Francisco F Moreno

Daly City, CA, United States

About Francisco F

Languages

English

An idea worth spreading

Ideas that promote peace, prosperity, and sustainable living

I'm passionate about

Art, Architecture, Environment, Human Behavior, and Sustainable Living

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

217301
Francisco F Moreno
Posted 4 months ago
Jackie Savitz: Save the oceans, feed the world!
"We know that saving the oceans can feed the world!" Jackie Savitz. Easier said than done. Everyday we humans collectively add tons and tons of toxic materials and poisonous substances into our rivers, lakes, and oceans. The more technologically advanced and materially wealthy a country is, the more garbage it dumps. It makes all the other living things on earth cry. It's a shame. It's also really, really sad. Human nature, the biggest threat to us humans.
217301
Francisco F Moreno
Posted 4 months ago
What do you think is the biggest issue in Asia and how to deal with it?
Keen observers of the what is going on in Asia, especially in East Asia, are acutely concerned about the possibilities of conflicts that could erupt as a result of the territorial disputes between China and its neighbors. "Six countries lay overlapping claims to the East and South China Seas, an area that is rich in hydrocarbons and natural gas and through which trillions of dollars of global trade flow. As it seeks to expand its maritime presence, China has been met by growing assertiveness from regional claimants like Japan, Vietnam, and the Philippines. The increasingly frequent standoffs span from the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands, on China’s eastern flank, to the long stretch of archipelagos in the South China Sea that comprise hundreds of islets. The U.S. pivot to Asia, involving renewed diplomatic activity and military redeployment, could signal Washington’s heightened role in the disputes, which, if not managed wisely, could turn part of Asia’s maritime regions from thriving trade channels into arenas of conflict..." "Thousands of vessels ply the East and South China Sea waters, from fishing boats to coastal patrols and naval ships. Increasingly frequent clashes between China and its neighbors heighten the risk that miscalculations by sea captains or political leaders could trigger an armed conflict, which the United States could be drawn into through military commitments to allies Japan and the Philippines. Policy experts believe that a crisis management system for the region is crucial..." http://www.cfr.org/asia-and-pacific/chinas-maritime-disputes/p31345#!/
217301
Francisco F Moreno
Posted 5 months ago
How could Japan accept migration.
Japan wants to preserve its way of life and doesn't want to experience cultural and economic strangulation. "Strangler fig is the common name for a number of tropical and subtropical plant species, including some banyans and unrelated vines... They all share a common "strangling" growth habit that is found in many tropical forest species, particularly of the genus Ficus. This growth habit is an adaptation for growing in dark forests where the competition for light is intense. These plants begin life as epiphytes, when their seeds, often bird-dispersed, germinate in crevices atop other trees. These seedlings grow their roots downward and envelop the host tree while also growing upward to reach into the sunlight zone above the canopy." An original support tree can sometimes die, so that the strangler fig becomes a "columnar tree" with a hollow central core." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strangler_fig
217301
Francisco F Moreno
Posted 5 months ago
I am looking for ideas from fellow tax payers on how we can fix the problem with funding public education.
"I have often asked my administration if I can charge for a babysitting service when a kid sits in my room and refuses do any work?" Ms. Smith: Let us take a typical fifth grade math class of twenty-five students: a) 2 students are at grade level, mastered basic arithmetic skills including long division (3-digit divisors) b) 5 students are at one year below grade level, struggling in 2 and 3 digit multiplication and division c) 13 students are at two-years below grade level, haven't mastered multiplication tables and 3 and 4-digit subtraction d) 5 students are at three or four years below grade level, counting with fingers even when doing basic addition and subtraction such as 8 + 6 or 15 - 7 Questions: 1) Assuming the lesson you prepared is on fractions/decimals/per cents: Will you give the same lesson or classwork or homework or test to every student? 2) Why is there such a wide knowledge and performance gap among the students? Who is responsible for this problem? This kind of situation is happening all over the school system for years. This is one of the reasons why some kids "refuse" to do any work. Everybody is paying lip-service and most of the time, teachers and administrators blame students and their parents. Assuming you were approached by the Secretary of Education to propose solutions to the knowledge and performance gap among students, what would be your proposals?
217301
Francisco F Moreno
Posted 5 months ago
Is the Common Core negating the purpose of UDL?
The short answer is YES. However, I have attended seminars and meetings on Common Core State Standards and based on the determination of many educators, it will be a challenge for many teachers and administrators to implement Common Core requirements and it will even be more challenging for the majority of students to meet the Common Core standards. Will new Common Core standards succeed in centralizing student learning?: "JOHN MERROW: Yes, if I could weigh in, that a fundamental distinction between the United States and most other countries is, we — we test teachers. Now, the kids take the tests, but we’re testing teachers. Most countries are assessing kids to figure it out. I was looking at a PISA sample test and an Oregon high school math test. The high school math question was, a certain valley has six snakes. They double in number every year. In how many years will there be 96 snakes? Well, that’s just counting on your fingers. A PISA test, by a comparison, says, a hike up to the top of Mount Fuji is 18 kilometers. You can — a boy can — a man can go 1.5 kilometers an hour on the way up, three kilometers an hour on the way down. The down — the park closes at 8:00. At what hour in the morning does he have to leave to be back before the park closes? Now, it’s not multiple choice. There’s a whole lot of mathematics. The Oregon test was a multiple-guess question. We simply don’t ask enough of our kids. That’s a huge part of the problem…" http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/education-july-dec13-education_12-24/