Bill Bruehl

Seneca, SC, United States

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Bill Bruehl
Posted 2 months ago
Uri Alon: Why truly innovative science demands a leap into the unknown
I'm a theatre guy; I taught improv for thirty years. The fundamental rule "yes and" basically means that you find something in which you are given that you can build on. You may take it to a new place, but you accept. It's like saying, "I take your point, and..." I have had many acquaintances who are scientists who never do that, who always look for a way to denigrate or attack what you have given them. It is a terrible habit, one that crushes relationships, and encourages hostility, and does nothing toward solving a problem. Improv actors are not the only ones who accept what they are given. Jazz musicians do the same thing. The best conversations are built on the same principle. There is always a way "to take one's point" and move on with it. Try it the next time you lecture. Listen closely to any one who disagrees, you will find something, someway to take the point of some part of that disagreement and build on it. Even if you accept the shadow side of what your opponent gives you, you are accepting, saying yes and moving on.
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Bill Bruehl
Posted 4 months ago
David Brooks: Should you live for your résumé ... or your eulogy?
I hope for a little more wisdom in many of those who would comment on this talk by David Brooks. It is but another expression of the ancient wisdom of yin and yang. There is nothing parochial about it. Ponder what he has said with an open mind. It is about the balance we can find within, a balance that leads to contentment and the greater success life affords. It is not about good and bad. Open yourselves to Brooks' ideas. You'll not regret it.
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Bill Bruehl
Posted 8 months ago
Stephen Cave: The 4 stories we tell ourselves about death
I think this fellow's ideas will change if he manages to live into an old age. Many of my friend -people in their late 70s or older, express no fear of death only of suffering. This is also true of the warrior who enters the battle fearlessly, something many warriors who have survived say is the only way to enter the battle.
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Bill Bruehl
Posted 9 months ago
Sally Kohn: Let’s try emotional correctness
Yes. Our culture has a lot of problems with compassion. Many confuse it with absolution, think of it as weakness; when really it is the Golden Rule. When our leaders and spokesmen lead us with fear (as they have for the last dozen years and more), we distrust each other and armor ourselves against each other making empathy and compassion disappear in our relationships with each other.