Stephen Huck

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Stephen Huck
Posted about 1 year ago
As population increases and voting rates remain extremely low, is it realistic to maintain a capitalistic democratic government economicaly?
"Capitalist" and "democratic" refer to two different social constructs that sometimes but don't always overlap. I think the idea that we are a true representative democracy, or that a true representative democracy could actually exist is, in itself, flawed. As far as the United States is concerned the study referenced in this(1) article shows that statistically, there is a far stronger correlation between the agenda of elites and government policy than the populist agenda and government policy. Specifically it points out - when the agenda of the elites conflict with the desires of the majority public, the majority ALWAYS loses. So, we don't have a democracy. As a side note, we don't really have a capitalist system either, as a large number of industries are actually controlled by colluding oligopolies, which are functionally equivalent to monopolies. We don't have a democracy, and we don't have capitalism - at least we don't have worry about losing something we don't have, right? (1) http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/princeton-experts-say-us-no-longer-democracy
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Stephen Huck
Posted about 1 year ago
Is modern technology reducing our critical thinking by "just" affirming or confirming our preferences?
To some degree yes. However, as always, it's been up to us to find a way to engage with unfamiliar ideas or those dissimilar to our own; and I think we underestimate our natural capacity to self-censor anyways. A large percentage of people would rather live an unexamined life, talking into an echo-chamber of their own making. Understanding that, modern technology [specifically, communications technology, like the internet and internet services] doesn't build that echo-chamber, but simply acknowledges that most people want to, and makes it easier for people to build it themselves.
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Stephen Huck
Posted about 1 year ago
Social structure on Mars and/or the Moon
I think the best case scenario would be to cherry-pick the most successful social ideas that are being used today on Earth. The benefit of a Mars / Moon colony scenario is they would have the opportunity to 'start fresh' and try the best ideas of their time without all the baggage, similar to the origins of the United States. 250 years later, it's easy to see all the mistakes we made, but we made something better than what existed in the 17th and 18th century elsewhere. Mars / Moon colonies could do the same.
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Stephen Huck
Posted about 1 year ago
I am looking for ideas from fellow tax payers on how we can fix the problem with funding public education.
Education doesn't have a funding problem, it has a responsible spending problem. Studies have shown that there's no correlation between improved educational outcomes and increased funding - why? Because most of it gets blown on corrupt administration. The only way public education works is to give choice to parents. Right now, schools aren't beholden to their "customers" (parents and students) at all - nothing happens if the school produces ill-educated children. Give parents a voucher credit, let them choose the school their kids go to, problem solved. Why are teachers unions so against this concept, because they are the ones benefiting from all the mis-spending on corrupt administration. We simply need to ignore their false narrative and threats about how terrible vouchers are and go for it.