About Genevieve

Bio

BBA from York University; B.Ed from University of Toronto; M.Ed from University of Toronto

An idea worth spreading

8 hugs a day! SPF 15. Disarm them with a smile. Cook / prepare as many of your meals yourself as you can. Build muscle and bone through exercise while you're young. You are amazing. Stop shopping for shit you don't need. Make time for nothingness every day. Courage, my Love. Travel light. Take photos. Love your lover for real or not at all. Write cheesy ass songs or poems until they are good. Define your own goals and success. Think sexy thoughts. Have dinner parties. Toast your parents. Cry. Be funny in another language. Kiss like you mean it. Work like you mean it. Strive to sleep well every day. Speak clearly. And only lie about your biological age.

I'm passionate about

Education for children, adults and myself, having a good time, cooking and picnics!

Talk to me about

TED talks, living in the matrix, health, good ideas

People don't know I'm good at

Knitting, composing songs and painting.

My TED story

TED is like the education I never had. I've learned so much. I've been a little excessive on the viewing, but this is the closest to being cyborgs with these fabulous (most of them) speakers and thinkers.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

37807
Genevieve Tran
Posted 3 months ago
Simon Anholt: Which country does the most good for the world?
The recent 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr's speech; this year's #worldpride and world conversations about women's rights are indications that social equality issues are becoming global. But until people in first world countries become educated to the fact that it's their consumer choices and the economic policies of their elected governments that are equally, if not more, damaging to people in other parts of the world than the incidences of hate crime, collapsing buildings, corruption or terrorism that we like to protest against, things aren't going to change. Economic incentives to change are the only things that really make the world go 'round. Each nation state, unfortunately, has a zero-sum economic model.
37807
Genevieve Tran
Posted 6 months ago
Christopher Emdin: Teach teachers how to create magic
Theorists, dead or alive, aren't all bad--and Mr. Emdin is actually vouching for one. This is the concept of Multiple Intelligences (Howard Gardner, Harvard University)--I paraphrase: that different students have different gateways to learn a given concept: through reading, through dancing it out, through playing a game, through performing a song about it etc. So, Mr. Emdin is right to identify that kids in urban settings probably have particular interests that schools should leverage in order to better engage them (rather than blindly apply some standards out of a Chicago teaching lab nationwide). Bringing the GZA into the Bronx's high school biology classes to rap about evolution is definitely one great way. Though, it's just one gateway and it won't work for all students. Teachers actually have the appallingly difficult task of differentiating their instruction to every individual in their care, if they really want each to bloom and grow. Just like a garden of rare flowers. It's why class size, and non-wussy teachers, matter. It is a crazy job.
37807
Genevieve Tran
Posted 6 months ago
Hugh Herr: The new bionics that let us run, climb and dance
The technology is not the astonishment, it's Mr. Herr so aggressively applying his intellect to decimate fear, inadequacy and excuses in life. His flipping the script on able-bodied people, that they don't know what they are missing, makes him a true revolutionary in his field! I want an exoskeleton!!
37807
Genevieve Tran
Posted 6 months ago
Ed Yong: Suicidal crickets, zombie roaches and other parasite tales
Recently American Vogue's Editor's brain was reportedly hijacked when readers suddenly saw the nefarious "socks and sandals" tapeworms on the cover. Subsequently, OUR attention was hijacked by the story, away from productivity and more world-changing issues. Though, Mr. Yong now has made me REALLY look at who is behind all this manipulation, and I have pinpointed it to Mr. Ryan "Cockroach Wasp" Seacrest, producer of tapeworm porn! (Despite being a host victim, my cognitive dissonance puts up a fight every day...)
37807
Genevieve Tran
Posted 6 months ago
Toby Shapshak: You don't need an app for that
For me, that was the subtext of of the talk and the reason he delivered it in the way he did. Some TED speakers are very direct about their idea, some choose an angle for effect. I think the privileged, educated Western audience would know of the all the implications a speaker from Africa has about rising, competing against and even besting them. It's a challenge--and at TED, a welcome one.
37807
Genevieve Tran
Posted 6 months ago
Toby Shapshak: You don't need an app for that
This talk made me think that because Africans don't have the "noise" of the first world, innovating and thinking from first principles is more possible to do there. As we face huge fundamental problems that seem too complex or expensive to fix in the developed world, it's a compelling idea to look to the laboratory of Africa, to cut out middlemen, cut unnecessary features and cut to the chase. It looks like they are more on track of creating "master products" that are robust and last, unlike producers here who too often design with obsolescence, waste and constant upgrades in mind to milk more margins.