Lope Gutiérrez-Ruiz

Founder / Co-Director, The Gopher Illustrated
Austin, TX, United States

About Lope

Bio

Arts manager, editor, writer and co-founder of Gopher Magazine, the Por el Medio de la Calle festival, and the Platanoverde Foundation, a platform for emerging artists in Latin America. Founding member and partner at In-House Int'l, a design and communications studio based in Austin, TX. Currently working on City Script: Austin, a project that connects storytelling and public art in a massive scale. More info available at: weareinhouse.com and gopherillustrated.org .You can reach me at: lope [at] weareinhouse.com or lope [at] gopherillustrated.org

Languages

English, French, Spanish

TED Conferences

TED2013, TEDGlobal 2012, TED2012, TEDGlobal 2010

An idea worth spreading

Being part of a community means that supporting others is as important as supporting yourself.

I'm passionate about

Cultural Management.
Publishing.
Visual Arts.
Literature.
Latin America.
Design.

Talk to me about

Arts and Culture, Magazine Makin', Latin America. Latin America and the USA.

People don't know I'm good at

Making pancakes, my girlfriend likes to say that I'm a "pancake whisperer".

My TED story

It all started in Oxford as a TED Fellow in 2010!

Comments & conversations

180159
Lope Gutiérrez-Ruiz
Posted almost 3 years ago
What do organized communities achieve more efficiently than government? What could they achieve?"
Yep, it brings to mind the Okupa movements that have existed for decades in Spain and other countries in Europe, which create self-sustaining "squatting" (it obviously depends on the legal interpretation) communities; they're a referent in my work, but as a movement they seem unable to achieve their legal and political goals. I still wonder about the future of Occupy, winter and Wall Street notwithstanding.
180159
Lope Gutiérrez-Ruiz
Posted almost 3 years ago
What do organized communities achieve more efficiently than government? What could they achieve?"
This is a great question - without a doubt it is a communal effort to effect change around an issue. But does that make it a community? In a sense it seems to me that communities can organize around an issue, but I also think they have to be fleshed out to be called "a community". I think that it's that power of unity, and the potential to support multiple (potentially unrelated) ideas in time is what makes it a community as such and not just a movement. What are your thoughts?
180159
Lope Gutiérrez-Ruiz
Posted almost 3 years ago
What do organized communities achieve more efficiently than government? What could they achieve?"
Hi Sebastian! I agree with you about motivators for community engagement born of need or desire for a common goal, but so often, despite a great deal of potential motivation, there is no engagement. On the flipside there's also the hope that though these types of motivators spark community action, that the community itself is strengthened through other forms of engagement so that future collaborations could take other forms (say, a neighborhood festival, a food fair...) Only tangentially related to this last paragraph are the crowdsourced initiatives by city govt's to solve problems, I'm particularly thinking of transportation initiatives: http://www.fta.dot.gov/planning/programs/planning_environment_8711.html
180159
Lope Gutiérrez-Ruiz
Posted almost 3 years ago
What do organized communities achieve more efficiently than government? What could they achieve?"
Hi Samantha! Now that you and Adam mention the Occupy-* movement and news, one thing I'm curious about is outreach. I remember that on a previous thread in TED Conversations somebody brought up the problem of "empathy fatigue", the fact that we're connected to so many people and initiatives that it becomes harder to empathize with anyone beyond our closest circles (family / friends). In your opinion, how can Occupy keep being a relevant movement as time passes?