Fabio Buffa

West Point, VA, United States

About Fabio

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Fabio Buffa
Posted over 2 years ago
How does the sum total of ALL US healthcare costs compare to the sum total of ALL US health insurance premiums paid by Americans, annually?
Neil, Great hearing from you. And here of all places. LOL So we have it: Civil rights= not needed for human health and happiness, BUT helpful in establishing/maintaining societal equilibrium, social justice acquired by citizens through political action, (at least in a democracy) can be withheld from citizens through political action by opposing factions enforced/by government once established Human Rights = unalienable, protected by the constitution, (in theory) absolutely required in order to have health and happiness Not bestowed by any power or authority other than shared human experience, This is a hasty and rudimentary attempt at defining the two kinds of rights, based partially on your post and my thought responses to it. there is probably some overlap. Revisions from any viewers are welcome. Just copy and paste it into a new comment with your revisions. I think I will make this a new question for discussion and post the link here later. Stay in touch!
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Fabio Buffa
Posted over 2 years ago
Should we clone and revive Homo Neanderthal?
While I agree that the life of this child, or population might be a cruel one, it is only because it would effectively be a "test subject'. But if the science claiming H Sapiens interbred repeatedly and successfully with Neanderthals is true, then the differences between the species are superficial at best, and social integration was already happening long ago. So the issues of parenting, care, ethics, socializing and medical training may actually be moot. Or at least, they may be issues that our species has dealt with before, perhaps even successfully. While you paint an almost cinematic picture of one possible life of a cloned neanderthal, I believe that many other scenarios could be explored. To say the child would grow up in such isolation is dramatic in light of the science claiming our shared genetics (and the implicit social integration) with Neanderthals. You're playing on our heart strings to get us to agree with you in this scenario. In anything like your scenario, yes the act of cloning would be an ethical abomination. Tantamount to human torture. But other scenarios could be attempted. Ones where the "subject" is never treated as a subject at all, but as the human cohort they may have always been. Should other scenarios be attempted? Maybe, but not for a long time, and not till we have other planets where we can send an entire neanderthal colony.
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Fabio Buffa
Posted over 2 years ago
Should we clone and revive Homo Neanderthal?
Challenging what is believed based on new observations is at the heart of science. Science challenges itself by definition. Galilleo challenged the church and was incarcerated, but he didn't stop doing "science". He didn't do what he was told. He challenged the authority. In doing so, he changed the world for us all, removing one more of the shackles the church had on the collective human mind. Science IS challenge. Anyone in science who is not challenging himself/herself, a peer, a teacher, an elder, a congregation, a courtroom, another scientist or any other authority is NOT doing science!
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Fabio Buffa
Posted over 2 years ago
Should we clone and revive Homo Neanderthal?
Is there not sufficient evidence that Neanderthals did interbreed with modern H. Sapiens? If this is true, then a number of the concerns about cloning them may not be a problem at all For one both, the two species are unlikely to be more than superficially different if viable interbreeding can occur and those offspring can also reproduce successfully. Modern humans and Neanderthals would have had to overcome behavioral and cultural differences in order to breed and raise children. (rape instances not included) IF mixing occurred, then it's probable that some social/cultural mixing took place as well. (i.e. H. Sapiens born to and raised by Neanderthals, and vice versa). Even if sometimes by force or necessity. It seems the two species had to have been similar enough to address their differences in culture, family, education, behavior, and ethics. So cloning them may prove to be as simple as cloning an entire population and integrating them with humans from birth so that In fact, if we did breed with Neanderthals, then aren't they already present in innumerable ways? Mightn't we find that what we learn from a clone is redundant and anticlimactic? and at such a high ethical price too! and how much would we learn about ourselves and our world from Neanderthals, that we can't learn from focusing on the real social problems before us? Problems that threaten to leave US extinct, if left unaddressed! One of our problems is that our discoveries are accelerating our ability to dream beyond our ability to comprehend (or care about?) long term, global consequences. We may want to slow down on the cloning, but we definitely should keep talking about controversial and groundbreaking technologies. The more we discuss these questions, however "esoteric", the more likely we are to proceed with caution, with ethical guidelines and with hopeful solidarity!
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Fabio Buffa
Posted over 2 years ago
Paul Stamets: 6 ways mushrooms can save the world
Hi Margaret, and Hi Paul. Such Great talks from both of you. Thanks for sharing your beautiful wisdom with us. A recent TED convert, I have only just begun to see how many minds there are to commune with out there who have shared interests with me in terms of stewardship, philanthropy, and collaboration. Seeing your talks had a profound impact on me in a time when I felt we are indeed pushing the earth beyond its limits. It's comforting and motivating to have found a community where these values can be seen in action. Thanks to both of you and the entire TED community. Keep up the revolutionary work!
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Fabio Buffa
Posted over 2 years ago
Julia Sweeney: Letting go of God
@ Patrick Guilfoyle...This sounds like the pot calling the kettle black. HAving not lived through Ms. Sweeney's life, you are about as ignorant of her position as you claim her to be. You cannot know the ways that god may have manifested himself to her in her unique human struggle, to say whether she or you is more enlightened. Suffice it to show God's love as we should even unto our enemies. IF you would make a criticism, shouldn't it be about a specific incident or instance, instead of an emotional response to your own bias about someone challenging your belief? It amounts to petulant name calling and is antithetical to the love god would have us show our brothers and sisters.