Mukesh Adenwala

Ahmedabad, India

About Mukesh

Bio

Retired from service of Reserve Bank of India

An idea worth spreading

Always ask, if necessary insolently - `SO WHAT?'

I'm passionate about

Learning about what fires up or smothers life, individually and collectively. I think healthy skeptisim helps development.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Mukesh Adenwala
Posted 2 months ago
Meaghan Ramsey: Why thinking you're ugly is bad for you
Narcissism (kissing the mirror) is a see-saw. Too much of it provides self-sufficiency without efforts and prevents efforts. Too little of it and one shies away from the effort. How to strike the right balance has always been a problem for every culture. Ancient Sparta is a glaring example where physical looks mattered more than anything else. Right from Cleopatra to most of the US Presidents, generally the good-looking ones are the people who are given the chance to lead or rule. In all societies the marginalized class is short, dark and snub-nosed. Perhaps the answer lies in cognitive constraint: the fact that 70% of our decision making information comes from our eyes only. How are we going to challenge our endowments to serve a higher purpose?
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Mukesh Adenwala
Posted 4 months ago
Clint Smith: The danger of silence
Three quotes: "The society operates its censorship through silence." - Michael Foucault "If I speak nothing but truth, in 10 minutes, I will be left with no friends." - Mahatma Gandhi "Only a fool speaks all his mind." - Bible
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Mukesh Adenwala
Posted 4 months ago
Nick Hanauer: Beware, fellow plutocrats, the pitchforks are coming
This talk does not make much sense unless Mr. Hanauer is planning to run for presidential elections in coming years. How people best serve their self-interest by serving interest of others is an idea as old as economics itself; Adam Smith had explained it. Much later Max Weber viewed this idea in terms of Protestant ethics driving economic growth. There are several objections to the argument: Technological development renders large sections of people – the erstwhile middle class – out of the jobs they were capable of. Even if minimum wages are increased, all these people would not be part of middle class and would not be consumers that they erstwhile were. In today’s economy postmen, typists, clerks, accountants, travel agents, encyclopaedia, even assembly line workers, and so on, have become redundant, just as coachmen became redundant when cars arrived. If the government raise taxes, industries in their country would not remain competitive. And, without raising taxes, the government cannot sustain the social spending for looking after people who became redundant because of technological change. Moreover, when the world becomes a global village, the wages are driven down not only by domestic fiscal constraints but also because someone in China and India and Cambodia, and so on, is prepared to work for less – much less. Success of capitalists is essentially owed to their thrift, even stinginess. No capitalist can hope to survive if she fails to buy resources (including labor) at cheapest available rates.
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Mukesh Adenwala
Posted 8 months ago
Elizabeth Gilbert: Success, failure and the drive to keep creating
Piotr: Isn't language always that imprecise, except in a short spectrum of measurements and physics? What do you understand by her use of word "home", or "beloved vocation" for example?The example given by you can also be treated as imprecise in the similar vein. What one can mean by "activities" or "social positions", for example, would differ widely. Not much in life can be defined and yet we generally end up conveying what we mean to each other.
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Mukesh Adenwala
Posted 8 months ago
Elizabeth Gilbert: Success, failure and the drive to keep creating
Frankly speaking, I wonder how many of us really love something more than one's own self? Not me, in any case. Such love for anything at all (except, as rightly said, something other than addiction and infatuation) is, in my opinion fruition of growth process, which, does not occur readily and certainly does not occur in all. Indeed all fruits that are ultimately ripened and sweetened do so because of standing naked in the sun that they were exposed to. But for every fruit that is ripened and sweetened, there are many that have failed to ripen.
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Mukesh Adenwala
Posted 8 months ago
Jennifer Senior: For parents, happiness is a very high bar
Amen. After all, that is what one says when one hears a prayer. I am, however, of the opinion that people are trying to make their kids more perfect, forgetting that we, the humans, are neither designed to be nor supposed to be perfect. But more relevant to the talk, yes, self-esteem and happiness can be taught. Happiness is an interpretation that one gives to the imperfect world and self around oneself. Self-esteem is the result that one derives from the happy living. Parents, even when they know the specific goal to drive the child to, which often they don't, instead of telling the child something that the child could do for his or her `own good' should give acceptance to the child. That proximity to unflinching support seems to do the trick. I have heard (including here on TED) so many stories about children with severe physical and mental limitations excelling in one endeavor or the other. And behind every such story there has been a parent (usually the mother) who stood like a rock behind the child. In Mhabharata, the epic, there is a story of battle between Duryodhana of Kauravas and Bhima of Pandavas. When Duryodhana asks for blessings, Gandhari, the mother of Duryodhana, who always wore a blindfold on her eyes, tells her son to stand before him naked. Her blessings in the form of her benevolent sight would turn her son's body into an impenetrable fortress, the story goes. This epitomizes the age of wisdom that it is the mother's benevolent acceptance of the `true' (naked) self of the person, that provides protective layer to the child. It is with such protective layer that one can feel self-confident, which forms the basis of self-esteem. And it is such self-esteem that forms the basis of happiness.
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Mukesh Adenwala
Posted 8 months ago
Christopher Emdin: Teach teachers how to create magic
When I was young I had seen several people selling on street their medications for anything from common cold to sexual dysfunction or even tooth powder. Even today across India one can find fortune tellers that would invite with their eyes and engage with their words to earn their daily bread. The magic the speaker talks about is also described in the art of selling. I wonder if it is everyone's cup of tea.
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Mukesh Adenwala
Posted 9 months ago
Ziauddin Yousafzai: My daughter, Malala
One more problem with Eastern societies is that generally no one can speak to anyone without trying to touch the tender core of emotions in the other person. The messages get washed away in flood of emotions that forms the core of the conversations.
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Mukesh Adenwala
Posted 9 months ago
Ed Yong: Zombie roaches and other parasite tales
Nice, sharp and witty talk. One question that can be safely put aside is that of a free will. Do parasites have them? Well, for the present, I would answer with an emphatic `no'. Do the alcohol has free will to intoxicate us may be a silly question but do the plants have free will to grow towards light may not be as silly - and yet we can immediately answer the same question quickly, and with as much certainty that I did. The next question is more important. How do parasites affect our behavior, motives, inclinations, etc. Asking such questions and trying to find answer is the main endeavor of science and forms its proper realm.