4 years ago
What are the effects of taxes on motivation and productivity?
In no way are taxes an inhibitor of motivation and productivity, at least when it comes to startups (which are the number one driver of job growth in the US ) This is proven out when you take a look at the startup hubs in the US, and throughout the world: they tend to be in higher taxed regions/states. California, New York, Massachussets, none of these are income tax haven states. If income taxes were a major inhibitor of motivation and productivity, one would imagine that New Hampshire and Texas would house the startup hubs. Instead, if you look at startups in the US and around the world, they tend to be where you have high quality public education, better social services, and generally more of a safety net. Take a look at this article from INC magazine about startups in Norway: http://www.inc.com/magazine/20110201/in-norway-start-ups-say-ja-to-socialism.html Tax havens are just that, tax havens where the wealthy go in order to avoid paying taxes, not productivity centers.