Christian Martinez

Winnipeg, Canada

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71498
Christian Martinez
Posted almost 3 years ago
What is love?
Hi Shanmugananda, In your understanding, love is that "feeling," eh? Like, the butterflies that dance around in our stomach when we're in the presence of something good, true and beautiful? Thanks, Christian
71498
Christian Martinez
Posted almost 3 years ago
What is love?
Hi Jacob, I think you're quite right. Defining love is probably an impossible task, but we could touch its boundaries and know with certainty what it is and what it isn't. Always, Christian
71498
Christian Martinez
Posted almost 3 years ago
What IS religion?
Hi Barry, Dictionaries offer definitions, yes, but not exhaustively so. There is a wonderful talk here on TED by the lexicographer, Erin McKean (it's highly-recommended, super entertaining!), where she critiques the obsolete model of dictionaries. The talk was met with much fervor, and its applications are even now reverberating in academic spheres. For example, a sure way to get a big, fat F on an academic paper is to exclusively rely on dictionary citations as evidence in an argument. I am further suggesting that your claim is not grounded in truth. By priests, I wonder with whom you've spoken - I happen to be acquainted with many. Deity, in theology, claims a very specific understanding regarding the divine nature. The Romans' views of their gods were radically different from the Christian understanding. Zeus was construed as one of the gods, having particular attributes and having a particular influence on the world. His nature as a god was indeed a "deist" conception. Deity, almost like a human kind of being but with supernatural capacities (and much better-looking!), who puppeteers humans and is in control of every aspect of the world - this is not how Christians and Muslims view God. It would surprise me to hear a priest refer to Christ as a deity, truly. By all means, please explore this claim for accuracy. Or if you'd like, you can ask me questions, and if I don't know the answer I'll try to find them for you. Many thanks.
71498
Christian Martinez
Posted almost 3 years ago
What IS religion?
Hi Robert, It isn't a semantic dodge at all. I mentioned in the response Aquinas' characterization: ipsum esse. I suggest you google it. In the Christian conception, God is not - not! - simply everything that exists. That's just absolutely not it. That falls more in line with nature mysticism, like "the force" in Star Wars. If it's ingredient in the universe, by definition, it isn't God. The reason why I am claiming that we need to get these terminologies right first is because if our definitions aren't right, we're not even in the same world, haha! In a court of law, the judge, at this point, would turn to one of us and say, "uhh, counsel, you're in the wrong room." If you're defining God as "everything," my goodness, Robert, I agree with you! It's plainly not the Christian conception. Furthermore, no one believes in God BECAUSE things exist. That misrepresents the argument too. Thanks again Robert.
71498
Christian Martinez
Posted almost 3 years ago
What IS religion?
Hi Gordon, This is simply inaccurate, even irrational. Of course religions - all of them - have to be viewed in their entirety, otherwise one can't possibly make any sorts of assertions about them. I find that many critics of religion have scant knowledge about the literature, but confidently make grandiose claims about them. Reading a verse in a chapter in the Bible does not make one an expert on Christianity. What if the claim is tethered/balanced by another principle in another chapter? We could extend your logic to the following: it makes no sense to refer to oneself as a "loving" person and then proceed to destroy people's lives. A golfer who has never touched a club. A farmer who has never seen soil. Could a Christian be Christian without believing in Christ? Contrary to the caricatures of secular society, Catholicism, as an example, makes very particular claims that are very pertinent to our lives. I highly recommend informing yourself of its claims, and you'll recognize that some of the assumptions held in your response are actually not based in truth. Many thanks, C.
71498
Christian Martinez
Posted almost 3 years ago
What IS religion?
Hi Roy, Thank you so much for sharing - many would appreciate the strength you demonstrated through these experiences. I would simply submit that Church does not argue with science in the way that you construe it. The Church recognizes fully the merits of science as science. It only calls into question the claims that some people make in the name of science precisely when it deviates from its nature. Science, rightly so, can strongly make assertions about the observable, but when it questions theology, it's already beyond its reach. As soon as arguments are exchanged, science evolves into philosophy, and it necessarily goes outside of itself to keep on. That "science is right" and "religion is wrong" is not a scientific claim, but a philosophical one. In science, we present evidence and formulate theories consistent with our findings. As soon as science enters the realm of the universal, it ceases to be science. It becomes, as you say, dogma. In the end, the Church construes God as the true, the good and the beautiful. There is no contradiction between science and religion. If science demonstrates conclusively a particular thing to be true, which in turn happens to be contradictory with the Church's position, then the Church necessarily must alter its stance - this it has done many times in history. It remains the case that the war between science and religion is pure fiction, perpetualized by those who have an interest in doing so. Regards, C.