About Grant W.

Bio

Grant W. Graves is an award winning director and director of photography. His emphasis in his work has been on all things water; fresh, frozen, and salt. He works in topside environments as well, generally in hard to access or difficult shooting situations. He has a B.S. in marine biology and is a Cambrian Foundation Research Diver with NOAA diving status. Graves has been a bottom diver on the NOAA USS Monitor Project and is one of the only divers to have penetrated the Monitor engine space to document its in situ condition via video prior to its recovery by the US Navy. He is a scuba diving instructor trainer, cave and wreck diving explorer. His efforts in these areas gained him membership into the Explorers Club of New York and Los Angeles Adventurer Club. He is an International Freediving Judge Instructor having judged multiple world records and world championships. He has been awarded as the best international freediving judge in 2008 and 2011. Graves also holds a US Coast Guard Captain License and multiple ratings in emergency and diving medicine.

Languages

English

TED Conference

TEDActive 2014

Areas of Expertise

Videography, Photography, Directing, Scuba Instructor, Expert Witness, Business Development, Non profits, Event organisation/co-ordination, Speaker, Freediving

An idea worth spreading

Redefine failure. So many more to list. Life time learner and forever child eyed wonderluster.

I'm passionate about

Diving in all its forms. I live to explore, educate, research, and preserve all aquatic realms. Professional storytelling, Books, Gourmet Cooking, Wine, My Niece and Nephews.

Talk to me about

Anything and Everything! Mad Generalist in the house.

People don't know I'm good at

I am a good listener. Much more sensitive than most know. Gourmet cook with a intuitive sense for spice.

My TED story

My first encounter with TED were the talks. I love the talks. Then, I realized that there were local events via TEDx and began to go to them. Thank you TEDxSantaMonica, TEDxSoCal, and TEDxManhattanBeach for the powerful introduction to live events. Then, my friend Joichi suggested it would be a good idea to become an organizer, so I did. I love the wide range of topics and the conversations it drives. The community that it builds and the way it allows a safe place for people to think differently and share novel ideas and thoughts is incredible. My involvement has led me to apply for TEDActive and I will be going next year.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

41229
Grant W. Graves
Posted over 1 year ago
Hamish Jolly: A shark-deterrent wetsuit (and it's not what you think)
Huh? Camo is not about the sharks of course it would not work for sharks. It is about the fish being hunted. You will not likely be able to hunt very successfully in white and black stripes. So, I think the blue suit is a way to allow other uses of the suit other than surfing and perhaps still apply some of the potential benefits. My recollection when this idea was studied before that is did not show a great deal of benefits, but perhaps it is evolved from where it was then. I look forward to varied and enough data for reasonable conclusions to be made. Knowledge is never a bad thing. If they can back it up, great. The first time it was viewed as a gimmick more about selling suits than actually doing much. I look forward to seeing what the studies produce.
41229
Grant W. Graves
Posted over 1 year ago
Hamish Jolly: A shark-deterrent wetsuit (and it's not what you think)
Glad to see independent science being done. I look forward to the results. This idea is not new as was mentioned. Experimentation with biomimicary in this context is not new and goes back to the 70s. Shark repellent work has been on and off for a very long time. US Navy has been pursuing the work since before WWII. It is nice to see the priority going to good science independently conducted in context with the effort. Banned sea snakes and other marine life use this pattern to provide visual warnings much as land based critters do the same. The thought is that the visual outweighs any other stimulus or means more in the processing to provide enough guarding behavior to create behavior that was shown, not bite instead of investigating. Since sharks have no hands they tend to investigate by biting. Most human attacks are cases of mistaken identity in ambush or quick strike behaviors, often is poor visibility. So, I would like to see what the behavior is when visibility is reduced greatly or other cues may be strong like with a lure type stimulus. Again, the risk of attack is very low to begin with, so if it helps, great. But, there is way more risk of dying driving in your car to the beach than in the water by many fold. So, much more prudent to concern yourself with how you drive and safety in your vehicle than being in the water. Five times better chance of being struck by lightening. Plenty of other examples to list if you want actual risk probabilities.
41229
Grant W. Graves
Posted over 1 year ago
Hamish Jolly: A shark-deterrent wetsuit (and it's not what you think)
I did not take the blue suit as for surfing. Think spearfishing where the black and white suit is way too obvious when hunting fish. It is a compromise between mitigation from being bitten and not being so obvious that fish see you clearly. Plenty of spearos are camo covered already. Shark attack is a very low risk in context with all the other risks faced by water activities. Everyone is at far greater risk driving to the beach in their cars than they will ever be in the water.
41229
Grant W. Graves
Posted over 1 year ago
Drew Berry: Animations of unseeable biology
That is one of the coolest things ever. Wish I had seen it earlier. Having done molecular work in college as part of my marine biology studies, it is incredible to see represented what has only been in my head for all this time. Yay Drew Berry for bringing this to us.
41229
Grant W. Graves
Posted over 1 year ago
Eddy Cartaya: My glacier cave discoveries
Great message. One of the most powerful tools every person has are their eyes and simply getting up off the couch and bothering to look around. You just do not know until you go. Thank you for bringing that message to kids.
41229
Grant W. Graves
Posted about 2 years ago
Rita Pierson: Every kid needs a champion
Rita, Very powerful and important talk. A message for our time and any time for that matter. Really all of life is about building relationships, what more important place to begin that and establish that importance than in the classroom. Early and often and forever. It is not just important for the teachers, but an important life lesson for the kids for the rest of their lives. Life lessons modeled by those of great importance from a very early age. Champions for kids, yes, but also modeling behaviors that will serve them as adults for their whole lives. Not sure teaching to tests can match that. Great stuff!