Jacques Naves

About Jacques

Bio

After 10 years in deployment of new technologies (GIS, Internet) for a French environmental agency, Jacques Naves joined ViaMichelin in 2001 at the company launch. He managed POI purchasing and production. In 2005, he managed Real Time Trafic Information service when ViaMichelin launched RDS-TMC service in France. At the same time he became representative of ViaMichelin at the TMC Forum.
In 2007 TMC Forum merged with TPEG Forum and Mobile Info Project to give birth to the Traveller Information Service Association (TISA). For this association, Jacques Naves is convenor of the Business Analysis Working Group, chairman of the Content and Service Provision Committee and member of the Steering Board.
He is in charge of digital partnerships at Michelin Travel Partner, formerly ViaMichelin, in the fields of ITS, Hotel Booking Services and other affiliation partnerships.

Comments & conversations

211482
Jacques Naves
Posted over 1 year ago
How can we as citizens be empowered to reduce traffic and pollution in our densest cities? What’s one thing you would do to create change?
Dear Christophe, I share your point of view regarding the need for multiple actions to be taken in parallel. I will add one: do we need to drive big cars all the time? Most of the year I use a small car (3,70m in length) for my private travels: lower consumption, easier to park, cheaper insurance fee… And when I go for long distance travels, I rent a bigger car. Of course this is not a solution for all. But it could help for sustainable mobility. More generally, there is one action you did not mention: education. I have worked in water quality management in France. We succeed to maintain or improve our water quality compared to what it was in the 60’s. Strong investments in sewage network and treatment plants were done paid by taxes and by stakeholders. This is the main reason why we succeed. But also thanks to an education program set up to explain the water lifecycle targeting primary and secondary schools but also well-targeted exhibitions. People realize that water in the river is the same as the one they get at their tap. They better understand why it is important to avoid to waste or to pollute water: it costs to clean it up and/or it has impacts on their environment. Can we do the same with transports? I am positively convinced. We can explain the impacts of our behavior: pollution, economic losses due to waste of time, health impacts due to pollution and driver stress in traffic jam (who has never been upset to be stuck in traffic jam?)… People can better understand what they are doing when they are driving only for 1km / 1 miles. And what are the consequences of such attitude. You have also to explain what they can do to lower their impact and how they can do it. That’s a way to empower people. But it takes time. Yes for sure. But how long it takes to change inner-city infrastructure? How long it takes to dig a new tube/subway line? From the first scheduling of the project to its end, 20 years may have passed! One generation.
211482
Jacques Naves
Posted over 1 year ago
How can we as citizens be empowered to reduce traffic and pollution in our densest cities? What’s one thing you would do to create change?
James, I fully agree with you regarding the digital revolution. This is a clear opportunity to optimize our transports. Not only as you mentioned by the development of tele-access to work, administration, shopping… but also the way we are managing our individual travels. This is the field of Intelligent Transports Systems (ITS) where you can find: - Road and public transport traffic information to optimize our daily travels: when to leave for the best travel time? Which transport should I choose? It is still surprising to discover new routes in place like Paris area depending on the hour of the day. - Smartphones apps can help for finding available car park space without driving around for 20mn; can help for requesting taxis; rent car between private people... - Car to Car communication will be a new step to improve safety and security on road, therefore helping sustainable mobility (see the ground test in Ann Arbor, MI http://www.annarbor.com/news/university-of-michigan-seeking-3000-motorists-to-participate/#.UDPWsUxSRwY). - Etc. Digital technology brings tools and service to help our mobility requirements. But we must also ensure to make them simple for a mass adoption in our daily life.
211482
Jacques Naves
Posted over 1 year ago
How can we as citizens be empowered to reduce traffic and pollution in our densest cities? What’s one thing you would do to create change?
From a European perspective, commuting is a major problem for big cities. Many policies are tested from implementing toll area in city centers (London, GBR; Stockholm, SWE), use of charged surrounding car parks with access to the public transports included in the fare (Bordeaux, FRA), public car sharing (Paris, FRA)… Development of public transports is a major issue. When it is possible to plan new cities or extensions, public transports should be set in the top list (see comment from Vera Nova below). When you need to redesign the network in old cities, it is more difficult. But can be achieve: see what has been done in Curitiba, BRA ( http://www.urbanhabitat.org/files/25.Curitiba.pdf ) where 70% of its commuters are taking the bus. Facing demographic explosion, the city is now developing bicycle: 300 kilometers of tracks are under construction. But outside big cities or for long travel distance, public transports can be less efficient. I am very surprised by the development of Car Pooling in Europe. Millions of people are meeting every working day to share their personal car to go to work. 20 years ago people were considering their car as a private (and closed) space only for them. Now they are ready to share it to optimize their travel cost and travel time. It can divide by 2 or 3 the number of commuting cars. It seems that if we want to sustain mobility in an efficient and agile way, we will need a combination of policies including regulations like toll areas, education, usage of new technologies like ITS (connected cars, mobility safe apps…), Internet to work from home when possible, fuel efficient cars,…