David Don

Lon Don Uk, United Kingdom

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Comments & conversations

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David Don
Posted about 4 years ago
When, How and Why have your most strongly held views changed?
So you have developed a cynical mental attitude. Well whatever works for you. I found your original comment very amusing. Perhaps you are not even serious, like the hypocrites you describe. The cynic is the person you wish you could be. Your cynical observation is part of reality, but the opposite is also part of the same reality. Two sides of the same coin. Which side have you chosen to focus on? Here is a post I borrowed somewhere on TED just for you: Here is an old story that might help change negative views. An old Cherokee was teaching his grandchildren about life. He said to them, "A battle is raging inside me. It is a terrible fight between two wolves. One wolf represents fear, anger, envy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority and ego. The other stands for joy, peace, love, hope, sharing, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, friendship, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion and faith." The old man fixed the children with a firm stare. "This same fight is going on inside you, and inside every other person, too." They thought about it for a minute and then one child asked his grandfather, "Which wolf will win?" The old Cherokee replied: "The one you feed."
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David Don
Posted about 4 years ago
Why is philosophy so commonly taught in prestigious private prep schools and yet so rarely taught in public schools?
I think we are all concentrating too much on philosophy alone, although it was mentioned specifically by the original question. What is important is a liberal arts education system which includes history and literature. I would personaly include psycology as well. It is the discussion in this subjects that helps create a discerning citizenry. Philosophy is just one dimension. To get a good idea of the whole human condition one must factor in all the other arts. Another point is we are not trying to make philosophy graduates, but to use philosophy as a tool to sharpen the students minds. Enable them to understand the meaning of society and their role in it. Understand Politics and how it affects them. Discuss Morality and Ethics. Contemplate Meanings and Values. This are examples of things I think are important. The problem is not what to teach and how. Different comprehensive curriculums already exist in the Private and public school system. The problem is the willingness to teach it.
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David Don
Posted about 4 years ago
Why is philosophy so commonly taught in prestigious private prep schools and yet so rarely taught in public schools?
I agree with Justen Robertson's reply. In fact I have read through all the replies and had started to formulate my own, until I read his reply which is the last post. I realised he had taken his reply right out of my brain; that thought plagiarist. The public education system is strictly utilitarian. It is designed to teach vocational qualifications and skills (I don't mean vocation as in working class skills but all manner of occupations) rather than a liberal education. It is a class problem, private schools do have a liberal education system, and the children who attend them are usually from the upper class and upper middle class. They are being educated to become future leaders and in reality they do hold most of the top jobs in the country. So education is the new guard to hold the new middle class in check. They know intelligence does not equal enlightenment. So a brilliant doctor or architect could go through life having little idea of what is truly going on. As your question pose about educating a whole generation of "critical reflective thinkers who have the ability to discuss and evaluate complex arguments on deep issues like justice and ethics", how do you think such a generation would impact the very structure of government and society. When we have a corrupt political/government system that lie through their teeth to get themselves elected. How would a George Bush be successful in using propaganda against such an enlightened populace? The power of democracy is the power of the masses, the mob. So regulating their education is in the interest of the keeping the status quo. Having a few rebels among the upper class or accidental philosophers of the lower classes is of no consequence as long as they are in control of the general populace. This brings us to the truth of the matter; public education is a system of control.
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David Don
Posted over 5 years ago
Helen Fisher: Why we love, why we cheat
I have been using SSRI for GAD for 8 years and I've been in the same loving relationship for 9 years. Her claim about SSRI's effect on Love and Libido is news to me. I laughed when I heard it and had to share the joke with my partner. Like any other normal relationship, my love grows and attachment deepens every year not to forget the sex drive; Mine is still higher than my non SSRI taking partner(typical woman eh. lil joke). I will say the alternative of not treating serotonin related mental illnesses effect on normal functions are worse. i.e relationship breakdown, loss of jobs, mood disorder etc.