andrew lindsey

Silverdale, WA, United States

About andrew

Bio

Born and raised in Washington state. I left for a year and a half for schooling in South Carolina and now work out on Kitsap Peninsula.

An idea worth spreading

The things that make the world good are not bought in stores, nor recieved in the mail. The things that make the world a worth while place to live are good people. Raising the next generation of human beings and ensuring that they are not just able to make it in the future, but also want to make it a future worth being a part of is the priority of every human being.

I'm passionate about

Good parenting.

My TED story

I'm 23, and was turned onto Ted conferences by a friend of mine. As much as large scale American media churns out blood and misery, Ted seems to counter by inspiring hope. The ideas, the people, and the quality in each conference remind me that not everyone in the world is a psychotic gunman at a museum, or an evil company with profit crushing morals and ethics. This is one bit of hope for the future of humanity.

Comments & conversations

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andrew lindsey
Posted over 3 years ago
Eric Whitacre: A virtual choir 2,000 voices strong
I am so happy to live in this time. To see the world be connected on this level is beautiful. Behind the backs of the media fear mongers, the conspiring politicians, the polluting corporations, and the rhetoric spouting pundits(pardon my own rhetoric), a web if forming. A fragile web made between those that have been made to think that the world is so divided. Beneath the walls we make around our hearts the roots of our soul explore for commonality. My hope is that when the web is strong enough it will hold fast against the falling bricks of the toppled walls, and be the network that the forest of humanity can rely on in the coming times.
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andrew lindsey
Posted over 3 years ago
A world without religion, how will it really look?
Religion is the sculpting of aspects of reality you cannot see using the human experience. Prophets, books, eyewitness accounts of miracles, these are fundamentally human centered occurrences. The goal of science is to remove the human perspective from the equation, or more simply, to make it so no matter who you are, where you were born, what you believe in, you too can add vinegar and baking soda and watch the reaction.
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andrew lindsey
Posted over 3 years ago
A world without religion, how will it really look?
FYI it wasn't scientists who decided to copyright seeds, it was politicians (the majority of whom in this country are "christian"), who were in turn influenced by businessmen. Raw science has interest in accountability and morals, they are called ethics boards, and they are in place for most scientific research. That is why experiments like the stanford prison experiment, or the little albert experiment would never be allowed nowadays. Einstein regretted his letter to FDR suggesting the weaponization of fission until the day he died. Morals do not come from faith, they come from the fact that if you are a monkey and you kill another monkey for no reason, you get booted from the tribe. Faith is control through seduction (heaven), or fear (hell).
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andrew lindsey
Posted over 3 years ago
Dan Dennett: Dangerous memes
For the rare few with sufficient patience to read all the way down to my comment, thank you for restoring my faith in humanity by participating in this discussion. Ted is labeled in my bookmarks as "Click here for hope" and rightly so.
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andrew lindsey
Posted over 3 years ago
Cynthia Breazeal: The rise of personal robots
Ah every time I see some news article about what politicians are doing and get in the dumps, all it takes to pick me up is a good TED talk. Its like happiness at the touch of a button. Thank you TED for restoring my faith in humanity on a daily basis.
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andrew lindsey
Posted almost 4 years ago
Diane J. Savino: The case for same-sex marriage
John Calhoun did an interesting study on population density with rats and found as populations become more dense the "natural" order tends to break down. Though the wiki article on Calhoun doesn't mention it, the study itself found increased levels of homosexuality in the population as it grew. I guess what I'm trying to say is that as the human population creeps towards 7 billion, is it really any suprise that with limited natural resources and space that we should start to experience some of the side effects that naturaly occur in dense populations? I realize the study also found other problems, many of which we have laws against, such as child abuse and domestic violence, not all of the behaviors were violent or would even be limited by the most conservative of human societies (see the "beautiful ones"). So in conculsion, in the spirit of internet sarcasim and trolling that started this. If you want to end homosexuality, kill yourself and reduce the population.