Timmoty Wigboldus

Student
Zeist, Utrecht, Netherlands

About Timmoty

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Languages

Dutch, English

I'm passionate about

biology and linguistics, the environment and human rights. I study biology and I have an interested layman's knowledge of linguistics.

Universities

Utrecht University

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Timmoty Wigboldus
Posted over 2 years ago
Robin Ince: Science versus wonder?
Isn't experiencing wonder always something that is an attribute of ourselves? It is the way we respond to the stimuli we register. In principle anything could make us experience wonder, or prevent us from doing so. Except we are biologically and culturally biased towards experiencing wonder in some situations rather than in others.
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Timmoty Wigboldus
Posted about 3 years ago
Should Debates be allowed in another languages?
It is indeed not easy for everyone to join an English conversation. So, from that perspective it would be great to have conversations in your own language. I agree with that. But looking at it another way, it would also mean that many things that will be discussed will only be available for the relatively small group of people speaking the language in question. You could join the Spanish conversations and look at the English ones every now and then, and I could join a conversation in Dutch. But we would deny ourselves the opportunity to appreciate each other's conversations. I hope that in the not too distant future translating technology will make it possible to have a real conversation between people who do not share a language, but until then I think making the effort to speak a foreign language is worth it. Especially on a site like this.
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Timmoty Wigboldus
Posted about 3 years ago
Can people who deny science be educated? How?
Please consider all of what I'm about to say as preceded with a huge "in my experience". People who think this way can of course learn about things like evolution or plate tectonics and I know some people who can elegantly explain these but still think they are untrue. As this way of thinking is as far as I have seen always rooted in (religious) belief people are not going to let go of it quickly and easily. And that was your question, is it not? But people can change their minds about this. The realisation that the three claims you mentioned are perhaps flawed can set in motion this change, as I have understood from a number of people that this happened to. Therefore I present three answers to the claims that could perhaps make the people that Want to be educated think. But even if it makes someone think, it would probably still take months or years before they change their position. 'My experience shows otherwise' People should realise that even the most profound of our experiences can be nothing but a product of our mind. This does not have to make it worthless, I don't think it does, just not something to base your understanding of the world on. 'Scientific results are always changing' I could never improve on this: http://chem.tufts.edu/AnswersInScience/RelativityofWrong.htm, or see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tcOi9a3-B0. It basically sais that scientific understanding is not just changing randomly, but getting incrementally closer to reality. People for example once thought the world was a perfect sphere (except for the mountains of course), which it is not. It is however closer to the truth than the idea the earth is flat. 'Each person has his own truth' Well, no. Each person has their own view of reality, but that does not mean that reality is different for different people. If I think the earth is a perfect sphere, it doesn't change the shape of the earth. What I think doesn't change reality, but I can change what I think to make it fit reality.