Jeff Mowatt

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Comments & conversations

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Jeff Mowatt
Posted 8 months ago
Harish Manwani: Profit’s not always the point
When Unilever CEO Paul Polman began talking about the moral compass and the bottom line, the language was familiar. I later found where it had been shared by a practitioner. http://www.managementexchange.com/story/re-imagining-capitalism-new-bottom-line
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Jeff Mowatt
Posted 10 months ago
The day we become silent about things that matter
Indeed there is. The overall theme of what I've written is about the RICO activities described in our letter to USAID. We knew what was going on in 2006. There were photograpich records which were collated in this video 5 years later when mainstream media got hold of the story. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bp7t7SGPQ9M
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Jeff Mowatt
Posted 11 months ago
Michael Porter: Why business can be good at solving social problems
Michael Porter argues that business can be good at solving social problems. He reasons that the profit motive of business can be more effective than the NGO/charity approach. Here's the same argument in a proposal for tackling the problem of terrorism. Published and shared online in 2003, it argues for economic 'smart bombs' as a more cost effective alternative than cruise missiles. http://www.p-ced.com/1/node/32
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Jeff Mowatt
Posted 11 months ago
Michael Porter: Why business can be good at solving social problems
Dr Hariharan , I took interest in what you say because what I'm about to show you was written by someone who studied the Vedaas and told me it was among many influences on his own thinking. I quote from a development proposal written in 2003: His work began in 1996 with a paper on an alternative to traditional capitalism, today the model of social business "Creating an enterprise for community funding will work for enriching a community just as well as it will work for enriching a few people. The profit motive remains intact. The enterprise is sustainable as long as it makes a profit, just as with any other business. The main limitation is the time it will take to grow enough to provide the money needed by the community. A credit union or bank, by comparison, can make sufficient money for a community available more quickly. These can be funded immediately with sufficient money to service entrepreneurs in a community. In turn, businesses and jobs are created quickly, reducing the overall financial needs of the community. The limitation of a bank or credit union is making enough money in the process of lending money to sustain itself. This money is made by charging interest rates, which must be high for micro loans. It requires much more time, work and therefore cost to lend one million dollars among a thousand different people than lending the same amount to one person, for example. As a result, the interest rates for micro loans need to be high in order to cover the operating costs of making these loans. Even with high interest rates – up to 35% in the present case – it remains difficult to earn sufficient profits to be able to make loans across a wide region such as Crimea where potential borrowers are spread out in remote areas across the region. The cost of outreach, training and multiple visits in that process can exceed 35% interest ultimately earned on micro-loans to remote areas." http://www.p-ced.com/1/node/32
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Jeff Mowatt
Posted about 1 year ago
Why I think Dan Pallotta is wrong about charity and social business
Not evil, of course, unless willfully blind to human suffering. Yet there are a great number of charities with highly paid execs and there doesn't seem to be a valid argument for increasing them if it doesn't make the ultimate impact more effective. Humanism by means of capitalism was our own starting point. http://www.p-ced.com/1/node/38
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Jeff Mowatt
Posted about 1 year ago
Why I think Dan Pallotta is wrong about charity and social business
Peter Buffet calls for a new approach. He doesn't want to end capitalism, but introduce humanism. The Death Camps for Children story was the beginning of a social business An alternative to capitalism where humans come first. The story revealed how NGOs were coopted into silence for fear of reprisals and fear of losing donors. For many it was a story they didn't want to hear. for some a story they didn't want others to hear. http://www.p-ced.com/1/node/175
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Jeff Mowatt
Posted over 1 year ago
Dan Pallotta: The way we think about charity is dead wrong
It struck me that Dan Palotta has misunderstood social business, which to me, displaces the traditional model of captialism, wealth accumulation and subsequent philanthropy with a business in which other people, particularly those in greatest need, are the primary focus: http://www.managementexchange.com/story/changing-capitalism-people-and-planet
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Jeff Mowatt
Posted over 1 year ago
Is capitalism sustainable?
In our presentations for the Economics for Ecology conferences in Sumy we'd bee making the point that it wasn't sustainable. What I found interesting recently is that we seem to have common ground with a leading Marxist on the issue: http://www.p-ced.com/1/node/41