Scott Woodbury

Mechanical Design Engineer, Thermo Fisher Scientific
Epping, NH, United States

About Scott

Languages

English

Areas of Expertise

Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering and Innovation, Interactive Entertainment (Computer and video game), Community & Social Development

I'm passionate about

Technology, Exploration, Games, Design, Community

Comments & conversations

Noface
Scott Woodbury
Posted 8 months ago
Community Organization and Impact in Online Games
Another example is the Survival game DayZ which is both a PVP and PVE game type "Player verses Player and Player vs Environment" It's not a round based game with time limits like other shooters, you start with a character with only the basic cloths, no weapons or other supplies except a flashlight.The AI antagonists are zombies which predominantly occupy areas around towns and buildings where needed supplies are located. In addition there is an element of degradation for your character and your supplies. You have hunger, thirst, your cloths and weapons accumulate ware, damage and you can suffer from injuries. The end result is your death. Many players when well equipped and healthy will turn on other survivors for sport, These players in the game are known as "bandits". Friends will form a group to pray on newly spawned players, or will single out individuals. There are handcuffs and rope in the game to capture players and there is rotten food and disinfectant with the mechanic to force feed a captured player. This activity can create the element of distrust of a met player on a server and some will KOS or "Kill on Sight" any player they meet. These stressors as part the game mechanic create the drama and reward for using your wits and skill. The reward is duration, the value is in your ability with the sparse equipment you can find or take from another. The end result is most everyone will eventually die and need to respawn to begin the process all over.
Noface
Scott Woodbury
Posted 8 months ago
Community Organization and Impact in Online Games
I've been involved in trying to direct or "steer" a community in a collaborative and positive direction that benefits the objective play mechanics in some of these games. The truth is it can only work where people share similar values and seek to gain a similar experience from the activity. The surprising part is there are those that share the same value for exploitation and what others consider "bad sport behaviour" One example is the dedicated space on the SOCOM server Playstation set aside for the eSeals. This was a competitive initiative with structured events and tournament ladders. We had our own forums and Admins. The problem is the Admins had no control over the dedicated server space. These lobbies quickly became the home of exploiters and cheaters for the soul purpose of sharing, learning and practicing the exploits, glitches and cheats. These were commonly known as GNK rooms or "Glitch No Kill" which is an understood agreement to only share cheats and glitches and to not kill others on the opposing team. It was a collaborative effort to undermine the "rules" of the game to gain advantages over others. This became the shared objective and provided the entertainment for those involved.
Noface
Scott Woodbury
Posted 8 months ago
Community Organization and Impact in Online Games
Justin you brought up some excellent points and observation as well as Danial's accounts on the "mask" of identity which provides "raw" emotional input from individuals. Some of the abusive or exploitative behavior can be attributed to younger less mature players but not all. Given the fact that the average age of a gamer is around 30 last I checked statistically the average abusive individual would also not deviate very far from this demographic. http://www.theesa.com/facts/gameplayer.asp http://www.theesa.com/facts/pdfs/esa_ef_2013.pdf The aspect of anonymity for online interactions was desired by many for privacy. It's this anonymity in the community that also allows for many to behave abusively and destructively. As a former moderator for the Playstation forums I witnessed on a daily basis the abusive behavior of adult seemingly normal people. It's not unreasonable to surmise that many of these people have well paying jobs, live in a home, and interact more acceptably in social society because they have the means to buy the systems and games as well as pay for broadband internet. Sony and Playstation has been actively trying to deal with this abuse and one aspect they are working with on the Playstation 4 is the option to share your real name and by connecting your account to other social accounts like facebook. Part of this is to incentivate people to be less abusive and more socially responsible by removing the "mask".
Noface
Scott Woodbury
Posted 8 months ago
Community Organization and Impact in Online Games
My experience is it's people's inability to deal with their own personal frustrations and they are acting out in a disruptive way to get attention. In parallel to your examples it would be the 5 year old child who isn't winning the game so they knock the game pieces off the board. It comes back to human nature, when someone does not get the positive attention they seek they will seek out negative attention to cause an effect in order to have some form of impact on the situation. Some of these games are based on competitive play and the value people place on "winning" or being thought of as a "winner" can play on peoples egos. Some things people will do is play music or make lots of noises over the mic, people will whistle or talk insolently about nonsense or be outright vulgar and insulting to others. Other forms involve the game play itself by killing or interfering with members of your own team, failing objectives intentional, and other disruptive activities.
Noface
Scott Woodbury
Posted 8 months ago
Community Organization and Impact in Online Games
I don't really like to put labels like this but there is often the terms casual and hardcore gamers. There are a vast majority of gamers who don't interact very much beyond the game space. They don't go on forums or become involved with the community. They play the games and the experience ends there. There are some like myself who by nature become more involved in the experience and gaming is more of a hobby than an activity. With some of my friends it's a means of an income and a career providing content for the gaming industry or as part of the entertainment surrounding the gaming industry. I participate in many of these community spaces about the games and the gaming industry. I'm directly involved and an active member in relation to my hobby. Popular games based on collaborative play will have many organised groups who actively meet, plan and train to be more competitive. Some are more extended social spaces to share experiences. What ever level you want to be involved with there is a place for you to do so. The impact you have on the space you participate in can affect how others perceive you. Some people are natural leaders other are support, some can be disruptions. It's as diverse as people are by nature. Some communitys are very organised and have some form of ranks and a structure. These are built by the people who value the need for this in relation to the members and activity.
Noface
Scott Woodbury
Posted 8 months ago
Community Organization and Impact in Online Games
The activity you were speaking on is called larping, it stands for live action roll playing. There has always been some personal interaction associated with gaming. The first way to play some of these games together was through a LAN or local area network connection where the game platforms were wired together on a network hub. LAN parties are still popular and people still participate in them. The gaps in personal connections began when online play and the internet became wide spread and more people became involved. People still seek out these personal connections outside of the gaming experience. Many adult gamers who have the means to travel to gatherings often do to meet friends in real life. E3 in LA and PAX are massive examples of how people will gather and there are smaller organizations solely focused on one game type like Quake-con. I have meet many of the people I know from the online space. These casual experiences can transition into meaningful relationships with others.
Noface
Scott Woodbury
Posted 8 months ago
Community Organization and Impact in Online Games
By chatter I mean when the social unrelated communication becomes more pervasive than the focused collaborative game play communication. Many team based co-operative or competitive games have an "open mic" or text box so you can communicate with your team co-op players and some allow communication with the opposing team in some form but those are more limited. Some social banter is encouraged. When it becomes intrusive to the objectives of the game its disruptive and causes frustration and discourse for a group. Engagement, entertainment and enrichment are part of the experience but the goals and objectives are the reason for playing. People will and do use other communication methods in an exploitative way. Some games allow you to spectate game play and people will communicate information about the game like what the opposition is doing. The anonymity of the internet and exploitative nature of people is an entirely different discussion. It's like any social gathering focused around an entertaining event like cards or sports. Many people will first be introduced to the community when searching for help about a game or game platform. There is an active incentive to improve your team or collaborative members because it makes for a better experience for everyone. They are looking for information but this can transition into a sharing of experiences and active participation with the community as they interact and engage with others. It expands on the experience and on it's own provides the engagement, entertainment and enrichment.
Noface
Scott Woodbury
Posted 8 months ago
Community Organization and Impact in Online Games
Back when the gaming community was a new thing clans and guilds were formed on the original BBS sites. These were shared within the games themselves and at tech hosted events like the computer trade shows, spread word of mouth at business trade shows with people within the computer industry and by the early independent game developers through the distribution centers that sold their games. When the online gaming community began to form and the internet became more available more resources were available to use and new and better tools were created. The desire and motivation for self propagation. The "I want this so I will build this" and the common traits of others to also want to share in "this". As the internet and tech grew so did the services that supported these aspects of communities. BBS grew into forums and professionals in the industry explored ways to simplify the process to make it more accessible to the masses. As the task of creation, networking and sharing has improved so has the community expanded. Since social media has exploded driven by peoples desire to expand on and share personal experiences the community has filtered down to lower levels of specific skills required to enter the space and engage with others. So my history has a storied past from my desire to use the tools of computing, to learning how to build them because of the cost. The sharing of knowledge with personal communication at these trade shows to BBS sites. I then moved on to game network web sites and communication tools like Roger Wilco and Team speak. Then games began to incorporate communication within the games. Game developers and network sites began hosting their own forums for related communication and these spawned the independent user created forums. The social medium has provided other sites and many paths to community like Myspace, Facebook, Skype, twitter, YouTube and Twitch TV. The social community communicatio is spread out across many areas these days
Noface
Scott Woodbury
Posted 8 months ago
Community Organization and Impact in Online Games
The game medium is an engineered and structured environment so the intrinsic nature of the people who seek to get the most out of the experience can have similar personal traits and skills suited for the complex and organized structure required to build them. The ones that stand out are the ones who have attracted the people with these common interests, skill sets and have formed the bonds to invest in and find value in the experience. A relative example I feel that directly relates to these complex communities are the ones that formed from military experience, the bonds that were formed among the veterans and the organizations that were built from the participants. The AMVETS (American Veterans) and VFW (Veterans of Foreign Wars) are examples. The aspect of community is the natural progression of sharing of experience and the desire to expand and grow. Gaming is simply the medium in relative context to the discussion.