Dustin Huibregtse

Technology Consultant, Deloitte Consulting
Minneapolis, MN, United States

About Dustin

Bio

I am currently a technology consultant with Deloitte Consulting. I work with healthcare provider technology and assist with consolidated software installations as well as consult on heathcare business models. Within my firm I am passionate for philanthropy, non profit and small business, data visualization, and big data. I currently direct TEDxHennepinAve in Minneapolis.

I am an alumni of the University of Minnesota studying MIS (business technology) and Entrepreneurship with the Carlson School of Management. I was the proud organizer of TEDxUMN with a great team of undergraduate students. There I celebrated my passion for business, startups, and technology.

I was a student organizer for over eight years, organizing such things as film festivals, parades, a University wide block party, a volunteer tax program, and TEDxUMN. Organizing these initiatives while in school had given me the chance to explore my passion for startups and entrepreneurship, and learn a fair amount about business, relationships, leadership, and people. I helped a few of my close friends start their own companies, and enjoy advising other businesses and non profits.

I have traveled to Hong Kong and other parts of Asia for a four month study abroad trip. I enjoy hearing about other peoples' travels and their adventures globe trotting.

I have explored my passion for business through a range of internships in the medical device industry, healthcare, technology auditing, consulting, education, and industrial design. I truly enjoy hearing about startup pitches and business model innovation. I look forward to conceptualizing and ideating around ideas worth spreading and their business viewpoints.

Overall, I love the TEDx initiative, and am thankful for the opportunity to meet people from such a range of backgrounds, and seeing how they all connect.

Languages

English

TED Conferences

TEDActive 2015, TEDActive 2013, TEDActive 2012

Areas of Expertise

Business, Design, Speaker, Presenter, Researcher, Inspiration, Analyst, Data Visualizer, business models, Technology - Business Strategy and Effect

An idea worth spreading

Require all colleges to enroll their students in a for credit independent study program that allows them to do their own private projects or to allow them to participate in a system where cross collaborative teams form and work together to invent, innovate, build companies, and actively apply their learning and develop by discovery.

A world without screens, forming a unity between digital content and free space whereby we are freed from LCD.

A huge fund dedicated to funding research of the crazy and wacky in hopes to generate actual research that drives whole new discovery that is completely disruptive and blows incremental innovation out of the water. I want to see new planets!

I'm passionate about

Inspiring others to go out and create something, then giving them the tools, network, and advice to help them succeed. Building communities, and designing great experiences.

Talk to me about

Technology, Education, Startups, Tech Incubators, Product Development, Healthcare Tech, Web, Gen Y, Hookah, TV Shows, Future of Reading, Data

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

255810
Dustin Huibregtse
Posted over 4 years ago
We spend 3 billion hours a week as a planet playing videogames. Is it worth it? How could it be MORE worth it?
Interesting perspective Anna. The biggest reason I don't play games either is simply because my time is so constrained, and every time I play I feel I am not making progress towards completing something of value. However, I still respect gamers a good amount: their community, their leadership, their enthusiasm, and the joy they find in the game. Don't get me wrong, some games are simply for leisure and some require massive amounts of vulgar language online, but others hold strong value in their quality of writing, storytelling, and "relaxing" value they bring to the gamer. That was one of the few reasons I played games a while back: for the quality of the story and the complexity of characters.
255810
Dustin Huibregtse
Posted over 4 years ago
We spend 3 billion hours a week as a planet playing videogames. Is it worth it? How could it be MORE worth it?
Adam, I liked what you had to say on this topic. Personally, I have had friends that played video games all through high school (WoW), and they developed their own language for speaking with each other. Two games I would really like to highlight are World of Warcraft and EVE Online. Both of these games are MMORPGs that require a massive amount of team coordination, teamwork, leadership development, and organizational management. To run a "guild" for instance requires that you have some understanding of business, leadership, time management, and many other skill sets. My best friend is a huge video gamer, and when his parents thought he wasn't going to go anywhere int he world he ended up becoming top of his class in the computer science department at his college. He is doing very well, and loves what he studies. Further, when I heard my little cousin was getting into computers, I urged his parents to help subsidize him with more technology, software, and books. Get him into computer science, game design and development, web design and development, and coding in general. I told them that he will learn incredibly useful skills and be heavily recruited not only by a college but also by a company out of school. Furthermore, the best video games are the ones that often tell a great story: a beginning, middle, and end. Complex plots, excellent character development, and imaginative. I say if my kid (if I had a kid) isn't reading, doing homework, or outside with his, let him play a video game because he is not only being enriched (if you get the right game, that is), but also is using his imagination, problem solving skills, and having fun while doing it. Further, if it is an MMORPG, he is making friends and socializing with people online--not only listening and being a part of some bigger organization, but maybe even leading. I recommend reading this great article: http://personalmba.com/everything-i-know-about-business-i-learned-from-world-of-warcraft/
255810
Dustin Huibregtse
Posted over 4 years ago
We need a political party devoted to maximizing the value of people's TIME.
This is great! Maybe we can look at implementing a movement focused on our current government parties and ask them simply to do just that: hire staff and faculty (or consultants) geared towards the design aspect of processes. The book "Change by Design" by Tim Brown, CEO of IDEO (fascinating guy) outlines some principles about the focus on designing better "experiences" (in a very creative way). We could ask him to donate some of his books and send them to key decision makers at the government centers, with a letter stating, "The Citizens of [Fill in country here] demand that you design our government departments, urban planning, taxation systems, health system, and the beuracracy with us in mind. Simply make us love working with government". I saw a great TED video by Thomas Goetz from TEDMED. He outlines what Wired did for some complex medical documents: http://www.ted.com/talks/thomas_goetz_it_s_time_to_redesign_medical_data.html. I loved it, I think he is one of the reasons I am starting to look at taking up a hobby of making infographics. A simple grassroots approach asking for our governments to design their beuracracy...that may be a good place to start.
255810
Dustin Huibregtse
Posted over 4 years ago
Charles Limb: Your brain on improv
I am a bit curious yet cautious about the proposition to take creativity into the realm of scientific discussion. It would be a wonderful research study as to how the brain functions during creativity and improv, but I am curious about how they intend to apply it to practice. Bringing certain types of creativity in music and mapping it onto the known regions of the brain could yield a discussion around how certain types of creativity "align with" known interactions of the brain, and then shed more light into how the brain works. This is a study, and scientific research, which I believe should be pursued. However, I would urge us all to make sure creativity stays natural and uninhibited.
255810
Dustin Huibregtse
Posted over 4 years ago
Sugata Mitra: The child-driven education
My takeaway from his talk is the discussion around discovery based learning. C. K. Prahalad, the author of The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, discusses what many of the countries and regions Mr. Mitra discusses needs to succeed. Technology was on the top of the list, and Mitra shows a way to integrate technology and internet connection into these regions of the world. He has created a model that is starting to show actual numbers and quantitative success. The "Grannycloud" is awesome...and shows you what can be done with this same technology. If it isn't grandmothers, then it could be Teach for America volunteers or nonprofit organizations with volunteering moderators. Besides this, the 4:1 to students to computers is not only innovative from a discovery-by-peering process, but also because the infrastructure will cost less and works with the discussion around moderators or grannies to student ratios. The internet provides a great collection of information for the hungry.
255810
Dustin Huibregtse
Posted over 4 years ago
Brené Brown: The power of vulnerability
Nafissa, thanks for this comment. Vulnerability is something that requires the greatest trust between people. Unfortunately a lot of people take that vulnerability and don't use it positively. I do like your comment in that it highlights how you must make yourself vulnerable before you can truly build a relationship with a best friend or love someone. Thanks for that
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Dustin Huibregtse
Posted over 4 years ago
Beverly + Dereck Joubert: Life lessons from big cats
I studied Biology way back my freshmen year of college. My professor studied lions in Tanzania. This talk is spot on with the research he was doing. He highlighted in great detail not only the poaching, but far more the disease and weakening of the lion over time. What they have highlighted here is upcoming extinction. Some of you do go after the discussion of poaching as a major problem, and one that is economic. If there is profit and demand, it will continue to exist indefinitely. On the other end we discuss disease control of the animals, and on the other we have the slow destruction of other species in this habitat due to the food chain becoming distorted. I think this discussion is a fascinating one to have with the diverse community at TED: sociologists, economists, biologists, conservationists, political leadership, and business leaders. Complex problems can be solved by this type of community.