peter carr

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peter carr
Posted over 1 year ago
How does the discovery of the Higgs boson affect our real life?
Are we nearly talking about God? maybe we are.The "nearly" is a good touch. One can drown within reach of the river bank. You can think you are within touching distance of God without actually believing in the received version of God. I happen to think it not impossible that we are one of a series of infinite possible worlds. I find it quite easy, in a possible infinite universe to imagine the term 'distance' to be meaningless. It seems to me that there is only comparative distance, and of course no distance exists compared to infinity(aren't we coming closer to this idea with the evidence of particles, light years apart, mimicking each other's behaviour). Speed and motion are self evidently comparative. I am sure these thoughts are enshrined in existing theories. I don't seek to prove I am right about any of this. I'm always aware that, in all things I could be mistaken. I suppose if there was a God, then it might as well be the universe itself.
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peter carr
Posted over 1 year ago
How does the discovery of the Higgs boson affect our real life?
Lots of points of view to consider. As far as not taking issue with something unless you can come up with a better idea. Well. Who amongst us is going to propose an alternative theory of everything, just in order that he can make a contrary comment? There IS a precedent for the idea that you need to believe what you are told, unless you can prove another point of view. It's called faith. This is what the church establishment relies on for it's very existence. Of course I don't know how the universe is formed. Of course I don't know how what came before what there is now. Of course I don't know if the universe is infinite. And when we are being told that, according to quantum physics, everything changes as soon as our back is turned, I suspect that nobody else does either. It's just that some of us are better at hard sums. To question the veracity of something is not to seek to belittle that thing's proponents. History is littered with disproven theories, formulated by brilliant men.
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peter carr
Posted over 1 year ago
How does the discovery of the Higgs boson affect our real life?
The first paragraph said something about wizards. Not anything I recognised from my part of the debate. The second rather depended on me having asserted the first. I accept the part about the good intentions of scientists. No need to elaborate on the difference between intentions and results. You would have to know me better to know if I was arrogant, and I accept my ignorance in most matters. The Physicist Arthur Eddington, When told he was only one of three people to understand the law of relativity, asked "who's the other one?" There was a man who understood the preponderance of ignorance.
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peter carr
Posted over 1 year ago
How does the discovery of the Higgs boson affect our real life?
Most people tend to believe the evidence of their own eyes first, followed by a sound dose of common sense. The is not a scrap of real evidence for the Big Bang theory. It is a theory, the clue is in the name. I love the term "share with us" that instinctive circling of the wagons. We are all free to draw conclusions from what we see and experience. I have seen sunsets and waterfalls. I believe in them. I have not seen a big bang, and neither has anyone else. Nor will anyone ever see such a thing. The idea is based on reams of calculations, understood by only a few, this is my point of view. You have a different one. Thats what makes life interesting. Btw, associating natural scepticism with astrology is not intelligent debate.
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peter carr
Posted over 1 year ago
How does the discovery of the Higgs boson affect our real life?
I must concede the point that not virtually everybody in the world thought it was flat. I am new to on line discussion, and realise that generalisations lead to misunderstandings. I read the same references as you did only after I had made the assertion. You are right to correct me. Thank you for not taking the opportunity to belittle me.
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peter carr
Posted over 1 year ago
How does the discovery of the Higgs boson affect our real life?
Wow. I understood that this was a site for logical debate. Is it actually permissible not to share your point of view? Not really worth going into why you think I am these things. I have a point of view, and I am not intimidated by those who seek to quash debate. I use technology and medicine too. Why would anyone think otherwise? I am not sure who Eywa is. I would have to see some proof of the existence of Eywa, but I would be up for believing in it/him/her. As long as the proof didn't consist of asserting that Eywa was infinitely large, but grew in an infinitely short time from something infinitely small. That would just be silly.
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peter carr
Posted over 1 year ago
How does the discovery of the Higgs boson affect our real life?
Thats where the great majority of the population are at a disadvantage. we aren't physics teachers. From the B ig Bang theory, to quarks and string, we watch the story unfolding with open mouths. The world that the scientists occupy has a language of it's own. It seems to be the equivalent of the mediaeval church scholars teaching the bible in Latin. I don't think many people outside the scientific community give any credence to any of it. No matter how long the equation "proving" that everything was once concentrated into an infinitely small space, it remains fundamentally unlikely.