About Graham

Bio

Founder of LifeEdited, Graham Hill brings years of visionary startup experience to his projects. In 1995, he co-founded one of the first Internet consultancies, SiteWerks, building it to sixty staff before selling to Bowne in 1998. In 2003, he married his environmental consciousness with the then new blogging platform to launch TreeHugger.com, still one of the web’s top eco design and news sites, sold to Discovery in 2007. Graham began LifeEdited in 2010 to translate the ideas of TreeHugger into design and architecture. The company is now working with real estate developers around the world, designing and marketing a new breed of home that packs big function into small spaces. LifeEdited’s prototype apartment was featured in the NY Times, Dwell, Wired UK, Daily Mail UK, Gizmodo, CNN, NPR, Today Show as well as a top read/emailed NY Times Op Ed called “Living with Less. A lot Less”; videos of the project, including Graham’s TED Talk, have been viewed tens of millions of times. The apartment received the AIA Honor and Architizer A+ Awards. In 2012, LifeEdited, as part of a team led by Jonathan Rose Companies, was chosen as a finalist in the Bloomberg administration's adAPT NYC competition, which sought out the best designs for New York City’s first micro-apartment building. LifeEdited is currently working on several high rise projects in New York, Toronto and Sao Paulo.

Graham has been on the cover of Inc Magazine, given two TED Conference talks and is one of Fast Company’s “100 Most Creative People in Business”. In addition to running LifeEdited, Graham is CEO of wearehappytoserveyou.com, which produces a ceramic version of the iconic NYC anthora paper coffee cup. Please follow him @ghill and sign up for the LifeEdited newsletter.

Graham has a Bachelor of Architecture with distinction from Carleton University in Ottawa and did advanced studies in Industrial Design at E.C.I.A.D, Vancouver. Graham has lived all over the world and his biggest eco-sin is air travel (offset of course). He speaks English, French, German and Spanish.

Languages

English, French, German, Spanish

TED Conferences

TED2016, TED2015, TED2014, TED2013, TED2012, TED2011, TED2010, TED2009, TED2008

Areas of Expertise

Web, Green, Small Living, Kitesurfing

An idea worth spreading

campaign finance reform.
longer term thinking.
bicycles.
takoyaki.

I'm passionate about

kitesurfing. surfing. powder. do-gooding. design. small business. non-fiction.

Talk to me about

behavior change.

People don't know I'm good at

Backspins.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

8923
Graham Hill
Posted over 3 years ago
Graham Hill: Less stuff, more happiness
Absolutely! Sharing systems are a big part of LifeEdited...in fact critical. Check out The Mesh by Lisa Gansky and Collaborative Consumption by Rachel Botsman and Roo Rogers. With the sharing systems of the future, we can store less stuff at home, have more/better options, save cash and reduce our footprint. In 15 years, ownership of most things will be for suckers.
8923
Graham Hill
Posted over 3 years ago
Graham Hill: Less stuff, more happiness
Clearly, when you add more people/pets etc you need more space. As I say at the end "I'm not saying everyone has to live in 420 sft". We plan to do a slightly smaller one for a bachelor and a larger one for a couple with kids.
8923
Graham Hill
Posted over 3 years ago
Graham Hill: Less stuff, more happiness
I think this idea is mostly about being conscious of the decisions you make. You may still elect to have a bunch of x stuff, for example I love kitesurfing and will have a bunch of gear tucked away. Art is important to society and ideally should be part of every apartment. I'll definitely get some in there!
8923
Graham Hill
Posted over 3 years ago
Graham Hill: Less stuff, more happiness
I heard a great quote from, I believe, a Toronto architect: "Small fridges make great cities.". In other words, when people have to get out to the market, they interact more regularly and it makes the city more vibrant. Absolutely agreed on backpacking or travelling in general. You can pack light and then still realize that you didn't use a bunch of the stuff.