Theodore A. Hoppe

Montpelier, VT, United States

About Theodore A.

Bio

In "1984" Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. In "Brave New World," Huxley feared that the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Nowadays, people, by in large, are not controlled by inflicting pain, as Orwell imagined, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. Orwell feared that what we hated would ruin us, while Huxley feared that what we loved, "man's infinite appetite for distraction", will ruin us.

An idea worth spreading

"Self Comes to Mind" by Antonio Damasio, "Incomplete Nature" by Terrence Deacon, "The End of Science" John Horgan, "The General Theory of Love" Lewis, Amini, Lannon. "Connected" by Nicholas Christakis & James Fowler, "Being Wrong" by Kathryn Schulz, "The Philosophical Child" by Alison Gopnok, "Evolution's End" by Joseph Chilton Pierce, "Into the Silent Land" by Paul Broks, "Loneliness" by John T. Cacioppo & William Patrick, "Moral Minds" by Marc Hauser, "The Neuroscience of Human Relationships" by Louis Cozolino, Multiple Intelligence" by Howard Gardner, "The Science of Success by David Dobbs, The Meme Machine by Susan Blackmore, "Predictably Irrational" by Dan Ariely, "The Tending Instinct" by Shelley Taylor, "Multiplicity: The New Science of Personality, Identity and Self" by Rita Carter, the Philoctetes Center in New York City,

I'm passionate about

love of learning, appreciation of beauty and excellence, creativity, ingenuity, and originality, curiosity and interest in the world.

Talk to me about

You....-your ideas, your passion, and how I can help you. eGovernance, immersive virtual worlds, lateral thinking,

People don't know I'm good at

Editing my typos, biking, fantasy sports.

My TED story

My identical twin suggested I join TED after discussing the lectures by Susan Blackmore found on this site. It's been about a year since I joined TED and started commenting on the talks and sharing my ideas with the TED community. I feel honored that fellow members have responded in the positive way they have with their feedback, and that I have reach a milestone I consider an accomplishment. As Gary Vaynerchuk said, " The fact that anyone cares what you say is a huge deal." My TED story is that I continue to spread the ideas TED embodies by creating library events and programs, and encouraging the use of TED talks in the local schools.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

105570
Theodore A. Hoppe
Posted 2 days ago
Johann Hari: Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong
Clearly there is research that disagrees with your with your unsupported statements, so yes, I would expect that you might cite something that supports your claims for you are referring to it. And I think I have already addressed the fact that your training, or even your interactions with addicts might support the myth of the "disease" model.
105570
Theodore A. Hoppe
Posted 3 days ago
Johann Hari: Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong
The research by Prof. Bruce Anderson:. "The Rat Park research attracted lots of attention in the local media in our city, and among our students at our university, but in the larger world of addiction theory it sank like a stone, even after other researchers replicated our findings. We had hoped that our research might initiate a serious reconsideration of the conventional wisdom on the causes of addition. When it didn’t, we were surprised and disappointed." http://www.brucekalexander.com/articles-speeches/rat-park/148-addiction-the-view-from-rat-park
105570
Theodore A. Hoppe
Posted 3 days ago
Johann Hari: Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong
Re: "There is solid research about brain differences in people who are prone to addiction" I can fully appreciate the fact that your, may I use the word limited, training has provided you with understanding of addition in terms of the disease model, and that is one of the issues that this talk attempts to address: the "recovery" industry has hoisted this model onto us at the excusion f any other alternative view. And, you would still need to supply some additional research that supports your statement that, "the majority of people who receive drugs in a medical setting do not become addicted" because of genetic factors. There is also evidence that there are "epigenetics" influences involved, not just genetic one, that are associated with what you have called "solid evidence." [see the research of Dr Eric Nestler, Mt Sini Medical Ctr ] I'll brake it down for you a bit: Genetics may provide the switch but the environment can turn the switch on or off. My question to you is whether you have looked at any of Bruce Alexander's research, because you seem to be saying ALL addiction is genetic, and I would question how this applies too the rats in Rat Park? Finally, until you pen up to the possibility that these guys might be on to something here you are not going to understand that its NOT about loving them more [which is contextually vague], its about the right kind of love and nurturing.
105570
Theodore A. Hoppe
Posted 8 days ago
Johann Hari: Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong
The research by Prof. Bruce Anderson:. "The Rat Park research attracted lots of attention in the local media in our city, and among our students at our university, but in the larger world of addiction theory it sank like a stone, even after other researchers replicated our findings. We had hoped that our research might initiate a serious reconsideration of the conventional wisdom on the causes of addition. When it didn’t, we were surprised and disappointed." http://www.brucekalexander.com/articles-speeches/rat-park/148-addiction-the-view-from-rat-park
105570
Theodore A. Hoppe
Posted 9 days ago
Johann Hari: Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong
The "War on Drugs," where policing agency profit from the drug trade, both through dollars to fight drug "crime" and forfeiture is only a part of the picture. How many professionals are invested in the recovery business? "Drug and alcohol treatment and rehab represents a multibillion-dollar industry in the Western world. (Costs vary from country to country but are generally above $2,500 per week in the United States and Canada, slightly lower in Britain and Europe.) And while the size of the problem may justify the enormous size of this network, we must recognize the industry as a special interest with much to gain and much to lose. The definition of addiction as a disease, endorsed by the medical and scientific communities and most Western governments, may be the most powerful marketing tool there is for the rehab industry. It’s not only a great way to get people in the door—clearly people with a disease need treatment, and judges in the United States have fully endorsed this logic—but also a way of explaining what goes wrong when treatment doesn’t work. Because no doctor, nurse, or shrink will ever tell you that they can fix you for sure. All they can say is that they’ll try. And if you end up not getting fixed, well, that’s the way it is with diseases. And probably you didn’t quite follow the regimen you were instructed to follow." http://www.salon.com/2015/07/11/addiction_is_not_a_disease_how_aa_and_12_step_programs_erect_barriers_while_attempting_to_relieve_suffering/
105570
Theodore A. Hoppe
Posted 26 days ago
David Chalmers: How do you explain consciousness?
"Finally, it is quite a different question whether single cell-organisms, worms or other simple metazoans—vastly simpler than mammals with their large brains—have sentience. I do share with the letter writers a hunch that it may well be that “it feels like something to be a worm”. However, that is a question that right now can’t be answered in any meaningful empirically accessible manner." http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/mind-guest-blog/exclusive-oliver-sacks-antonio-damasio-and-others-debate-christof-koch-on-the-nature-of-consciousness/
105570
Theodore A. Hoppe
Posted about 1 month ago
Jane McGonigal: Gaming can make a better world
"Researchers from Brown University’s Laboratory for Cognitive and Perceptual Learning have published findings in PLOS ONE suggesting people who play video games on a regular basis are not only better and faster perceptual (visual) learners than non-frequent gamers, but are more resistant to perceptual interference, which may lead to more stable, long-term learning." http://www.psypost.org/2015/06/study-gamers-shielded-from-perceptual-interference-enhancing-their-learning-abilities-35228
105570
Theodore A. Hoppe
Posted 3 months ago
David Chalmers: How do you explain consciousness?
"We conclude that basic aspects of consciousness like primary self and core self (based on anoetic and noetic consciousness) are present in many species of vertebrates and that, even self-consciousness (autonoetic consciousness) does not seem to be a prerogative of humans and of some non-human primates but may, to a certain extent, be present in some other mammals and birds" http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnhum.2015.00157/full?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Neuroscience-w19-2015