Philip Sanderson

Student, Philosophy, University of Essex, UK

About Philip

Bio

Definitional Diversity is the source of 80% of arguments. In the other 20% we will find all of what it is to be human.

Languages

English

I'm passionate about

Philosophy

Comments & conversations

105884
Philip Sanderson
Posted over 4 years ago
Paul Root Wolpe: It's time to question bio-engineering
I think we are hear to not necessary move the bar, but to redefine our criteria for determining where the bar should be. May I direct you to this video first: [ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6479QAJuz8 ] for dogs ability to understand language which is half the step. If we could give a dog a voice box, one equal to or even better than a human. Maybe the dog would learn to talk, maybe we need to change its brain a little, or a lot. If it learnt to talk, would this justify its suffering is wrong? Would it be cruel to make a dog more sapient by tampering with its brain because it would only have the rights of a dog? While ur at it, teach the dog to sing beautifully. Maybe then it will have its worth by being able to express its self through song? Would the words sapient and sentient be of any use any more?
105884
Philip Sanderson
Posted over 4 years ago
Paul Root Wolpe: It's time to question bio-engineering
I would think that in 100 years we could have something similar. I do not wish to legislate, I wish to discus. Personally, would you genetically enhance your children to have high brain capacities than normally possible? Or a higher tollorance to cancer? Or maybe to be slightly taller?
105884
Philip Sanderson
Posted over 4 years ago
What is love?
Love is a word. Possibly the most misinterpreted word that has ever existed. When you read the word love, it is but 4 letters: L; O; V; & E. And yet it conjures such strong emotions in some, while relating to nothing in others. It causes pain and it causes sorrow; yet only by brining joy and wonder. Love is the essence of what communication is in humans, it expresses our inability to communicate adequately. When you ask that question, you must understand that you are not going to get a definitive answer. For every person that lives, you will find that they have a justified say in what love is. Love cannot be defined; It can be explained, but not defined[1]. Love will be that one feeling, that only you have. There are so many different kinds of love. Platonic, Agape and Erotic are 3 ways in which you could try and model love. Yet there is also True Love, and there is Love of Music. Ask instead: What kind of love do you feel? [1]Explaining love: http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/helen_fisher_studies_the_brain_in_love.html
105884
Philip Sanderson
Posted over 4 years ago
How the memory works.
I like it! What we need is a someone with knowledge in neurology to come and fill in the blanks for you. Im sure TED will provide. I like to compare this to Plato's theory of forms. I think this more or less explains what a 'Form' is. The idea that we have had many 'mental images' of different cats in our time and that a form would be us exploring these different ideas and finding the aspects that are continuous throughout. Then we create what is almost an artificial 'mental image' that we can then apply in a general way, so we no longer need to keep details when defining what a cat is. For example: Cat A: Long tail Cat B: Short tail Cat C: Brown tail Cats: Tails The difference is that a form comes from experience rather than being innate/coming from reason
105884
Philip Sanderson
Posted over 4 years ago
How the memory works.
I dont rembmer where i saw this so i cant reference sorry, but our brain only prosses about 10% of what we see. Meaning that just becasue we can see a cat, does not meen we acknowlage it as a cat, maybe just as, 'obstacle' or not at all.
105884
Philip Sanderson
Posted over 4 years ago
Paul Root Wolpe: It's time to question bio-engineering
Morality is not the issue directly under threat here. Whats under threat is our contemporary definitions of what it is to be human, a member of a species or even an individual. These are the foundations of morality, and this technology blurs the lines. The loss of identity is what scares me. Would your gender become meaningless when your brain is the only part of you that exists? The film "Bicentennial Man (1999)" [ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0182789/ ] sheds light on the question of what it is to be human. If you are interested in the topic I suggest watching. Personally, when my body has withered to near death, I would like to have my brain implanted into something like this suit: [ http://www.dump.com/2011/03/08/incredible-exoskeleton-suit-video/ ] only more mechanically operated. Would I still be human? Would I still have the same rights? If war broke out, would the 'Mechanically abled' be forced to take the front line?