Bill Kendrick

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Bill Kendrick
Posted over 1 year ago
What have you researched?
What does the ability to separate atoms mean to you? If it means nothing, then you have no clue what I have told you. That is what this is all about.. Medicine, science, the environment and the world needs this.
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Bill Kendrick
Posted over 1 year ago
What have you researched?
Greg Water is the hardest to separate the atoms on, using my Flashing Liquid Process. I found the difference in the boiling temperatures of hydrogen, and oxygen in water is only 18 degrees Fahrenheit. (212 to 230 degrees Fahrenheit). Water is used to extinguish fire, so it's cooling effect is fast. This is why to sustain a continuous hydrogen production from water will require a larger mass heat source. It is the large mass that will retain the right temperature while the water is sprayed onto the heater. In my video using the pan on the water the temperature fluctuated, and I could only spray the water once or twice, before the temperature got out of the 18 degrees needed to turn the hydrogen to a gas, while the oxygen remained a liquid, long enough to separate the two atoms. This all means using the Flashing Liquid Process all liquids have more than one boiling temperature..
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Bill Kendrick
Posted over 1 year ago
What have you researched?
Greg Almost 30 years ago I went to a seminar on 100 miles per gallon on gasoline vapor. At the time I didn't know the whole thing was a scam. They had hand drawn plans but no working modlel. I duplicated their design, and in trying to get enough heat to vaporize the gasoline, I used an electric fry pan. I was outside, and turned the pan to it's highest temperature. I spilled a small amount of gasoline into the fry pan, and instantly I got a white vapor. I discarded the scam chamber, and started again. I could spray a fine mist of gasoline, and make more white vapor than a vehicle could use. I played with it for over 20 years, had it on 7 different vehicles, tested on 2 different dynamometers, getting a 50% increase in horsepower over gasoline. I tested it on one smog analyzer, and got a zero parts per million hydrocarbon reading. Nobody, still today can do this, unless they use my Flashing Liquid Process, spraying the liquid onto the heated surface at the right temperature. I put it on You Tube, and got many questions. In trying to answer the questions, I came to realize just what I did. I discovered gasoline is suppose to auto ignite around 530 degrees Fahrenheit, however science is not perfect. You see I have seen a wrought iron electric heating element turn a dull red before the gasoline would ignite, this is around 800 to 1000 degrees or hotter. I had been playing with gasoline in a temperature range that science says does not exist, for over 29 years. I had created a non flammable liquid and a white vapor, of which neither would mix with the gasoline they were created from. In the last 2 years I realized I separated the atoms in gasoline, and knew it could be done to any liquid. It comes down to the right temperature applied the right way. You see heat transfer happens first, but if you apply a fine mist of the liquid onto the heated surface, the fine droplets will go to the heater temperature first and boil at that temperature, separating atoms.
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Bill Kendrick
Posted over 1 year ago
What have you researched?
I have researched a way to separate atoms in any liquid. I did it to gasoline first. I got a white vapor with twice the power of gasoline, and a non flammable liquid, neither of which would mix with the gasoline they were created from. I also did it to water and got a flammable gas, and we all know that had to be hydrogen. See my 3 videos on my You Tube channel Bill Kendrick, read the comments and see when I realized what I did. I originally wanted to run an automobile on gasoline vapor, and discovered I had separated the atoms in gasoline, then to prove it I did it to water. I call my process Flashing Liquid.