Tony Kieme

San Gabriel, CA, United States

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Tony Kieme
Posted over 2 years ago
Wingham Rowan: A new kind of job market
Henry Ford introduced the industrial production-pipeline that streamlined the workforce (despite the work conditions and child-laborers). Meanwhile, the administration went from a warehouse of gridded desks towards cubicles (invented by Henry Miller), a radical idea at the time. The internet and wireless communications-technologies then transformed business into an allusion of independence, an almost autonomous work-ethic. Today, the employee is as important as going viral for a moment, or as important as an appliance. The creation of jobs can stem from a civic-need, a social-need, or a capital-need. A civic-need can be very communistic in that the protocol for access is universal in design; perhaps a lottery or distance may determine the timing of employment for those involved. A social-need can be very socialistic in that the creation of jobs is an institutionalized affair -- a school or court or fire-station for example. Finally, a capital-need is very capitalistic in that the cultivation of further jobs (than the initial business) is dependent on the profit of the business. I will call this triptych of needs a Trilateral Stewardship for the sake of discussion. A Trilateral Stewardship would explain how a dynamic job-market can function. A city would have certain responsibilities to provide employment in mostly civic-needs and social-needs, sometimes choosing capital-needs for risky gambles. (The advertising billboards of a city would be a lucrative source of income.) The city is in effect responsible for the employment of every inhabitant, newly born or arrived or graduated. The risks taken by individuals and other businesses are only options, likened to elective-classes in college, unnecessary for sustainability, but duly desired by many individuals. Every city in the world should function this way, demanding a certain legality to residing in the city as would be expected, a visa-esque policy. I imagine that the job market is much more than Keynesian.
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Tony Kieme
Posted over 2 years ago
For our nation to issue its own currency and cease using the federal reserve or central bank model.
Of course, the issue of currency is a difficult charge to reconcile in an easy manner. There have been many writers, thinkers, politicians and futurists that agree upon a mono-currency for the world sometime in the future. The question today is then about how we will develop a national infrastructure for currency regulation, so that a mono-currency would adapt accordingly to each national modality. I describe the problem in this way to suggest that a devised system of scale for currency is necessary before the consideration of interest-bearing loans or the size of any debt. Imagine that scale is the issue of management and regulation for financial considerations --person to person, city to city, state to state, nation to nation. In each category, the fiscal-transactions are regulated based on the scale of "borrower" and "loaner", not the dollar amounts. This designation of scale can afford a greater degree of accountability of the monies necessary for civil-needs, as well as internalize the management of each expense with a new criteria. Bernie Madoff said that "if the national economy was an oil-tanker, the entire ship was filled with oil instead of individual barrels". The designation of currency-types could also benefit fiscal accountability even further; imagine if there was a currency for energy, health, education, entertainment, food and rent. Each individual would carry a certain type of currency more than another, as would each city and state. It would become quickly obvious what is being spent more and what is being spent less. Furthermore, the prejudice of class and wealth would become too complex and personal a matter, hopefully rendering each individual's spending habit as a true lifestyle choice --better meals rather than higher-education and so forth. Each city and state would have a city-style or state-style based on these currencies. You should watch "Fixing the Future", a PBS program. It describes functioning sattelite-banking systems today.
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Tony Kieme
Posted over 2 years ago
Is "the state" our enemy?
First, the "state" is a tool that is under utilized for whatever reasons there may be --ideological, mythological, political; an extension of the body-politic. The "state" is an enemy inasmuch a gun or car or phone is an enemy. Second, to have the capability of advising our representatives, the body-politic does need a language of representational definitions that can be accepted and understood at both the political-level and the citizen-level. For example, a "sustainable infrastructure irrelevant of economy" could indicate a necessary taxation and expense schedule that does describe how survival for the nation and its citizens are relatively guaranteed in a way that is not present today. This example also does indicate the tacit benefit of transparency in spending and expenses in order to devise a thorough and accountable plan or program. In total, what the body-politic and the "state" may need is a program for long-term efforts so that the discussions that occur in the domestic home and in the political arena coincide quite well indeed: a New American Plan. Third, in regard to your opinion about voting as "entertainment" or "real", a management position is obviously necessary when the many are concerned. The opacity of political affluence in general (media and standard operating procedures) may indicate a passive desire to forget or forgo the responsibility of such a job, implying a trust that is oftentimes questioned by someone such as yourself. The desire to impose an entertaining characteristic is simply too subjective a consideration given the objective nature of the job despite the rhetoric infused in political hubris, often necessary to fulfill said opacity --national security and so forth. I would rather ask, is national security a problem if the nation's spending habits were disclosed entirely, so that the discussions would be less rhetorical and more pragmatic?
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Tony Kieme
Posted almost 3 years ago
Lisa Kristine: Photos that bear witness to modern slavery
(Thank you, Lisa Kristine, for taking the risk and effort and photos to produce such a marvelous essay.) Slavery is about money despite this incredible atrocity. Money in spirt is intended as a bond of trust among its users. Money today has become ubiquitous in value --a perceived-value in first-world nations, one that is oftentimes interchangeable at will. Considering the amount of atrocities around the world, money is in need of major constraints and regulations because of its ubiquitous applications. How then can money be altered to provide the hinderance for such 'free' market activities as slavery? Can money be enforced for certain uses? Let us imagine that the trading of any ore, mineral, liquid or chemical can be exchanged with only an assigned currency --for example, a resource-currency. This resource-currency would be regulated in some way. The black market would yet again conduct business, trading in another currency, to then exchange for the said resource-currency. However, here, the black market would suffer a significant loss in profits, due to the disparity of value between currencies, rendering any nominal effort for slavery as something not desirable; human-trafficking is not a viable business practice. Yet the problems of any slave-profit still remain. Here are my final thoughts: - food and shelter must be provided for all before any ongoing atrocity can change outright - a role in society for all can maintain peace (suggesting full-employment) - education for all offers different opportunities (suggesting freedom) In conclusion, a significant change in global, fiscal protocol can halt certain markets for a short time, so that a new sustainable infrastructure for food and shelter can maintain a peaceful interest in a different direction than before. Without this dialectic between finance and creature-comforts, atrocities are bound by the ease in which dogma can rein supreme; there is no conscience when children are born into an atrocity.
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Tony Kieme
Posted over 3 years ago
Paul Gilding: The Earth is full
(Excuse me, I did not see the video before writing the following.) First, the general public (of the world's population) is focused much more on their 'exceptional-life' status of their daily lives than the feasibility of solving the world's problems at home or in their neighborhoods. The concerned-public must accept that this distance from any global-problem is a problem with the perception of scale and influence, oftentimes gilded by media and entertainment as a "forget-me-not" that can be forgotten with ease. Second, any global solution must address barriers: psychologic-barriers of habit and comfort; infrastructure-barriers of progress and economy; culture-barriers of language and representation. These barriers take a tremendous amount of time for any effectual change or shift. A paradigm-shift takes time. An economic-shift takes time. A culture-shift takes time. The problems (and perceptions) of the world are about the scales of time. Lastly, if the scales of time is at the crux of solving the crises of the world, then the world-populous must see and think and imagine these solutions through the ensuing generations of humans (not in one lifetime). Bureaucratic institutions, societal conventions, business industries; these large entities are thusly asked what duties and responsibilities are considered for each generation, rendering a larger plan that is in question, not the hubris behind the spectacle of any one crisis. In summary, the thinking behind global-solutions must be made from a wide array of perspectives. What does a neighborhood citizen and a major CEO have in common everyday? How do these commonalities make any generational-sacrifice worth participating? The psychology of the individual, the immediate society, and the world are each separate problems of perception to define -- perhaps invent. Our species needs serious solutions for the starving, and entertaining ideas for the living. It takes generational-time for real communication to happen.