Nadine H. Hafez

Student of Political Science, TEDxCairo
Cairo, Egypt

About Nadine

Bio

Political science student in Cairo, Egypt. Mainly interested in the intricate web of causal relationships between the human psychology, our history and the reflection of it all in literature.

Languages

Arabic, English, French

Areas of Expertise

Leading and managing at the same time, Organizing meetings and events, Public Speaking, Presentation Skills, Persuasion, Negotiation

I'm passionate about

Political science, philosophy, English literature, linguistics, sociology, psychology, education and travelling.

Talk to me about

Politics and current events, basketball, Jazz music, Classic Rock, Rat Pack, old movies, innovative ideas, and English literature.

People don't know I'm good at

Geometric art.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Nadine H. Hafez
Posted about 1 year ago
What's the point of novels?
I just have a question re your point on authors of novels being delusional: do you equate that with subjectivity or are they separate? i. e. would you call a political scientist who calls for an extreme ideology delusional despite their objective approach to the subject? And yes, I do believe that authors of novels are more realistic; I just don't think that necessarily has to mean that they are objective. In fact, I believe that part of why they manage most of the time to be so realistic is that they don't shy away from subjectivity and emotion; they don't treat them as obstacles to reaching, finding or describing the truth.
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Nadine H. Hafez
Posted about 1 year ago
What's the point of novels?
I don't think I have a particularly comprehensive answer to the question but I can draw some aspects to the answer from experience. I study political science and the one thing I am invested in the field in is the reflection of political theory and political sociology (along with history, psychology and a host of other related disciplines) in novels. There's an hypothesis actually that in some contexts - like that of the Arab world - authors of novels are far more capable to translate the reality in their works than 'objective' political scientists and scholars. A major part of this has to do with the 'emotions'. While there has been a trend in humanities and social sciences lately to better understand 'emotions' and deconstruct them as text and context, the methodology is not yet crystallized and therefore the same study can result in paradoxical results. Novels on the other hand rely on the emotional response of the reader and they are therefore far more apt at deconstructing the emotional makeup of a group or phenomenon, be it political or otherwise. The problem however arises in the fact that in order to translate the author's dealing with emotions into something 'practical' so to speak, one would have to deconstruct the novel itself which usually butchers the art of it all. The beauty and brilliance of novels is interrelated, they are not separate. The brilliance of relation to emotions as well as objective theories,perspective or hypotheses is also the aesthetic beauty of a reader's attachment to the characters of the novel.
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Nadine H. Hafez
Posted over 1 year ago
There exist objective moral truths
I only quickly skimmed through the responses, but I think I have a general understanding of the direction of the conversation. In my opinion, there is no full or complete objectivity on any given issue or field, ethics and morals included. I do however believe that after a contextual agreement on what counts for moral and what doesn't, a certain level of order and justice can be achieved and maintained in a largely objective manner. I actually tend to follow the classical trend of philosophy and advocate the use of evaluation in approaching political philosophy. It seems to me that sometimes the sole utilization of objectivity - as is the case in the behavioral method in political science - proves more problematic than beneficial in the implementation and maintenance of justice in the modern state of law. Thank you for bringing up the topic; I find it particularly interesting.
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Nadine H. Hafez
Posted about 2 years ago
Neil Harbisson: I listen to color
I think it's fascinating how he redefines "sharing experiences" when it really seems improbable. The fact of the matter is he never will see color, and we never will really understand what color feels like to him, because we already have an innate understanding of color that has been nurtured within us since birth. But the fact that he has an understanding of color that we, those who are not color blind, will never be able to understand, yet we all have an understanding of it really introduces a new pavement for our connection. I think the greatest I get out of this talk is almost a framework of conversation between those with different perspectives.
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Nadine H. Hafez
Posted over 2 years ago
Damon Horowitz: Philosophy in prison
I guess the question that begs is the limits of facts. I do hold a certain bias, but objectively speaking there are a lot of questions triggered by this talk that I simply cannot see another talk that is strictly facts-based triggering. Re TED being the platform, I think TED's been positioned so far as a conversation hub, where ideas come to meet. And the ideas in this talk beg some of the most fundamental questions asked since the beginning of the human existence; they start just as heated and diverse a conversation - if not even more so - as a facts based talk does.
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Nadine H. Hafez
Posted over 2 years ago
Sarah Kay: How many lives can you live?
It's really interesting how she combines quite a number of topics and issues worth discussing in this talk. This poem per se is not my favorite of hers. I do like though how she touches on the "art" of capturing, embracing and expressing, art being both a means and an end. She also touches on chasing answers and perfection, a little inclined towards discussing the philosophical "truth". And the idea of collecting stories is beautiful: A friend of mine was just talking about how collecting stories makes things clearer to him; and it's fascinating how she articulated the power of stories.
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Nadine H. Hafez
Posted over 2 years ago
Damon Horowitz: Philosophy in prison
It's amazing how so much can be said in such little time. Speaks to the importance of choosing your words and your focal points. Surprisingly enough, the focal point in this talk - or rather performance - was our "not knowing", something philosophers have written mountains of books about over the last millennia. Begs the question of whether something like this is a moment of clarity or just utter confusion on a public stage. Either way, it's phenomenal how to this day, with all the knowledge we have at hand, people still stand in ovation.
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Nadine H. Hafez
Posted over 3 years ago
Mike Matas: A next-generation digital book
I have to say I agree with Sergio. I don't see why this could not be considered the future of books. With new technology, and communication tools, I would honestly consider it a loss not to utilize them to redefine what a book is, how it's used and what it includes.
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Nadine H. Hafez
Posted over 3 years ago
Wael Ghonim: Inside the Egyptian revolution
HI, I'm Egyptian living in Cairo. Generally, English is spoken by the educated middle class section of the Egyptian population (e.g: Wael Ghonim, TEDxCairo organizers and the event's audience). I work with TEDxCairo and the reason this event was in English was because of this broadcast on TED. The prior event, speakers had the freedom to choose the language they are more comfortable with: English or Arabic. Egyptians generally tend to mix the two languages together when they speak.