Simone Barros

Stochastic Artworks, LLC.
Brooklyn, NY, United States

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THE FOREST COURT, Ten-Minute, stage play, 2009

Logline: When a judge is kidnapped, beaten and blinded, he is then cordially invited to preside over the Forest Court. A grotesque menagerie of the crimes in the animal kingdom unfolds and the judge must sort out who should be led away to the slaughter.

Genre: Theatre of the Absurd

Premise: What is the difference between domestication and evolution? In a trial measuring the two, is man the judge or the plaintiff?

DATING GODFREY, One Act, stage play 2009

Logline: A night spirals into mayhem and transgressions when three girlfriends wait for one’s boyfriend to get them into an ultra-exclusive NYC lounge. As the night expires into a wonderland of nightmarish proportions, the very existence of the yet to appear boyfriend comes into question.

Genre: Theatre of the Absurd

Premise: Belief is a waiting game. Some will wait; some will wonder and wander and some will stand erect on their own two feet and stop waiting.

JUST ANOTHER POP STAR, Feature Length Screenplay, (workshopped with Spike Lee): screenplay, 2009

Logline: How does a dimwitted, quixotic, buxom teenage girl come to rule the world? Through pop stardom! But how far her star will climb, is up to the compromises she makes: trade a little privacy for box office draw, a little dignity for A List status, a little sanity for mass appeal and a little murder for a lifetime of fame.

Genre: Satirical Comedy

Premise: What is fame worth? Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall and still, others rise to the misery of us all.

A Few Times A Few Others Liked My Work:
* CPAC Creative Workforce Fellowship Second Round Finalist 2009

* Nickelodeon Writing Fellowship Workshop Grantee 2008

* Televest Daytime Drama Writing Fellow 2005 & 2007

* Literary Arts Film Festival selection, Director “News Bulletin from the Desk of World” 2001

* NYU Dean Craft Award, Writer/Director, NYU Film Festival for “Falling in the Night” 2000

* Martin Scorsese Film Grant, Writer/Director for "Falling in the Night" student film 2000

* Tisch Film Production Grant, Writer/Director for "Falling in the Night" student film 1999

* Mastery of Directorship & Cinematography, Director/Cinematographer for "Beneath the Surface" 1998

* Benjamin L. Hooks/20th Century Fox Scholarship, for NYU 1996-1999

Areas of Expertise

Dramatic content

I'm passionate about

The story of it all.

Talk to me about

Theater, Theoretical Physics, Green Technologies, Humanitarian Design & Organization, the Human Genome, Genetics, Quantum Physics, Magic Realism, Postmodernism, Cartesian, Jungian and other philosophy

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

Noface
Simone Barros
Posted almost 2 years ago
Is autism, or some types of autism, an evolutionary effect.
Autism and other syndromes are diagnosed based on a series of conditions so as difficult as it is to specifically define, it is as difficult to give a cause or track an increase.  The 11% increase best measures an increase in diagnosis. It's entirely possible that the incidence of these conditions have not increased but simply went undiagnosed in the past.  That being said I can't imagine that we aren't currently evolving.  Autism alone won't indicate our evolution nor will the insignificant mutations found  in some Olympic athletes or blue eyes. This small genetic difference doesn't make us different enough to fulfill the technical definition of being a different species and although there is such a small genectic deviation between humans and the other great apes, chimps and humans are different in a way a person with blue eyes and a person with brown eyes are not. The most curious detail of the Juan Enriquez TED Talk that brought me to this discussion is that unlike the several co-existing species of other life on this planet and evidence of co-existing multiple human species in the past, why now is there only one?  One originating in Africa that migrated throughout the world? Also currently Africa remains the most genetic diverse population of humans? So if we're evolving, we're evolving there.  Is our evolution like our single species status, a natural anomaly? Is our evolution aided by there being only one species, making us biologically more tenacious to survive? Or did consciousness which brought awareness of differences bring volatile interactions between the multiple human species very like much like current racism and genocide leaving only one species standing?  It would seem that consciousness is a significant cognitive evolution, so yes, the discussion of mental evolution is most motivating.  It must be occurring as the pattern of evolution seems a ceaseless aspect of life. Will the leap of the next evolution of humans result is the gap of communication?
Noface
Simone Barros
Posted almost 2 years ago
Larry Smith: Why you will fail to have a great career
I totally agree with Ivan. He didn't say attitude wasn't a factor; he clearly stated that it wasn't the only factor. Unfortunately other factors thwart the most positive of attitudes, lest we forgot the most positive of attitudes who suffered and died in Rawanda, the Holocaust, and US slavery. The most salient part of his comment was learning to dominant your surrounding rather than being dominated by them. This talk was colorfully deliver but proved insipid and banal, failing to give any true insight. Let's explore those who discovered a passion, committed to it courageously, diligently and tirelessly worked toward it, demonstrated the talent and intelligence mastering their field but still failed. I am one of those stories and I know I'm not alone. Is there no insight for us because the saddest thing about my lot is that we will never stop this pursuit and die paupers in a deficit of finance and sanity.
Noface
Simone Barros
Posted almost 2 years ago
Larry Smith: Why you will fail to have a great career
I totally agree with Ivan. He didn't say attitude wasn't a factor; he clearly stated that it wasn't the only factor. Unfortunately other factors thwart the most positive of attitudes, lest we forgot the most positive of attitudes who suffered and died in Rawanda, the Holocaust, and US slavery. The most salient part of his comment was learning to dominant your surrounding rather than being dominated by them. This talk was colorfully deliver but proved insipid and banal, failing to give any true insight. Let's explore those who discovered a passion, committed to it courageously, diligently and tirelessly worked toward it, demonstrated the talent and intelligence mastering their field but still failed. I am one of those stories and I know I'm not alone. Is there no insight for us because the saddest thing about my lot is that we will never stop this pursuit and die paupers in a deficit of finance and sanity.
Noface
Simone Barros
Posted over 3 years ago
Nina Jablonski: Skin color is an illusion
The illusion is that it means anything more about you than the court of melanin in your skin. Many people assume how a person will speak, what kind of house he or she has, the music the person will like, the talents and skills the person has and the list goes on. Granted this talk was titled after the very hot topic of the illusion of race but we'd be remiss to deny here are illusions about how deep the distinction of skin color goes.
Noface
Simone Barros
Posted over 3 years ago
Nina Jablonski: Skin color is an illusion
Dermot, is being larger a reaction each individual has to a more reliable food source? I don't know that it's the same as traits that mark evolutionary changes. Remove the reliable food source and the individual is immediately smaller, shorter right? What environmental element could be removed that would return humans to hands without opposable thumbs? None. No matter what, humans are born with opposable thumbs. This seems to be the different task in understanding evolution and discussed here by Jablonski - what are fundamental trait differences and what aren't. It would seems skin color is not a fundamental difference.
Noface
Simone Barros
Posted over 3 years ago
Nina Jablonski: Skin color is an illusion
Allan, please read M. N'vaaf's and David Olsen's comments here of the Esquimaux vitamin D rich diets. M. N'yaaf makes a good point about mating behavior. Understanding evolution, speaks to the reality that first the mutation must pop up, then those with the mutation must pass that mutation on at higher rates than those without the mutation. The Esquimaux may not have experienced vitamin D deficiency due to oral consumption of vitamin D as well they may have considered dark skin beautiful in a way Europeans did not. Even prior to interacting with Africans, Europeans hailed light complexion and people with more fatty tissue because it was a sign of wealth - not working in the fields or eating rationed diets. Their playboys were littered with Pillsbury Dough girls not Pam Anderson, so to speak. One thing is clear from Jablonski's presentation, skin color is well, only skin deep, easily mutable, ever changing, widely varying and relative.