About Paul

Bio

Paul Stamets is deeply concerned about ecological collapse and extinctions. He is an inventor, researcher, entrepreneur, and has authored six mushroom-related books. Several are used as textbooks around the world by the gourmet and medicinal mushroom industries. He has taught more than 2000 students in advanced tissue culture techniques. His extensive culture library of fungal strains, many of which are isolated from old growth forests, have been tested and provided results that could be game-changers for helping human and habitat health. He is the founder of Fungi Perfecti, LLC (www.fungi.com, www.fungi.net, www.hostdefense.com)

He has been awarded 8 patents with more pending. Paul has received several environmental awards. In 2008, Utne Reader recognized Paul as one of the 50 Visionaries of the Year. In 2010, he received the President's Award from the NW Society of Ecological Restoration. He was also recognized by National Geographic as s 'Green-o-vator'. In June of 2013, Paul received an honorary, accredited Doctorate of Science degree from National College for Naturopathic Medicine. In January of 2014, he received the North American Mycological Association (www.namyco.org) lifetime achievement award for his contributions to amateur and professional mycology.

Paul is an advisor to the Program of Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona Medical School, Tucson; on the Editorial Board of The International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms. Many physicians recommend his products for enhancing immune defense. Stamets is the supplier and co-investigator of the first two NIH funded clinical studies using medicinal mushrooms in the United States and in 2010, a NIH funded clinical trial showed positive results of his medicinal mushrooms used as adjunct therapies helping immune recovery in breast cancer patients. He is currently collaborating with NIH/Virology and the CDC mycotics disease divisions.

He holds 7 patents on using mycelium to control insects, and most recent patent (Aug 2013) issued, all of which have the potential of replacing most chemical pesticides with a nature-morphed solution that not only can protect crops and buildings but also limit disease vectors carried by insects. Working with gov't laboratories, he has identified a new group of powerful antiviral compounds, particularly from the old growth mushroom Agarikon which he believes holds a reservoir of medically significant compounds. HIs latest patent (March 2014) focuses Agarikon mycelium extracts and components active against avian, herpes viruses and pathogenic bacteria: staph, E. coli, and TB. Working with the Institute for Tuberculosis Research at the University of Chicago, Paul and colleagues have discovered a group of anti TB coumarins. His newest patent application utilizes mycelium to help bees overcome Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD).

Paul's fungal strain collection is extensive and unique, with many of the strains coming from old growth forests,

Married to Dusty Yao, whose shares a passion for fungi, and love of the old growth forests.

His latest book, Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms Can Help Save the World, describes the use of mycelium for planetary healing. His other books include The Mushroom Cultivator, Growing Gourmet & Medicinal Mushrooms, Psilocybin Mushrooms of the World (Paul's work on this subject was covered by a DEA license) & MycoMedicinals. His new book, a work in progress, is The Medicinal Mushroom Guide, due out in late 2014.

Paul invented "The Life Box" (www.lifeboxcompany.com), is a clever and simple solution to empower individuals to help offset climate change and re-green the planet. The LIfe Box has hundreds of tree seeds and mycorrhizal spores infused into the corrugations of the box which sprouts a tree nursery upon activation. Paul has received numerous awards and honors for his contributions to the science of medicinal mushrooms and ecology. His TED (2008) talk "How Mushrooms Can Help Save the World has been rated in the top 10 of all TED talks, and viewed more than 2,400,000 times. His TEDMED (2011) introduced medicinal mushrooms to more than 800 physicians. Both TED and TEDMED talks have received 99% positive reviews on youtube and as rated by Quora as the one of the best TED talks to date based on youtube.com votes.

His current research is using medicinal mushrooms to augment conventional therapies by immunopotentiation, activating innate regeneration of nerves, exploring for new antivirals. Several mycoremediation projects are on going. Research into protecting bees is planned for 2014. A central premise of his work is that habitats and humans share immune systems and mycelium is the cellular bridge connecting us. Paul believes time is short. Now is an 'all hands on deck' moment to respond to the ecological collapses occurring before us now.

TED Conferences

TED2015, TED2014, TED2013, TED2012, TED2011, TED2010, TED2008

Areas of Expertise

mycology, mycofiltration, mycoremediation, tissue culturing

An idea worth spreading

Fungal networks, mycelium, has inherent properties useful for addressing issues of water cleansing, bioremediation, habitat resilience, disease mitigation, and strengthening foodwebs. After hundreds of millions of years of evolution, the kingdom of fungi represent a largely untapped resource rich in solutions of paramount importance today.

Habitats have immune systems that are fortified by mycelial networks setting the stage for supporting microbial communities and the bidirectional flows of nutrients to the benefit of the plurality of species in ecosystems. Mycelium is the foundation of the food web, our genetic ancestors, and learning of their evolutionary roles can help navigate towards a healthier future.

Mycelium can cover thousands of acres, and is primarily composed of carbon rich sugars which can be converted into alcohols such as Myconol. Moreover, mycelium sequesters carbon dioxide through production of glomalins & oxalates, making soils, reversing global warming

I'm passionate about

Saving the Earth by re-investing in fungal networks, that build soil banks, supporting food webs, and preserving biodiversity. I believe mycelial membranes can prevent diseases and viral pandemics.

Talk to me about

How to prevent global pandemics and prevent extinctions. What can be done across the globe in using mycorestoration technlogies/teacher training centers based upon my book Mycelium Running

People don't know I'm good at

Using fungal networks for solutions to reverse global warming, renewing soil, filtering water, breaking down toxins, mitigating diseases spreading from habitats to human, ehnancing immunity.

My TED story

Mycelium ! Many of the solutions that challenge us today have solutions which are literally underfoot - the vast network of fungal cells, Mycelium, that are only one cell wall thick and yet one fungal organism can cover thousands of acres, achieving the largest mass and size of any lifeform on Earth. These fungal networks are in constant biomolecular communication with the ecosystem, and develop host defense strategies against the billions of microbes that in constant contact with mycelium. That these mycelial networks survive is a testimonial to innate ability to intelligently respond to catastrophia. We can learn from the innate intelligence of these networks, and in doing so, tap into what I believe is a form of natural intelligence. We need to listen to nature, and these mycelial networks have much to teach us - as they are- our ancestors. We share a common ancestry with fungi than we do with any other organism. See Mycelium Running, How Mushrooms Can Help Save the World.

Comments & conversations

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Paul Stamets
Posted 8 months ago
Paul Stamets: 6 ways mushrooms can save the world
For more information, please see my TEDMED 2011 talk: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pXHDoROh2hA Our business website is www.fungi.com I have 37 videos posted at www.youtube.com/paulstamets See my "Linked In" page for a two page summary of inventions that could help protect the planet. My Facebook page is regularly updated (www.facebook.com/paulstamets) with my lecture schedule and other interesting fungal news. We are all on this Earthship together. We need to help each other. Respectfully, Paul Stamets
59531
Paul Stamets
Posted almost 2 years ago
Paul Stamets: 6 ways mushrooms can save the world
Folks For a further update on my research, see my TEDMED 2011 talk: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mjv8Zj1ABAc I am writing monthly columns on the medicinal and ecological aspects of mushrooms and other fungi for the Huffington Post. If interested in staying informed, go to: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-stamets/ Respectfully, Paul Stamets www.fungi.com
59531
Paul Stamets
Posted over 2 years ago
Paul Stamets: 6 ways mushrooms can save the world
To the mycologically curious: My 10 minute TEDMED (October 2011) talk is up. See: http://www.tedmed.com/videos-info?name=Paul_Stamets_at_TEDMED_2011&q=updated&year=all and be sure to also see for the Q & A http://www.tedmed.com/videos-info?name=Paul_Stamets_at_TEDMED_2011_-_Q_and_A&q=updated&year=all thanks for your support on this mycelial path. please pass on. cheers ! Paul (www.fungi.com)
59531
Paul Stamets
Posted almost 3 years ago
Paul Stamets: 6 ways mushrooms can save the world
Anatoll Thanks for your inquiry. The Guiding Principles for this IP are attached to my patents and are listed in Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms Can Help Save the World. Entomopathogenic fungi exist wherever ants and termites live. One of the many advantages of my inventions here is that we can take a native strain from any termite graveyard, for instance, and morph this native strain to be an attractant. Once a nest is treated, the spores form and repel future invasions. Hence, we can have a localized zone of control. Again, these fungi are everywhere where insects exist and indeed, are probably under every footstep you take on soils where insects reside. The treatment and effect is proximate. thanks ! Respectfully, Paul Stamets (www.fungi.com)
59531
Paul Stamets
Posted over 3 years ago
Paul Stamets: 6 ways mushrooms can save the world
Mike Thanks for your comments. Here is what I said "Dusty and I, we like to say, on Sunday this is where we go to church. I'm in love with the old-growth forest, and I'm a patriotic American because we have those." I have found evidence that our U.S. old growth forests could help our national defense. Nothing left-leaning about this. No mention of Republicans. President Teddy Roosevelt probably felt the same.about the old growth forest as I do. He was a Republican. My patents are one place to explore the novelty of my ideas. (See www.uspto.gov) Patentability is given to novelty, not to what others think. If you go to my websites www.fungi.com, www.facebook.com/paulstamets or www.youtube.com/paulstamets , more information can be found on my work, as well as delving into any of my 6 books, including in particular Growing Gourmet & Medicinal Mushrooms and Mycelium Running, both of which are highly respected and reviewed. Much more is soon to come. Thanks for your interest. Respectfully Paul Stamets
59531
Paul Stamets
Posted over 3 years ago
Paul Stamets: 6 ways mushrooms can save the world
Fellow TEDster Earthling Teammates The tragedy in Japan has brought into focus, for me, what we could do to help heal the ecosystem. I suggest a novel mycoremediation strategy: The Nuclear Forest Recovery Zone. This approach would be to utilize the abundant wood debris, chipping it, and placing the chipped wood over the most contaminated landscapes. Thereupon, trees with mycorrhizal mushrooms, native to Japan, would uptake and hyperaccumulate radioactive metals, a phenomenon brought into focus after Chernobyl where one mushroom, Gomphidius glutinosus, concentrated 10,000 x the background, ambient levels of cesium 137. Here is the url that has a PDF which describes, with references, this approach: http://coalitionforpositivechange.com/stamets-fallout-mycoremediation.pdf or you can go to my facebook page for updates: www.facebook.com/paulstamets We all must try to help the Earth recover from this global tragedy. Respectfully, Paul Stamets
59531
Paul Stamets
Posted about 4 years ago
Paul Stamets: 6 ways mushrooms can save the world
Zach, Felipe and others. Truly grateful. Since this TED talk, much has happened. I am increasingly confident that fungal solutions can help solve famine, disease, improve environments and reduce the threat of terrorism. I have come to realize that habitats have immune systems (just like us !) and mushrooms are a mending bridge supporting biodiversity and sustainability. For those who wish to stay in the loop, check out my www.youtube.com/paulstamets for a series of short vids on our work. This is a team effort - I/we need all the support that we can muster. Truly, the Earth is in crisis and it is time for all hands on deck. The power of mycelium, its inherent network design, affords us many opportunities for helping restore the planet. I still face enormous opposition - mycophobia - and naturally many fear that which is so powerful yet poorly understood. We all can make a difference. My latest book, Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms Can Help Save the World, helps pierce the envelope.
59531
Paul Stamets
Posted about 4 years ago
Paul Stamets: 6 ways mushrooms can save the world
Ozhan - Comments like yours inspire me on this path. Thank you. We are on this Earthship together. Some of us are working like heck to do something while others are contrarians trying to justify why we/they can not move forward. The body intellect of nature is vast and something to which we need to pay attention. Mycelium has opened up my eyes, and yet....this is a constant uphill struggle. Your thoughts help me move forward on this path. Thank you. Paul Stamets
59531
Paul Stamets
Posted over 4 years ago
Paul Stamets: 6 ways mushrooms can save the world
I have an on-going update on the usefulness of mycoremediation in addressing the BP oil spill on our website at: http://fungi.com/mycotech/petroleum_problem.html with a section entitled 'What we know' and 'What we do not know'. We are soon updating this section with our 'mycobooms' -oyster mycelium on straw. (See my TED talk for a description of our research in breaking down oil using oyster mushroom mycelium.) The advantage of these mycobooms is that they float, they release oil-eating enzymes over time, the straw and the mycelium absorbs oil, and they are fully biodegradable. These could be generated using storm debris, straw, etc...and produced by the mile, to be placed inside of containment booms, to help mitigate the oil spills within the marshes. The myceiiated straw sets the platform for oil-eating bacteria. This synergistic system, I hypothesize, may be an important tool in our tool-set of solutions. Stay tuned to www.fungi.com for more info. Thank you. Paul Stamets
59531
Paul Stamets
Posted over 4 years ago
Paul Stamets: 6 ways mushrooms can save the world
Life Boxes are available for purchase this week via on-line at www.fungi.com for less than 100 boxes. Check out our home page at www.lifeboxcompany.com for more information, including frequently asked questions, etc. Cheers ! Paul Stamets