Jonathan Locke

Chief Architect, Telecommunications Systems
Seattle, WA, United States

About Jonathan

Languages

English

Areas of Expertise

Software Design and Architecture, Acting, Story Structure

An idea worth spreading

We don't need full employment to be happy. Rather than having 10% unemployment right now, we could instead have full employment with everyone working 10% fewer hours. We need more job sharing and we definitely need a benefits and health-care system that supports part-time work.

Comments & conversations

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Jonathan Locke
Posted about 1 year ago
Kevin Breel: Confessions of a depressed comic
A great talk. I believe that most chronic depression is rooted in one or more environmental causes (and I mean this in the more general sense that includes food and water) that trigger illness in genetically susceptible individuals. In particular, I think mold toxins are the biggest disease vector since the virus and something that we're just barely beginning to discover. Diet is also extremely important, particularly refined foods and sugar (eliminate them!). Change your environment radically and it may simply go away. After decades of depression, it did for me.
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Jonathan Locke
Posted over 1 year ago
Rob Hopkins: Transition to a world without oil
You're joking of course, but you've really put your finger on the problem. When we live long enough to be forced to behave better out of self-interest, things will change. I think that life extension for the ultra rich will do exactly this. Today, the ultra rich have little more incentive than the rest of us to behave and in fact they don't generally behave any better than the rest of us and squander massive opportunities to further their own selfish sort-term interests. Fast forward 100 or even 50 years and it may be possible with $1B or a $100M to extend your life dramatically. If one lives only 70 years, a lot of the world's problems are not personal problems. But if you are looking at living 200 or 300 years or indefinitely, suddenly something very abstract like global warming becomes a deeply personal threat. I doubt that human nature is going to change enough to save us, but the self-interest of the greedy may eventually be aligned with the planet simply because the greedy will live so much longer than the rest of us.
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Jonathan Locke
Posted over 1 year ago
Peter Attia: Is the obesity crisis hiding a bigger problem?
Yeah, you'd think that we would write a prescription to clean up the air and get out in the sun rather than dumping a semi-hormone that we don't really understand into the food supply for all people on a long-term basis... but you'd be wrong. Not saying I believe D is bad for you, but until this is resolved I'm not going to be eating anything supplemented with it. I can get enough from fish and the sun.
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Jonathan Locke
Posted over 1 year ago
Peter Attia: Is the obesity crisis hiding a bigger problem?
In a normally functioning body, you are correct about all of this. I think what you're failing to see is that in certain kinds of hormonal illness, the "calories in" get mis-filed where they cannot become "calories out" later. The body is not processing these calories correctly. It stores the calories and sends giant signals saying "you're starving for calories eat now!", because hormonal interference have rendered it incapable of retrieving and processing the energy [normally]. Changing your diet will not fix this problem. I know. I've been there and done that extensively and it does not fix the problem for all people. It's possible that there are some people who are simply lazy, but my belief after experiencing all this madness myself is that it's very easy for a normal human body to balance calories while it's nearly impossible for a body where energy processing and hunger signaling have gone crazy to do the same thing. I agree with you that it CAN be done (although probably only for a limited period before falling apart), but you have NO IDEA how hard that would be because you obviously have normal hormones and therefore no experience whatsoever. NOTE: Couldn't respond to Graham below. He's right. I did overstate the case. It's a matter of degree of failure to store and process, although when you collapse from walking this seems to be a pretty fine point to me! In general, there are levels of gray here. These hormonal failures are not a binary switch, or as you point out, you'd simply die. The level of hormone disruption determines the level of failure. In Biotoxin Illness, cells are *hypoxic*. Not non-oxic. The degree of the glucose burning problem will be in proportion to the level of hypoxia because oxygen is required for glycolysis.
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Jonathan Locke
Posted over 1 year ago
Peter Attia: Is the obesity crisis hiding a bigger problem?
I think you are oversimplifying and ridiculing a very complex issue that it's just possible you might not understand fully. Just to give one example of how hormone pathways can affect the input/output equation: in Biotoxin Illness, toxins bind to and damage leptin receptors in the brain. This causes both leptin resistance and a whole cascade of hormone failures that lead to a hypoxic state where cells are unable to efficiently burn glucose. That's right: the base-level energy system of your entire body is dramatically affected! I've experienced this so called "push/crash" phenomenon personally and if you're normal, you cannot even imagine fatigue in this ballpark. It's not just worse than running a marathon, it's on another level entirely. We call it "fatigue", but there is no common word for it. And until it happened to me, I would have laughed at the idea like you. The closest thing to this "fatigue" would be extreme hypoglycemia to the point where you'd need to sit down to avoid falling over from even walking or standing. But the failure doesn't stop there! In this mode, since the body can't burn sugar, it attempts to burn fat, which it cannot do either since leptin resistance is shoving all the energy into storage where it can't be burned and so the body winds up burning protein. The big picture is this: when the normal metabolic paths of the body fail to store and burn energy correctly, the calorie I/O equation is still technically valid so long as you don't expend much energy or eat much food (because it will all be ignored and erroneously stored). Try to do something significant and your whole body will quite literally crash. When I was very sick from this syndrome I would crash from *walking* and take several days to recover from it. Now that we've identified and treated the problem I can run 3 miles no problem. From your response its quite clear to me that you have a normal body and a limited imagination for what other people might be experiencing.
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Jonathan Locke
Posted over 1 year ago
Peter Attia: Is the obesity crisis hiding a bigger problem?
If you don't mind my saying so, although I can understand the desperation (I've experienced it myself), I'd resist far-out and badly-defined ideas like "energy medicine" like the plague. It sounds like you have a scientifically well-understood problem with bio-toxicity that's treatable. By all means, do some spiritual things if it makes you feel better, but I'd stick with well-qualified and science-based doctors and not do a bunch of other strange things on the side.