About Regina

Bio

Welcome to the virtual museum and top pop gala of leading human knowledge. To me TED is the cloud gifted program, along with Coursera and edX. Contact me via LinkedIn if you feel that you have an online and international project for me: http://hu.linkedin.com/in/reginasaphier

I am a creative writer, a former live TED conference blogger, and lately a Coursera and MOOC user experience blogger (enjoyed the Gamification course very much). I am writing all sorts of things: closet play, poem, novella, blog, grant, case study, article, fable, essay, translation, in English and Hungarian, about anything (economy, gray matter, leaders, gender, being civil, emotions, films, memories, humans, social media or science). I graduated from Columbia University Teachers College in 2002, and later worked for the Center for Talented Youth of Johns Hopkins University in the US. I am the founder of Project Retour, an experimental NGO program (the outcome: unfortunately Hungary's economy, society and job market is NOT ready for its returning young professionals, therefore I closed the project for now). Today I am living the indirect leader's recluse and serene life. My blogs are luckily increasingly popular.

Areas of Expertise

MOOC Blogger, Coursera Blogger, MOOCs, Online, and Blended Learning, Social Media, The Future of Education, Social Networks, Virtual Worlds, TED Live Conference Blogger, Writing for the Web, Writing - Fiction and Non Fiction, Telecommuting

An idea worth spreading

"Vitamin" D can protect you from many illnesses, if your blood level is maintained by sufficient "vitamin" D intake from the sun, and foods or supplements, because the D hormone (!) cycle is an important component of the human immune system. Optimum and safe range according to the literature: 100 - 150 nmol/L or 40 - 60 ng/mL. "Vitamin" D might be toxic if over 10 000 international units per day are taken for months. Above 32 N latitude, you should spend at least 15 minutes under the sun at 11:00 am (several times a week), to produce over 10 000 IU "vitamin" D each time, from March to October, on sunny days. But no more per day! No sunscreen! Read more on: https://www.facebook.com/groups/keepupthegoodD/

I'm passionate about

introspecting, listening, speaking, writing essays, mentoring, learning, writing live conference blogs about TED Long Beach (TED Vancouver in 2014) & TED Global (in Rio in 2014)... and about Coursera.

Talk to me about

the live TED conferences, Coursera, edX, the future of high quality, global, online, self directed (higher) education, mild Asperger's or not being neurotypical (neurodiversity).

People don't know I'm good at

telling you where the International Space Station is right now. Also, I am good at living a really simple life.

My TED story

I have been watching TED for years. My first TED video was Sir Ken Robinson's talk. I loved the TED2010 Conference in Long Beach, California online, live & for free as an "Associate-Stream Member". I felt appreciated as a volunteer TED translator and reviewer and I have become a TED live conference blogger. TED is a surface that provides challenging, fun, often even dramatic educational materials that I am able to share with my friends via Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Skype. I am educating my nation via my TED blog and my translations. I contributed as a reviewer in three languages. After I encountered Coursera during a TED conference, I started focusing on the MOOC phenomenon and mainly Coursera (also watching edX very closely), because this is what I have been waiting for since I graduated from TC Columbia University.

http://virtualhumanism.wordpress.com
http://mytedblog.wordpress.com
http://mycourserablog.wordpress.com

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

142544
Regina Saphier
Posted about 1 year ago
Eric X. Li: A tale of two political systems
I can not accept this compliment from you: "Intellect is suppose to have clarity and purpose and you accomplish both these very well." Why? Because of the question you asked me. How can you even think of such a question? No nation ever should be exterminated. Nations, or more specifically their populations should learn from each other and become a better version of themselves. Perfection is not part of the story. Dignity, self reflection and improvement is. Plus, I am very happy that the system change happened in Hungary. What I have intellectual angst about is the fact that the change was not very deep and there is the danger of going backwards. Li's narrative is dangerous. It encourages dictators and autocrats to keep going. This is why I had to say something as a writer, as a citizen, as a human being.
142544
Regina Saphier
Posted about 1 year ago
Eric X. Li: A tale of two political systems
Another faceless commenter: you clearly did not understand my posts. I know about communist dictatorships and I am all for country by country leadership models. China's "model" is not exportable because it is not a model. China's "model" is "an arrogant mistake in hiding", therefore not one country wants it. If China were a company, you would be the contractor of a business with zero transparency and a lot of suspicious activity. Did you know that the Chinese academia advocated until recently that Chinese people come from a different species as the rest of us? It has clearly been shown to be a false idea, but it is still part of the national curriculum. The leaders are keeping people in the dark so much so that even the Chinese researcher who made the new discovery was surprised. He initially set out to find the distinguished ancestry. It turns out they are just like the rest of us, and that is no surprise to me. Go ahead and embrace the racist, arrogant dictators (holding millions in slavery), who think they are better than you are.
142544
Regina Saphier
Posted about 1 year ago
Eric X. Li: A tale of two political systems
Never mind that my TED video comments are well liked in general (I have been commenting for years, as well as translating and reviewing TED videos for years, as well as writing live TED conference blogs for years) and I am "sorry" that I have a veteran TED blog that even the creator of TED reads and publicly reviews on his own facebook wall (here you can see yourself for example, that Richard wrote the review when he posted my blog link on July 4., not me: https://www.facebook.com/richard.saul.wurman/posts/10151717792967402). What have you done in the TED community beyond random comments? Instead of giving you an outline, I gave you people's publicly available opinions after those people took the time to actually read my essays. Their feedback made me happy. And what "position" are you talking about? My quality work for free? I am doing all of this as an independent, committed, diligent volunteer from home. What I am gaining is the deeper knowledge that I am willing to share. If it is your perception that I managed to earn a "position", how do you think I earned that perception? Are you sure your impulsive reaction was appropriate? Where is your essay regarding this video? How much time have you invested into exploring the deeper layers of this controversial speaker and issue? And of course you do not even have a face... And I am so "sorry" that my happiness makes you so unhappy that you must make negative comments when a community member is giving something meaningful. That says a lot about you. I hope you can do better. :-) And if not, we unfortunately will see another negative reaction from you. Permit me the freedom to share my work with people who are open minded and kind. In no way does it take anything away from you. It is in fact you who is rejecting a positive experience, while turning it into something negative for yourself. Should you not value the feedback from your community in my comment? Should you not listen to those people? Perhaps you should.
142544
Regina Saphier
Posted about 1 year ago
Eric X. Li: A tale of two political systems
Mostly I disagree with Li, but I went from the first impression of "why was a propagandist invited to the TED Global stage at all" to spending a lot of time thinking about the issues that emerged while I wrote my critical essay and comments. So, in a way I ended up with more insight into what I already knew and also managed to learn due to my willingness to think and write about my opinion. Connecting the stories of Hungary, Denmark, the US, China, African nations, and (in part 2) Germany. This is my initial essay: http://mytedblog.wordpress.com/2013/06/18/the-united-states-of-china This is part 2: http://mytedblog.wordpress.com/2013/07/08/the-united-states-of-china-part-2 Here are some of the public reader comments: "HER USUAL PERCEPTIVE HIGH QUALITY HIGH CONTENT COMMENTS. CLARITY PERSONIFIED." (by Richard Saul Wurman, creator of TED) "Very good piece on EXL. ... " (by Glenn Strachan, who knows a lot about Africa & China and attended TED Global 2013) "Your Blog was amazing to read and I was one who shared it with my friends too. ... Your eloquence in describing these changes and how they affect people are poetry. Thank you for sharing your insights and congratulations on [the] +9,012.50% increase [in the number of international views on the blog]!" (by Nat A Lee, who went to Germany from Australia to see the change for herself) :-)
142544
Regina Saphier
Posted about 3 years ago
What have you learnt from watching TEDTalks?
My learning was complex. While watching hundreds of talks from the TED archives, I felt reassured that I have a clue about what is going on in the world, and at the same time I gained a new tool for social change. Earlier I tried to change my country by building an NGO from scratch, but two years ago I realized I could support the change from a different angle and started translating and reviewing TED talks (beyond posting TED talk links to my facebook wall). So, due to this experience I managed to learn new skills: video subtitle translation and review. After a while I got the TED associate status for my TED translations and started watching the TED conferences live online and I had the feeling that I need to take my blogging activity to the next level, and I started live TED conference blogging. Again, a new skill. And it is all voluntary, nobody asked me to do all this. TED for me is a multi layered learning experience: the talks, the interdisciplinary knowledge, the sharing, the changing, the translating, the reviewing, the live blogging...
142544
Regina Saphier
Posted about 3 years ago
Dave deBronkart: Meet e-Patient Dave
Even before I started watching this wonderful TEDx talk, I knew I am going to love it! Here is why: several years ago I was so ill, the only thing I could do was: searching the web for a cure. Doctors kept testing me, finally all of them either gave up, or told me: it is all in my head. I was tired all the time. I went from full time creative and happy, to full time tired. After having read thousands of medical article pages and amazing patient blogs, I finally figured out what happened to me and what I had to do to get better. I changed my diet and lifestyle (I used to work too much), but the key was "vitamin" D! I had to fight for a "vitamin" D test, because it is NOT common medical knowledge (in Hungary, where I live), that "vitamin" D and its receptor influences not only your bones, but also your entire immune system, thyroid function, metabolism, mood, energy level and so on. I had almost no "vitamin" D by the time I got tested! I embraced the sun for D production, I took selenium, I administered safe cod liver oil, I stopped eating gluten and sugar, I stopped drinking milk (to avoid casein), and in a few months I started to feel better. In six weeks my D level was fivefold. Today my "vitamin" D is optimal. According to my endocrinologist, in his practice this is unusual! People are mostly D deficient. Have your 25-D measured and be careful when supplementing with D if you have a chronic disease. My recovery was only possible because I could reach and process all that openly available information out there on the web. In turn I created a "vitamin" D information and self help group on facebook to help others; please, join if you feel you need help and/or if you have information to share: https://www.facebook.com/groups/keepupthegoodD
142544
Regina Saphier
Posted over 3 years ago
We spend 3 billion hours a week as a planet playing videogames. Is it worth it? How could it be MORE worth it?
Jane! Hi! I am not a gamer. I am an online idea generator. When I listened to your talk live last year, I knew that I should translate your talk into Hungarian and I am glad I did that (http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/hun/jane_mcgonigal_gaming_can_make_a_better_world.html). :-) Thank you for the inspiration! I had this idea: Why not create a game that makes people in the developed world responsible for the education of people in the less developed parts of the world. There is now so much content out there for online education for free... I was thinking: Ivy League development, education, etc... students should be inspired by online games ... you know, somehow combining education, mentoring, research and gaming... Get your degree as an online gamer by teaching people skills, showing them the world, interacting with them online and seeing results as we play. Learn from each other. Get your university credits with meaningful online games. I even wrote e-mails about that to the TED management, because TED talks would be perfect for this new way of "online global community graduation" with "gamer organized free educational content" from the web. I imagined getting an experimental PhD in such a way online (on top of my Columbia University MA) from my home in Budapest, Hungary while pulling someone else (living in a less fortunate environment) toward a BA or an MA degree. The game could have an academically meaningful impact beyond the epic win of teaching people skills, languages or science... I am sure many PhD students would be happier with this, instead of being the RA and TA slaves of tenured professors in the US... I could work with a post-doc who is in the US... so that person in the US, me in Hungary, and the person in the Third World: we would get to know each other's needs and culture too and that with minimal carbon footprint. That could promote global power balance and understanding. This in my opinion would be a meaningful game project. :-) Best, Regina Saphier
142544
Regina Saphier
Posted over 3 years ago
Ken Robinson: Changing education paradigms
You are all very welcome. :-) I studied adult learning and explored educational issues at Teachers College Columbia University in New York, USA and a key approach close to my professional world view is multiple intelligences (as described for example by Howard Gardner). I am also a passionate reader of neuro science, sociology and psychology related publications. Plus, I am a daily user of online social networks and virtual communities. I encourage diversity of educational approaches! Some people like TED 18 minutes talks, some like RSA non-animated long talks, some have a brain preference for edited, shortened and animated talks. The key is: people have different brains and different learning styles. For free online learning any of these methods are wonderful in my opinion as long as people manage to grasp the key concepts and become more interested in deeper exploration. Not to mention the value of animation in online language learning (visual aids enhance contextual understanding). I embrace education related innovation, creativity and effort. I am sure Sir Ken Robinson would strongly agree with me. :-)
142544
Regina Saphier
Posted over 3 years ago
Ken Robinson: Changing education paradigms
Changing (Education) Paradigms - This is not a TED talk, it is the shortened (Cognitive Media animated) version of Sir Ken Robinson's Royal Society of Arts (RSA) talk. The original long RSA version is available here: http://www.thersa.org/events/vision/archive/sir-ken-robinson His second RSA talk is about his new book, The Element: http://www.thersa.org/events/vision/archive/sir-ken-robinson-the-element More RSA Animate talks available here: http://comment.rsablogs.org.uk/videos/