About Thaniya

Bio

Thaniya currently leads TED's growing team of product developers and UX extraordinaires. She is responsible for turning TED.com's digital visions into reality through strategy, product development, collaboration, design, and development. Thaniya joined TED in early 2010 where she created the product team as well as spearheaded all mobile development efforts for TED. Her passion lies in the intersection of human-computer interaction, design, and behavioral economics. Her work has been recognized by numerous awards, including Emmy, Peabody, Adobe MAX, and Webby. She is a fan of management through influence.

Prior to this, Thaniya was Director of Product Development at Major League Baseball Advanced Media, where she was primarily responsible for MLB's popular real-time game tracker, Gameday, as well as all major live-streaming video products and other live game experience applications. Thwarted early on in her ambition to attend art school, Thaniya went on to complete degrees in decision science, computer science, and a Master of Science in management at Carnegie Mellon University. Prior to joining TED's dynamic team she has assumed the roles of software engineer as well as user experience designer for over 14 years working with many Fortune 500 companies and start-ups alike.

Languages

English, Japanese, Thai

TED Conferences

TED2014, TEDGlobal 2013, TED2013, TED2012, TEDGlobal 2011, TED2011, TEDWomen 2010, TED2010

Areas of Expertise

Product Development and Innovation, Media Technology & Web 2.0, User Experience Design and Web UI Development, Ramen, Turning lemons into lemonade, snowboarding, Cooking, Surfing (The Ocean)

I'm passionate about

Progress. Design. Culture. Food. Contributing to society's greater good.

Talk to me about

Snowboarding, Ramen, Backpacking, User Experience Design, The future of Internet, Behavioral Economics, Robots, Folklores

People don't know I'm good at

identifying ingredients in things I eat

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

121417
Thaniya Keereepart
Posted about 3 years ago
LIVE TED Conversation: Join TED Speaker Alice Dreger
I suppose in an idealistic and hopeful world, anatomical differences will have positive effect on democracy. I sure hope that people who have lost a limb have the same equal governmental right and representation as those with all the limbs attached. Same goes with sexual orientation and racial mix. That all humans are treated as humans and the right to be human extend to everyone equally. To echo David Webber's note: I think the more difficult part of this movement will be one of tolerance more than governance. I grew up partly in Thailand. The country is famous for lady boys (among many other things). I was taught by my society at large that it is OK to be born a boy yet yearn to be a girl, and vice versa. There were lots of gays, lesbians, and trans-genders. It was quite normal, actually. When I moved to the US and saw that gays and lesbians weren't seen/treated in the same light it was quite perplexing. I can only guess that any homogenous society will be less tolerant of anyone who is different in any way. Once you have more variety in the mix (race, sex, culture, androids, etc), tolerance increases over time. That sounds positive.
121417
Thaniya Keereepart
Posted about 3 years ago
Who was the teacher(s) or the person(s) who cared for you? Who was the person that ignited a spark of inspiration and learning for you?
My history teacher in high school once said "when you grow up, whatever it is you decide to do, make sure to never work for money. Make money works for you. You will be happier." Growing up in a family with a financial economist for a dad, I was more accustomed to the rules of economics and monetary theories than most children. That statement from my teacher went against everything my dad ever taught and shed light on what's really important - happiness. It changed me. Thanks, Mr. Griffith.
121417
Thaniya Keereepart
Posted over 3 years ago
What will happen to chopsticks in 1,000 years?
My prediction: spork proliferation. Chopsticks will still be around 1,000 years from now in the same way that hammers, spears, and other primitive tools are still around in modernized incarnations. However, there are other eating tools that are probably more adaptive, versatile, and user-friendly than chopsticks. Perhaps the adoption of that new tool will grow over time.. but only if there is a reason for it to grow (new tool is cheaper to make, new tool becoming a fad, scarcity in the production process of chopsticks..etc)
121417
Thaniya Keereepart
Posted over 3 years ago
What's the overlooked gem, the book I haven't read that I must?
Le Petit Prince. Yes - a children's book - but one full of philosophical grandeurs, simplified. Every time I read this book I get a new takeaway that resonates with the current events of my life. "Here is my secret. It is very simple: It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
121417
Thaniya Keereepart
Posted over 3 years ago
Should anyone be able to upload their TEDTalk to TED.com?
Curation requires trust. People come to TED to watch videos they trust are worth 18+ minutes of their full attention. The process may not capture all the substance in the world, but eliminating noise differentiates TED from most other video hub. People upload videos for a variety of reasons: some self-promotionally irrelevant or mediocre, others validly brilliant. Voting these means the TED crowd will have to now do the sifting work to find that hidden gem. I vote no.