About Dave

Bio

David Troy is a serial technology entrepreneur. He started his first business at age 14 in 1986, and has been working in the information technology industry since then. In 1995 he founded ToadNet, a major regional Internet service provider near Baltimore, which he sold to Landmark Communications in 2004. He has been an active contributor to projects such as Asterisk and developed a large-scale distributed call-center technology and VOIP telephony systems for global technology companies. In 2007, David launched two side projects, Twittervision and Flickrvision, which were featured in the 2008 exhibition Design and the Elastic Mind at the Museum of Modern Art. Since then, David has been exploring projects in data visualization with his current company Roundhouse Technologies, which he founded in 2008 with partner Stephen Muirhead. David is also very active in the local technology scene in Baltimore and is a co-founder of Beehive Baltimore, the first coworking space in Baltimore. He is also cofounder of Baltimore Angels, an angel investing group specializing in early-stage information technology startups. In 2009, David also founded TEDxMidAtlantic, a conference dedicated to the power of ideas to change the world. He is 42 and lives in Baltimore, Maryland with his wife and two children. He is a certificated private pilot.

Languages

English, French, German

TED Conferences

TED2016, TEDActive 2015, TEDGlobal 2014, TEDActive 2014, TEDActive 2013, TEDGlobal 2012, TEDActive 2011, TEDGlobal 2010, TEDGlobal 2009

Areas of Expertise

Design, Art, entrepreneurship, Organizing People, Ruby

I'm passionate about

Design, entrepreneurship, self-actualization, effectuation

Talk to me about

Entrepreneurship, Baltimore, Place, Cities, Design

People don't know I'm good at

Cooking, flying, womens fashion

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

155755
Dave Troy
Posted 7 months ago
Dave Troy: Social maps that reveal a city's intersections — and separations
Yes, in longer versions of this talk I make some of those suggestions. For this talk, I was allotted 6 minutes. My ideas are heavily influenced by thinking from Ethan Zuckerman (http://www.ethanzuckerman.com/blog/2008/04/25/homophily-serendipity-xenophilia/), Sandy Pentland (http://socialphysics.media.mit.edu) and others in the field. While I like to think I've contributed some original thinking around investigating cities specifically, all of our work is feeding on the work of others and advancing in step together.
155755
Dave Troy
Posted 7 months ago
Dave Troy: Social maps that reveal a city's intersections — and separations
I don't think there's any one right prescription. People can use this information how they like. Living different places is one action people can take, but so are visiting different neighborhoods, reading different news sources, following different social media accounts. I believe people usually don't fully realize just how isolated they are from other communities.
155755
Dave Troy
Posted 7 months ago
Dave Troy: Social maps that reveal a city's intersections — and separations
My belief is that if most people learn that they are more isolated than they thought they were, they will probably want to change that. There are lots of ways to break out of a filter bubble: read different inputs, spend time in different neighborhoods, attend events you wouldn't normally go to, design events that attract different kinds of people, and be more intentional about interacting with people and points of view we don't always come across. Science suggests that engaging in network exploration is healthy for a society (see the book at http://socialphysics.media.mit.edu). No one can mandate that someone engage in that way, but those that don't will likely be marginalized and disconnected. In this way, network exploration is a selfish thing to do that also benefits society.
155755
Dave Troy
Posted 7 months ago
Dave Troy: Social maps that reveal a city's intersections — and separations
You're right that economic class is a major factor worldwide, but in America that tends to map directly to race. But before we talk about where people live, I think there is a lot of potential in changing who we talk to and where we get our information. When we change our inputs and our points of view, and take a more empathic stance towards people who are not like us, our physical reality will tend to reflect that over time.
155755
Dave Troy
Posted 7 months ago
Dave Troy: Social maps that reveal a city's intersections — and separations
I agree, Bruce. I'm a big Jane Jacobs fan, and "Death and Life" sits by my bedside. :) My opinion is that Jane Jacobs was, in fact, a big data geek: she just used the computer she had handy, namely her extremely facile mind and penchant for empirical observation. I'm excited to be able to expand on her work and potentially move it forward!
155755
Dave Troy
Posted 7 months ago
Dave Troy: Social maps that reveal a city's intersections — and separations
Hi Alex, I've addressed your questions below. 1. We didn't group anyone by race; the groupings are based on how people have organized themselves naturally. We're just providing a legend that indicates what we observed, which is that there is in fact a strong racial organization in Baltimore. It's very strong here (and stronger than in other places) so we pointed it out. It's also my home town, so I know it well. (To your point, we can determine race by looking at profile photos.) 2. Yes, there are some connections, but not enough to bring them closer together. The map indicates that the two ends of the map simply don't have much in common. 3. The map isn't made any differently; the technique is the same. It's simply documenting a phenomenon. No, you couldn't make San Francisco look homophobic using the same data. 4. Twitter use is surprisingly widespread and is inversely proportional to income, so it's not biased in the way you indicate. You can read more about the methodology (and the biases which may exist) here: http://davetroy.com/posts/the-math-behind-peoplemaps I'm happy to address any other questions or concerns you may have about this work.