Aissatu Sila

Institute of Science and Technology of Guinea-Bissau
Bissau, Guinea-Bissau

About Aissatu

Bio

I'm a leader, but I'll follow you if you inspire me.
I'm a manager of people, things and situations.
That's not just what I do very well, it's who I am.

I love success. My life has been full of interesting challenges that made a confident, fast learner problem solver.

So far, I've lived in four countries and I speak five and a half languages. I look forward to increasing those numbers in the next years.

I'm very curious and find it hard to stop once I'm motivated. And I'm often motivated.

My main goal right now is to join (or create) a company that allows me to help accomplish big things while developing my skills and becoming the person that I want to be.

What else should you know about me?
I enjoy watching movies, documentaries and TED Talks. I read and travel as much as I can. I like fishing, even though I haven't caught a fish yet. I also write short stories and cross stich.

What about you?

Areas of Expertise

Africa Business Management, Women Empowerment, Strategy & Leadership, Human behavior and motivation, e-learning / education , ICT Business Development in Developing Countries, STRATEGY & VISIONING, West African affairs, TIC & Education, Self -Development & Coaching

I'm passionate about

Life, people, details, nature, ideas, the past, present & future, cultures, traditions, dreams, children and childhood, businesses, innovation, technology, society, causes and consequences, ...

Talk to me about

Anything at all.

People don't know I'm good at

Cross stitching.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

165594
Aissatu Sila
Posted over 1 year ago
Geoffrey Canada: Our failing schools. Enough is enough!
I was smilling thoughout the whole talk. As someone who has taught (but is not a professional teacher), I can relate to everything Mr. Canada said. There is so much potential in people but schools are mining their/our future! I believe the same challenge applies to all schools in the world and we all have to contribute to change, either as students or parents or teachers.
165594
Aissatu Sila
Posted over 1 year ago
Can donor funding really fix African challenges, or should we empower African communities to address their own challenges?
Hello Darren. I disagree with you. The root of the problem is definitely not related to desertification. Africa is the most fertile continent, with 60% of the world's uncultivated arable land and more arable land than the continents with the highest populations. It is hard to grow food in many regions (cold and hot) of the world, so that is not the problem. As for the lack of education and infrastructures, yes - governments are inefficient, but we must not forget that the majority of African countries were colonies until 60 or less years ago. After centuries of colonization without relevant investment in education, there is lot of work to be done in order to catch up with the rest of the world. As for population sizes - you should research more. Families are larger because 1) a high percentage of children die very soon, 2) one's children are one's labor force and 3) there are no contraceptives available at large scale. The land resources are not limited, their exploitation is. Bottom line, the problem is leadership - once governments start doing their work, things will improve radically. Cheers!
165594
Aissatu Sila
Posted over 1 year ago
Can donor funding really fix African challenges, or should we empower African communities to address their own challenges?
The answer is no. That's not just my personal opinion, it's the reality - a reality in which I live. I'm from Guinea-Bissau and I know for a fact that although donations can have a very big impact and help solve many issues, they are not the solution mainly because they cause dependency. I recently discovered the work of Dr. Dambisa Moyo though interviews on several Youtube channels and I can't wait to read her book "Dead Aid". I make her words mine and I wonder how come African governments are not listening to her and other smart Africans that have been trying to shed the light on this issue for years. It saddens me that so many African leaders are educated but corrupted. Other who have real solutions are either killed or powerless. I deeply appreciate individual donations to global causes, but isn't it convenient to the Western governments to keep funding our dependence and underdevelopment, so they can keep exploring our resources? How do we get communities to transform the future? By educating them and providing a stable economy in which they can prosper. As Deekay Mgbekemdi said and I agree - it's a leadership issue. Once we have the right leaders, we'll follow the right path.
165594
Aissatu Sila
Posted over 2 years ago
Chris Anderson (TED): Questions no one knows the answers to
Maybe these universes are so far away for a good reason. I think it is great that we (humans) haven't yet found intelligent life from other planets and galaxies. Why? Well, look at what we have been doing to our own kind for milenia! IMO, unless they're 'smarter' than us, we would probably start a war with them, tryning to dominate or enslave them as we keep doing to our fellow humans. Why not focus on our own planet a little more than we focus on space exploration? We know so little about our oceans, about ourselves? We are such complicated animals...