Dan F

Jacksonville, OR, United States

About Dan

Bio

I live in Oregon

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Dan F
Posted 8 days ago
Jim Holt: Why does the universe exist?
I am a universal nonbeliever in these mystical connections. I do not deny the human creative genius that has generated inspiration and followers which have generated epic movements, yet for me it all simply unravels under the illumination of a free and open mind to the beauty of empirical evidence and the spin off of these riches reflected in the sciences.
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Dan F
Posted 14 days ago
Jim Holt: Why does the universe exist?
Why is there something rather than nothing, let alone the perplexities of our own existence - enter the philosopher. With equations to help give us some direction: 1) God + nothing = world 2) Blank + nothing = world 3) Science + nothing = world The first equations is a consequence of the fact no one had a cell phone. We were in the process of becoming less primitive primates as we began our upright journey. The second equation is trying to divide by zero. The third equation reflects that empirical evidence provides direction, order, knowledge, controls, etc., etc, that helps us better appreciate and define the concept of nothingness as we indulge in our exotic physical and cultural evolving circumstances that perhaps best reflects reality. Never has there been a more enlightening time for the curious of the mind.
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Dan F
Posted about 2 months ago
Ze Frank: Are you human?
It appears to me that was his intent. Perhaps Ze Frank is simply conveying that taking a more honest an accountable inventory of our own individually acquired mixed bag of assets and liabilities is what enables us to better address and more truly reflect what it means to be human (in the best sense of the word).
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Dan F
Posted 2 months ago
Ze Frank: Are you human?
I agree with you in that I felt the impact of what seemed an artful intelligent message. To some extent we are who we have become. A particular personal act(s) may result in personal wealth and other desirable individual circumstances, yet at some unjustified cost to what we want to value in one another and hopefully ourselves. A classic tale (with great films versions), "The Count of Monte Cristo," in my mind makes this reality dramatically come to life with satisfying settlement. "Are you human?" - in our modern world this may be an all the more relevant question to contemplate.
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Dan F
Posted 2 months ago
Ze Frank: Are you human?
Most of us prefer to consider ourselves objective and apart from the issue(s) at hand, regarding TED TALKS, etc. But is it not the more subtlle subjective nature of this inquiry that reflects our human side and whether we want to admit it or not - does that fact not somewhat flavor our "objective" view of things more than we may consciously care to admit, or even realize? It appears to me, Ze Frank is reminding us of our private personal internal side and perhaps the value of the virtues we have preserved, via a superficial, yet noticeably interesting mix of light humor and less humorous prodding of our distinctly individual human condition. Excellent dissection.
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Dan F
Posted 2 months ago
David Chalmers: How do you explain consciousness?
Perhaps the ultimate head game! The definition of consciousness to me on a personal level is a meaningful and precious existence, which appears to be only temporary on the world scene. This individual miracle of my own existence was not concocted, but arrived at from the dynamics of the tree of life. Although, my existence appears unique to me, it appears to to independently shared with many others in the past and present history most characteristic of humanity, but reflected in other species of life as well. In terms of comparative consciousness, humans appear to have a distinct advantage over other creatures because we can open a book, etc., and expand our knowledge, perspective, beliefs, etc., artificially. This implies our consciousness isn't purely biological, although it obviously affects limits in terms of memory, perception, capacity, etc,. In attempting to explain consciousness, it seems best appreciated in terms of viewing it as a dynamics consequence of life and cultural interactions. The knowledge of how, what, why and where our mind appears to function and operate has attracted some of the brightest among us, as has the origin of life, yet significant mystery remains in play. I think there will be a time(s) when we perhaps learn more than some among us even what to know, or believe as evidenced in the Scopes Trial.
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Dan F
Posted 2 months ago
Karima Bennoune: When people of Muslim heritage challenge fundamentalism
Courageous reflections of the instances and need of moderates to stand up and fight back, but - it needs to be adequately acknowledged that there are aspects of human behavior that spin from the traditional and cultural demands of the Islamic religion which often flourish at what many would say is the darker side of mankind. I think it is that reality that makes it so unlikely to expect any tolerance toward fellow citizens whom fail to comply with those that run things. The Islamic belief system is rigid by practice and tradition. Islamic nations by definition rule under that designation and consequently impose this lifestyle across the country. This ongoing widespread suppressive mode of governmental control makes me proud to be a U.S. Citizen. My favorite holidays are memorial Day and the 4th of July. Unfortunately, it appears to me that this existing suppressive mode of national behavior will continue to grow and strengthen for the foreseeable future.
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Dan F
Posted 3 months ago
Paul Bloom: Can prejudice ever be a good thing?
HI Theodore, Perhaps I'm splitting hairs, but here goes. As noted by the speaker "prejudice" can be justified to be a word that has a more neutral and valuable side than its hotter connotation associated with race relation, etc. As a noun the social context of discrimination is most commonly used to describe someone who acts unfairly, unjustly, etc., against the interests of someone's race, etc. Has this socially hot meaning hijacked the more neutral side and perhaps more valuable side of this word as well? The value of this word may best be illuminated by appreciating the nature of critical thinking, or thought. In this use, does not the knowledge and ability to discriminate not enable the brightest among us to excel and shine - to get the highest score, to develop an ingenious invention, etc? I do not mean to detract from the need to be civilized toward and with one another in our interactions.
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Dan F
Posted 3 months ago
Paul Bloom: Can prejudice ever be a good thing?
I like Ted Talks that aid some of us to better understand ourselves, or perhaps even others with insights that are helpful in the goal to be a better person both inwardly and outwardly. It would be interesting to hear Paul Blooms comments about "discrimination" (another socially hot word). In science the ability to discriminate is often the crux of what the professor is attempting to get the student to convey on exams regarding how data and facts , etc., are to be construed, interpreted, etc. Lately, I have gotten into the habit of listen to these Talks the register, more than once, and find that there is even more to digest.
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Dan F
Posted 3 months ago
Simon Anholt: Which country does the most good for the world?
Is it really possible to generate this kind of goodness in humanitarian conduct out of generalized group think, or attitude? Especially in light of so much world wide desperation due to poverty, ignorance and superseding religious dictates - not to mention powerful vested interests in preserving things the way they are. I do agree with the Anholt's point that it is important to look outward in addition to the natural inward concerns any given society is blessed or cursed with in terms of its own assets and deficits. See TED TALK by Jarred Diamond. I don't think many reasonable individuals would argue that we are not only affected by those within our nation, but are affected by the other nations (via globalization) occupying and impacting Spaceship Earth as well. A nuclear exchange between nations was a serious concern for a number of years and is far from a resolved concern now, especially in terms of an isolated act of terrorism, which could produce incredibly scary and negative consequences. Ultimately, is it not the consequence of strong and effective leadership that offers the best hope for improving the state of any given national union and this fact will help dictate the consequences of globaliation in terms of the net affect of this interaction. I actually prefer the words "more accountable" over the notion of goodness because good can be so arbitrary and motivated by mysticism over reason. Is it not more likely that being a good (more accountable) nation may mean imposing restrictions on one another that could only be accomplished by effective and strong leadership? The leadership challenge and argument being that we must make this sacrfice and change to better (more accountably) serve future generations. It is important to note that Idealism is a wonderful concept, but could be self defeating in the real world without concurent globalied adjustments from others.