Artan Shabani

Pristina - Kosova, Kosovo

About Artan

Areas of Expertise

Medical Doctor

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

277513
Artan Shabani
Posted over 4 years ago
Hanna Rosin: New data on the rise of women
The speaker does not understand what being the Man means. The Man is not the one who does everything, presses others, abuses, has control over everything, dominating everything etc., the Man is the opposite and it can be a women or a man. The example of who earns more is a lamest example I have seen here at TED. Money and status do not make anyone (men or women) the Man, that is just a false temporary facade used by both insecure men and women to falsely be the Man. Another lame argument here in the comments are the examples of who does the kitchen and who moves the furniture, God, get past these childish things. Both women and men are the Man if they respect each other and love. This is the time to support each other, thanks God women are taking that role and not staying all day at home cleaning, cooking. It is about time women be more powerful, thankfully. It should have happened a long time ago, we would be balanced and definitely have better lives.
277513
Artan Shabani
Posted over 4 years ago
Jason Fried: Why work doesn't happen at work
I think there are several reasons to why the speaker is right. I like working from home. When I work at home I do not consider myself working-I have the feeling that I am free (not obliged to work), although I work like hell, I have the feeling of not being "imprisoned", watched, checked etc from the boss or whoever, so I am completely relaxed. There are times I work up to 16 hours a day and still I am not as tired as I would work in an office for 4 hours, besides, I would not even consider that working at all, I take it just as a random house activity. This spares me from traveling and having the "Ahhhh... I am finally home". Having to go somewhere to work means, having to get dressed specifically, to travel, to think where to stop for coffee, eat, waste time with people you like/don't like etc, and to stay "imprisoned" for 8 hrs. His suggestions might not be applicable for all kinds of office work, still his ideas are worth considering and applying.
277513
Artan Shabani
Posted almost 5 years ago
Simon Sinek: How great leaders inspire action
This rather seems like a War in between Win vs Mac users/supporters, and not the discussion on the point the speaker is making. He took these examples to illustrate his case, not to tell us who is more successful and who has better products. Perhaps, we should rather contribute with our own experiences and examples, thus contributing to enforce or prove wrong his ideas, which, then they would be a help to leaders and others involved in such activities.
277513
Artan Shabani
Posted about 5 years ago
Jane McGonigal: Gaming can make a better world
"It is a bit of a misdirection to imply that most MMORPG games consist of millions of people working together as a team. There are millions of players, but they are working on individual goals." I guess this is the biggest challenge, how to make millions of people with individual goals and fit them on the "overall" goal where benefits go both ways, individually and globally. On open-source software movement, probably you are right if you consider that happening in incoming 50 years, since people management would be impossible, imagine millions of people posting codes for a single project or software at the same time, if only 1 module is a virus it will break down the entire system. That what you suggest should hopefully come soon, but I do not see it happening in our lifetime.
277513
Artan Shabani
Posted about 5 years ago
Ken Robinson: Bring on the learning revolution!
Why some people seem to be threatened by Robinson's ideas? The new Copernicus is presenting us a "Heliocentric Model" while a lot of people are fanatically clinging to the "Geocentric Model". it seems to me that we are in the similar situation as in Copernicus time when very few people started acknowledging the new Theory. If you see the reports, many universities are increasing the fees and less students are to be admitted (UK especially), and Industrial Failure is causing "collateral damage" to education system. Another report says $200 000 for a degree, in that case for a mid-class family (like myself) means being in dept for another 10 years at least, for a degree of which certainty of being useless is increasing very quickly. How are we going to convince our Mid-Age-Churches (Governments/Schools/Universities -who've become money chasers) that education can be done in another way, and how can we enable them to start thinking about doing something about it?
277513
Artan Shabani
Posted about 5 years ago
Ken Robinson: Bring on the learning revolution!
I was not talking about objects at all. I cannot relate how your response is related to what I previously wrote but, anyway. To some people purposefulness-less is their purpose and meaninglessness is their meaning or passion or their path...What brings happiness to people is not my/your call. I am pretty sure that you are not completely sure what makes you happy, let alone others. Happiness amongst all attributes, is a transient event, perhaps filling the house with meaningless object for some, feeds their transient happiness.
277513
Artan Shabani
Posted about 5 years ago
Jane McGonigal: Gaming can make a better world
The truth is that there are hundreds of millions of people involved in gaming, and there will be more and more, and most probably nothing and nobody cannot stop that. I am not a gamer, and I may not understand the gaming world, but one thing that amazed me when I saw and talked to gamers, is that there is an amazing cooperation in between them, amazing trust, it is unbelievable how great they work together. It is amazing to see a million people work as a team, all for the same purpose. Does anyone know any example similar to that in real world? The point here is to take the skills from gaming and trying to apply those to real world. In simple terms, I would go as far as to say that gamers are better educated (through gaming) on cooperation, trust and team work, and maybe in many others than people going to school for the same.
277513
Artan Shabani
Posted about 5 years ago
Ken Robinson: Bring on the learning revolution!
I am gonna stay with the concert/audience metaphor again. Well, let me go very far and assure you that you would rather play an instrument alone and passionately for yourself rather than playing on it just because you HAVE to play even for a billion people audience. You'd get all the pleasure from the first and annoyance from the second. Paradigm shifts and competition are generally healthy cause they would bring out the best of you. I wonder if you asked yourself a question: "Is this the best of me?" Is this all I can do, should do? Shifting in proportions is welcomed 'cause it is never one sided, it is all sided, the more proportion shifts the more possibilities the more "best of you" uncovering; it creates more dynamic environment and forces us to get out of our bubbles, our comfort zones and "fight". My concern is, even if this "revolution" starts now, it will take (I think) at least 20 years to be implemented, and that is too late for our children.
277513
Artan Shabani
Posted about 5 years ago
Ken Robinson: Do schools kill creativity?
You should not be disappointed about it at all. It is just the diversity of people. It is the fact that education systems do not "accept". Everybody MUST study what is on the curricula. As a start this is a bad approach. Math is very creative for mathematicians and the ones who love it. It is not creative for those who love dancing, in fact it is boring. And yet they HAVE to learn it or else wont be able to graduate. And for your curiosity, go to any class and see how many students like maths, I can assure you that not more than 5-7 %, and the comments you find here are the same, perhaps 5% will satisfy you.